jm + press   4

Apollo Press Kits
Press kits prepared by the public relations staff at the major contractors for the Apollo 11 mission provided valuable additional information not found in NASA issued news releases. Reporters and editors from media outlets including television and newspapers had access to such documents from dozens of manufacturers while working on stories about the first lunar landing.

These press kits are beautifully prepared, with stunning artwork and fascinating period photographs.

It's taken me fifteen years of collecting to amass what I believe to be the most complete collection of Apollo 11 press kits in the world. I'm always on the hunt for more, so please contact me if you have any.

Now, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, I've digitized my collection to make it available to scholars, marketers, Apollo buffs, and fans of graphic design. 
apollo  nasa  history  space  spacecraft  press  1960s 
4 weeks ago by jm
The Oxygen of Amplification

Offering extremely candid comments from mainstream journalists, this report provides a snapshot of an industry [news media] caught between the pressure to deliver page views, the impulse to cover manipulators and “trolls,” and the disgust (expressed in interviewees’ own words) of accidentally propagating extremist ideology.

After reviewing common methods of “information laundering” of radical and racist messages through the press, Phillips uses journalists’ own words to propose a set of editorial “better practices” intended to reduce manipulation and harm.

As social and digital media are leveraged to reconfigure the information landscape, Phillips argues that this new domain requires journalists to take what they know about abuses of power and media manipulation in traditional information ecosystems; and apply and adapt that knowledge to networked actors, such as white nationalist networks online.
media  news  harassment  nazis  fascism  overton-window  journalism  racism  press 
5 weeks ago by jm
The Cybercrime Wave That Wasn’t - NYTimes.com
MSFT researchers discover fundamental scientific failures in almost all data on cybercrime/spam/malware damages. 'In numeric surveys, errors are almost always upward: since the amounts of estimated losses must be positive, there’s no limit on the upside, but zero is a hard limit on the downside. As a consequence, respondent errors -- or outright lies -- cannot be canceled out. Even worse, errors get amplified when researchers scale between the survey group and the overall population. [...] The cybercrime surveys we have examined exhibit exactly this pattern of enormous, unverified outliers dominating the data. In some, 90 percent of the estimate appears to come from the answers of one or two individuals. In a 2006 survey of identity theft by the FTC, two respondents gave answers that would have added $37 billion to the estimate, dwarfing that of all other respondents combined.' my opinion: this is what happens when PR drives the surveys -- numbers tend to inflate to make headlines
fail  science  pr  press  cybercrime  ms  via:mark-russinovitch  data  surveys  spam  malware  viruses  phishing 
april 2012 by jm

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