jm + pregnancy   7

repealfacts and FAQs.pdf
Louise Kenny, Consultant Obstetrician and Professor of Maternal and Fetal Health, systematically demolishes anti-choice propaganda points with solid scientific facts
repeal  repealthe8th  science  biology  medicine  pregnancy  abortion  pro-choice  ireland  miscarriage 
28 days ago by jm
The Internet Thinks I’m Still Pregnant - The New York Times
This is pretty awful -- an accidental, careless and brutal side effect of marketers passing on sensitive info to one another, without respect for their users' privacy:

'I hadn’t realized, however, that when I had entered my information into the pregnancy app, the company would then share it with marketing groups targeting new mothers. Although I logged my miscarriage into the app and stopped using it, that change in status apparently wasn’t passed along. Seven months after my miscarriage, mere weeks before my due date, I came home from work to find a package on my welcome mat. It was a box of baby formula bearing the note: “We may all do it differently, but the joy of parenthood is something we all share.”'
privacy  pregnancy  miscarriage  data-protection  apps  babies  parenthood 
september 2016 by jm
The science behind "don't drink when pregnant" is rubbish
As the economist Emily Oster pointed out in her 2013 book Expecting Better, there is also no “proven safe” level of Tylenol or caffeine, and yet both are fine in moderation during pregnancy. Oster pored through reams of research on alcohol and pregnancy for her book and concluded that there is simply no scientific evidence that light drinking during pregnancy impacts a baby’s health. (In one frequently cited 2001 study that suggested light drinking in pregnancy increases the chances of a child displaying aggressive behaviors, the drinkers were also significantly likelier to have taken cocaine during pregnancy.)


My wife also followed the paper trail on this issue in the past. In the papers from which these recommendations were derived, the level of drinking at which any effects were observed in babies was when women consumed at least *9 units every day* for the entire pregnancy. That's an entire bottle of wine, daily!
booze  alcohol  science  facts  papers  medicine  emily-oster  babies  pregnancy  pre-pregnant  research 
february 2016 by jm
The dark truth about modern Ireland its media don't talk about
Sinead O'Shea writing for the Guardian:
The economy has been built on cronyism, group-think, the double talk of absurdly low corporate tax rates and light touch regulation, the cult of the leader, an over reliance on "strong" international forces. These were the factors that caused the Celtic Tiger to collapse.

This has had consequences for all. It's the same for the system of shame and sexual repression. The impact has not been restricted to its most obvious victims. Ireland is not just a bad place to be a woman or an immigrant, it's a bad place to be in any way "different." As a result, sadly, it's a bad place to be anyone at all.
ireland  history  women  celtic-tiger  industrial-schools  immigration  sinead-o-shea  tuam  abortion  pregnancy 
june 2014 by jm
The Irish Times, terminations and Holles Street: The story that wasn’t there.
Summarising a very shoddy tale from our paper of record.
I don’t know what happened here. I don’t know whether there ever was a woman who met the description given by the Irish Times who suffered a medical crisis during pregnancy. I don’t know why a group of men in positions of authority in the Irish Times decided that, if there was such a woman, they had any right to tell the rest of the country about her experiences. I don’t know why, when they discovered that a mistake had been made in the one legal fact used to justify that decision they didn’t immediately apologise.

And I don’t know what happened between the 23rd August 2013 and 31st August 2013 to prompt them to print a shoulder shrugging ‘acceptance’ that the case ‘hadn’t happened’ and limit the paper’s apology to an institution, as opposed to its readers. But, from what I’ve seen this week, I do know one thing. Whatever questions readers might have, The Irish Times isn’t interested in giving them any answers.
irish-times  fail  shoddy  abortion  health  public-interest  journalism  pregnancy  corrections 
september 2013 by jm
Savita Halappanavar’s inquest: the three questions that must be answered | Dr. Jen Gunter
A professional OB/GYN analyses the horrors coming to light in the Savita inquest. Here's one particular gem:
Fetal survival with ruptured membranes at 17 weeks is 0%, this is from prospective study. [...but] “real and substantial risk” to the woman’s life is what is required by the Irish constitution to terminate a pregnancy, *whether or not the foetus is viable*.


So the foetus had 0% chance of survival -- but still termination was not considered an option. Bloody hell.
religion  ireland  savita  horrors  malpractice  galway  guh  hospitals  hse  health  inquest  abortion  pro-choice  pregnancy 
april 2013 by jm
Facts still sacred despite Ireland's spectrum of conflicting views on abortion - The Irish Times - Fri, Jun 29, 2012
Very good data-driven analysis.

"Pro-life” groups claim abortion is a serious mental health risk for women. Youth Defence claims women who opt for an abortion rather than carrying to term or giving the baby up for adoption suffer mental maladies such as depression, suicide and other problems. But this is at heart a scientific claim, and can thus be tested. [...]

Psychologist Dr Brenda Majors studied this in depth and found no evidence that ["post-abortion syndrome"] exists. As long as a woman was not depressive before an abortion, “elective abortion of an unintended pregnancy does not pose a risk to mental health”.

The same results were found in several other studies [...] Essentially these studies found there was no difference in mental health between those who opted for abortion and those who carried to term. Curiously, there was a markedly increased risk to mental health for women who gave a child up for adoption.

A corollary of the research was that while women did not suffer long-term mental health effects due to abortion, short-term guilt and sadness was far more likely if the women had a background where abortion was viewed negatively or their decisions were decried -- the kind of attitude fostered by “pro-life” activists."
pro-choice  pro-life  abortion  data  facts  via:irish-times  research  science  pregnancy  depression  pas 
june 2012 by jm

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