jm + poetry   5

The Codeless Code: Case 234 Ozymandias
Love this:
I chanced upon an ancient cache of code:
a stack of printouts, tall as any man,
that in decaying boxes had been stowed.
Ten thousand crumbling pages long it ran.
Abandoned in the blackness to erode,
what steered a ship through blackness to the moon.
The language is unused in this late year.
The target hardware, likewise, lies in ruin.
Entombed within one lone procedure’s scope,
a line of code and then these words appear:

# TEMPORARY, I HOPE HOPE HOPE

The code beside persisting to the last—
as permanent as aught upon this sphere—
while overhead, a vacant moon flies past.
moon  apollo  coding  history  hacks  comments  funny  poetry  poems  ozymandias 
4 days ago by jm
The Fairy King’s advice on Trees. A poem from Early Ireland
This medieval Irish poem about trees is taken from a text known as Aidedh Ferghusa meic Léide (the Death of Fergus). In the poem, Iubhdán, the king of the fairies, advises the ruler of Ulster, Fergus mac Léide, on the special qualities of trees and which ones can be burned in the household fire.
fairies  trees  wood  history  fire  poems  poetry 
7 weeks ago by jm
An Algorithmic Investigation of the Highfalutin 'Poet Voice' - Atlas Obscura
'It’s easy to make fun of Poet Voice. But its proliferation across the space of academic poetry may have more serious implications as well. In a 2014 essay, “Poet Voice and Flock Mentality,” the poet Lisa Marie Basile connects it to an overall lack of diversity in the field, and a fear of breaking the mold. The consistent use of it, she writes, “delivers two messages: I am educated, I am taught, I am part-of a group … I am afraid to tell my own story in my own voice.”'
poet-voice  talking  speech  voices  intonation  droning  poetry 
may 2018 by jm
A poem about Silicon Valley, made up of Quora questions about Silicon Valley

Why do so many startups fail?
Why are all the hosts on CouchSurfing male?
Are we going to be tweeting for the rest of our lives?
Why do Silicon Valley billionaires choose average-looking wives?

What makes a startup ecosystem thrive?
What do people plan to do once they’re over 35?
Is an income of $160K enough to survive?
What kind of car does Mark Zuckerberg drive?

Are the real estate prices in Palo Alto crazy?
Do welfare programs make poor people lazy?
What are some of the biggest lies ever told?
How do I explain Bitcoin to a 6-year-old?

Why is Powdered Alcohol not successful so far?
How does UberX handle vomiting in the car?
Is being worth $10 million considered ‘rich’?
What can be causing my upper lip to twitch?

Why has crowdfunding not worked for me?
Is it worth pre-ordering a Tesla Model 3?
How is Clinkle different from Venmo and Square?
Can karma, sometimes, be unfair?

Why are successful entrepreneurs stereotypically jerks?
Which Silicon Valley company has the best intern perks?
What looks easy until you actually try it?
How did your excretions change under a full Soylent diet?

What are alternatives to online dating?
Is living in small apartments debilitating?
Why don’t more entrepreneurs focus on solving world hunger?
What do you regret not doing when you were younger?
funny  tech  poetry  silicon-valley  humour  bitcoin  soylent  2016 
april 2016 by jm
"A Rough Justice"
The poem, written by Sir Robert Watson-Watt, inventor of radar, on being pulled over for speeding by a radar-gun-wielding policeman. "Watson-Watt received a speeding ticket in Canada when he was 64 years old. In his autobiography, _The Pulse of Radar_, he describes the experience. His wife is in the car, and she tries to pull the "don't you know who you're giving a ticket to?" trick on the policeman. Of course he doesn't know Watson-Watt, nor, it turns out, does he even know what radar is (he only knows what his "electronic speedometer" reads out), and Watson-Watt receives a $12.50 (Canadian) dollar fine." (via Rob Manuel)
via:robmanuel  radar  technology  irony  robert-watson-watt  poetry  history 
march 2012 by jm

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