jm + pki   17

isign
Let's see how long this lasts:
Today Sauce Labs is proud to open-source isign. isign can take an iOS app that was authorized to run only on one developer’s phone, and transform it so it can run on another developer’s phone. 

This is not a hack around Apple’s security. We figured out how Apple’s code signing works and re-implemented it in Python. So now you can use our isign utility anywhere – even on Linux!
signing  apple  code-signing  pki  ios  iphone  apps 
february 2016 by jm
CFSSL
Cloudflare's open source CA/PKI infrastructure app
cloudflare  pki  ca  ssl  tls  ops 
june 2015 by jm
1172401 – Add Amazon root certificates
Well, well -- looks like AWS is about to disrupt PKI, and about time too. If they come up with a Plex-style "provision a cert" API, it'll be revolutionary
pki  ssl  tls  amazon  aws  apis  web-services  ops 
june 2015 by jm
How Plex is doing HTTPS for all its users
large-scale automated TLS certificate deployment. very impressive and not easy to reproduce, good work Plex!

(via Nelson)
via:nelson  https  ssl  tls  certificates  pki  digicert  security  plex 
june 2015 by jm
Keywhiz
'a secret management and distribution service [from Square] that is now available for everyone. Keywhiz helps us with infrastructure secrets, including TLS certificates and keys, GPG keyrings, symmetric keys, database credentials, API tokens, and SSH keys for external services — and even some non-secrets like TLS trust stores. Automation with Keywhiz allows us to seamlessly distribute and generate the necessary secrets for our services, which provides a consistent and secure environment, and ultimately helps us ship faster. [...]

Keywhiz has been extremely useful to Square. It’s supported both widespread internal use of cryptography and a dynamic microservice architecture. Initially, Keywhiz use decoupled many amalgamations of configuration from secret content, which made secrets more secure and configuration more accessible. Over time, improvements have led to engineers not even realizing Keywhiz is there. It just works. Please check it out.'
square  security  ops  keys  pki  key-distribution  key-rotation  fuse  linux  deployment  secrets  keywhiz 
april 2015 by jm
Google delist CNNIC certs
As a result of a joint investigation of the events surrounding this incident by Google and CNNIC, we have decided that the CNNIC Root and EV CAs will no longer be recognized in Google products.
cnnic  certs  ssl  tls  security  certificates  pki  chrome  google 
april 2015 by jm
Belkin managed to put their firmware update private key in the distribution
'The firmware updates are encrypted using GPG, which is intended to prevent this issue. Unfortunately, Belkin misuses the GPG asymmetric encryption functionality, forcing it to distribute the firmware-signing key within the WeMo firmware image. Most likely, Belkin intended to use the symmetric encryption with a signature and a shared public key ring. Attackers could leverage the current implementation to easily sign firmware images.'

Using GPG to sign your firmware updates: yay. Accidentally leaving the private key in the distribution: sad trombone.
fail  wemo  belkin  firmware  embedded-systems  security  updates  distribution  gpg  crypto  public-key  pki  home-automation  ioactive 
february 2014 by jm
Trousseau
'an interesting approach to a common problem, that of securely passing secrets around an infrastructure. It uses GPG signed files under the hood and nicely integrates with both version control systems and S3.'

I like this as an approach to securely distributing secrets across a stack of services during deployment. Check in the file of keys, gpg keygen on the server, and add it to the keyfile's ACL during deployment. To simplify, shared or pre-generated GPG keys could also be used.

(via the Devops Weekly newsletter)
gpg  encryption  crypto  secrets  key-distribution  pki  devops  deployment 
february 2014 by jm
Newegg trial: Crypto legend takes the stand, goes for knockout patent punch | Ars Technica

"We've heard a good bit in this courtroom about public key encryption," said Albright. "Are you familiar with that?

"Yes, I am," said Diffie, in what surely qualified as the biggest understatement of the trial.

"And how is it that you're familiar with public key encryption?"

"I invented it."


(via burritojustice)
crypto  tech  security  patents  swpats  pki  whitfield-diffie  history  east-texas  newegg  patent-trolls 
november 2013 by jm
NSA: Possibly breaking US laws, but still bound by laws of computational complexity
I didn’t clearly explain that there’s an enormous continuum between, on the one hand, a full break of RSA or Diffie-Hellman (which still seems extremely unlikely to me), and on the other, “pure side-channel attacks” involving no new cryptanalytic ideas.  Along that continuum, there are many plausible places where the NSA might be.  For example, imagine that they had a combination of side-channel attacks, novel algorithmic advances, and sheer computing power that enabled them to factor, let’s say, ten 2048-bit RSA keys every year.  In such a case, it would still make perfect sense that they’d want to insert backdoors into software, sneak vulnerabilities into the standards, and do whatever else it took to minimize their need to resort to such expensive attacks.  But the possibility of number-theoretic advances well beyond what the open world knows certainly wouldn’t be ruled out.  Also, as Schneier has emphasized, the fact that NSA has been aggressively pushing elliptic-curve cryptography in recent years invites the obvious speculation that they know something about ECC that the rest of us don’t.
ecc  rsa  crypto  security  nsa  gchq  snooping  sniffing  diffie-hellman  pki  key-length 
september 2013 by jm
Nelson's Weblog: tech / bad / failure-of-encryption
One of the great failures of the Internet era has been giving up on end-to-end encryption. PGP dates back to 1991, 22 years ago. It gave us the technical means to have truly secure email between two people. But it was very difficult to use. And in 22 years no one has ever meaningfully made email encryption really usable. [...]

We do have SSL/HTTPS, the only real end-to-end encryption most of us use daily. But the key distribution is hopelessly centralized, authority rooted in 40+ certificates. At least 4 of those certs have been compromised by blackhat hackers in the past few years. How many more have been subverted by government agencies? I believe the SSL Observatory is the only way we’d know.


We do also have SSH. Maybe more services need to adopt that model?
ssh  ssl  tls  pki  crypto  end-to-end  pgp  security  surveillance 
august 2013 by jm
Python Infrastructure Status - SSL Verification Errors on PyPI
There appears to be a problem affecting a number of users where SSL verification errors will be shown saying "pypi.python.org" does not match "addvocate.com". As Best we can tell this appears to be related to the ISP. It seems to be affecting folks using O2 or O2 related companies. We've also reports of it affecting people using Free.

Cause appears to be one of the IP addresses returned in the Geo DNS for Europe returning a certificate for addvocate.com. It's not clear at this time *why* that IP address is returning a certificate for addvocate.com.

Turned out to be a routing loop in the fast.ly London POP (via Mick Twomey)
via:micktwomey  o2  censorship  filtering  internet  ssl  tls  pypi  python  geodns  pki 
july 2013 by jm
Analyzing Flame's MD5 Collision Attack [slides, PDF]
really detailed slide deck by Alex Sotirov, Co-Founder and Chief Scientist, Trail of Bits, Inc. (via Tony Finch) Plenty of security fail by MS, and also: PKI is clearly too hard
via:fanf  flame  security  malware  md5  collisions  hashing  pki  tls  ssl  microsoft 
june 2012 by jm
Convergence
'Convergence is a secure replacement for the Certificate Authority System. Rather than employing a traditionally hard-coded list of immutable CAs, Convergence allows you to configure a dynamic set of Notaries which use network perspective to validate your communication.
Convergence allows you to choose who you want to trust, rather than having someone else's decision forced on you. You can revise your trust decisions at any time, so that you're not locked in to trusting anyone for longer than you want.'
ssl  tls  trust  security  https  web  via:filippo  firefox  plugins  pki 
september 2011 by jm
The Monkeysphere Project
OpenPGP's web of trust extending further. 'Everyone who has used a web browser has been interrupted by the "Are you sure you want to connect?" warning message, which occurs when the browser finds the site's certificate unacceptable. But web browser vendors (e.g. Microsoft or Mozilla) should not be responsible for determining whom (or what) the user trusts to certify the authenticity of a website, or the identity of another user online. The user herself should have the final say, and designation of trust should be done on the basis of human interaction. The Monkeysphere project aims to make that possibility a reality.'
via:filippo  gpg  pki  security  software  ssh  ssl  web 
september 2011 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: