jm + patents   38

How the patent trolls won in Congress: Ars Technica
"We felt really good the last couple of days," said the tech lobbyist. "It was a good deal—one we could live with. Then the trial lawyers and pharma went to Senator Reid late this morning and said that's it. Enough with the children playing in the playground—go kill it."
ars-technica  patents  swpats  patent-trolls  pharma  tech  us-politics  congress  lawyers 
12 weeks ago by jm
'Monitoring and detecting causes of failures of network paths', US patent 8,661,295 (B1)
The first software patent in my name -- couldn't avoid it forever :(
Systems and methods are provided for monitoring and detecting causes of failures of network paths. The system collects performance information from a plurality of nodes and links in a network, aggregates the collected performance information across paths in the network, processes the aggregated performance information for detecting failures on the paths, analyzes each of the detected failures to determine at least one root cause, and initiates a remedial workflow for the at least one root cause determined. In some aspects, processing the aggregated information may include performing a statistical regression analysis or otherwise solving a set of equations for the performance indications on each of a plurality of paths. In another aspect, the system may also include an interface which makes available for display one or more of the network topology, the collected and aggregated performance information, and indications of the detected failures in the topology.


The patent describes an early version of Pimms, the network failure detection and remediation system we built for Amazon.
amazon  pimms  swpats  patents  networking  ospf  autoremediation  outage-detection 
may 2014 by jm
Transform any text into a patent application
'An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy. The devices comprises a good cage, a narrow gangway, an electric pocket, a flower-bedecked cage, an insensitive felt.' (The Hunger Artist by Kafka)
python  patents  text  language  generator 
may 2014 by jm
Actually, Mr. Waxman, Consumers Are Sued For Patent Infringement All the Time | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Patent trolls have sued or threatened to sue tens of thousands of end-users. For example, Innovatio attacked cafes, bakeries, and even a funeral parlor for using off-the-shelf Wi-Fi routers. And the notorious scanner troll, MPHJ, targeted small businesses and nonprofits around the country for using ordinary office equipment. As a recent paper explained: “Mass suits against technology customers have become too common, involving building block technologies like wi-fi, scanning, email and website technologies.”

The growth in patent suits against customers reveals the importance of the Limelight case. A ruling that made it even easier to sue customers (by allowing suits against someone who performs just some steps of a patent) would encourage patent trolls to launch more abusive litigation campaigns. We hope the Supreme Court will restore the sensible rule that only a single entity (or its agents) can infringe a patent.
patents  uspto  swpats  eff  consumer  law  legal  patent-infringement  scanners  wifi  printers 
may 2014 by jm
For world’s biggest troll, first patent case ends up in tatters
Love it. Intellectual Ventures suffers a major bloody nose in IV/Capital One patent-trolling litigation
trolls  patent-trolls  patents  swpats  capital-one  intellectual-ventures 
april 2014 by jm
Disgraced Scientist Granted U.S. Patent for Work Found to be Fraudulent - NYTimes.com
Korean researcher Hwang Woo-suk electrified the science world 10 years ago with his claim that he had created the world’s first cloned human embryos and had extracted stem cells from them. But the work was later found to be fraudulent, and Dr. Hwang was fired from his university and convicted of crimes.

Despite all that, Dr. Hwang has just been awarded an American patent covering the disputed work, leaving some scientists dumbfounded and providing fodder to critics who say the Patent Office is too lax.

“Shocked, that’s all I can say,” said Shoukhrat Mitalipov, a professor at Oregon Health and Science University who appears to have actually accomplished what Dr. Hwang claims to have done. “I thought somebody was kidding, but I guess they were not.”

Jeanne F. Loring, a stem cell scientist at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, said her first reaction was “You can’t patent something that doesn’t exist.” But, she said, she later realized that “you can.”
patents  absurd  hwang-woo-suk  cloning  stem-cells  science  biology  uspto 
february 2014 by jm
A patent on 'Birth of a Child By Centrifugal Force'
On November 9 1965, the Blonskys were granted US Patent 3,216,423, for an Apparatus for Facilitating the Birth of a Child by Centrifugal Force. The drawings, as well as the text, are a revelation. The Patent Office has them online at http://tinyurl.com/jd4ra and I urge you - if you have any shred of curiosity in your body - to look them up.

For conceiving what appears to be the greatest labour-saving device ever invented, George and Charlotte Blonsky won the 1999 Ig Nobel Prize in the field of Managed Health Care.


This is utterly bananas. (via christ)
via:christ  crazy  patents  1960s  centrifuge  birth  medicine  ignobels 
february 2014 by jm
Difference Engine: Obituary for software patents
The Economist reckons we're finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel where the patent troll shakedown is concerned:
If the use of state consumer-protection laws to ward off frivolous patent suits were to catch on, it could give the trolls serious pause for thought—especially if their mass mailings of threatening letters to businesses were met by dozens of law suits from attorneys general demanding their presence in state courts across the land. One way or another, things are beginning to look ominous for those who would exploit the inadequacies of America’s patent system.
the-economist  patents  swpats  trolls  us  east-texas  law 
december 2013 by jm
Jury: Newegg infringes Spangenberg patent, must pay $2.3 million | Ars Technica
Newegg, an online retailer that has made a name for itself fighting the non-practicing patent holders sometimes called "patent trolls," sits on the losing end of a lawsuit tonight. An eight-person jury came back shortly after 7:00pm and found that the company infringed all four asserted claims of a patent owned by TQP Development, a company owned by patent enforcement expert Erich Spangenberg.


"patent enforcement expert". That's one way to put it. This is insanity.
tech  swpats  patents  newegg  tqp  crypto  whitfield-diffie 
november 2013 by jm
Newegg trial: Crypto legend takes the stand, goes for knockout patent punch | Ars Technica

"We've heard a good bit in this courtroom about public key encryption," said Albright. "Are you familiar with that?

"Yes, I am," said Diffie, in what surely qualified as the biggest understatement of the trial.

"And how is it that you're familiar with public key encryption?"

"I invented it."


(via burritojustice)
crypto  tech  security  patents  swpats  pki  whitfield-diffie  history  east-texas  newegg  patent-trolls 
november 2013 by jm
Intellectual Ventures' Evil Knows No Bounds: Buys Patent AmEx Donated For Public Good... And Starts Suing
The problem with software patents, part XVII.
So you have a situation where even when the original patent holder donated the patent for "the public good," sooner or later, an obnoxious patent troll like IV comes along and turns it into a weapon.
Again: AmEx patented those little numbers on your credit card, and then for the good of the industry and consumer protection donated the patent to a non-profit, who promised not to enforce the patent against banks... and then proceeded to sell the patent to Intellectual Ventures who is now suing banks over it.
intellectual-ventures  scams  patents  swpats  shakedown  banking  cvv  american-express  banks  amex  cmaf 
october 2013 by jm
Patent troll Lodsys chickens out, folds case rather than face Eugene Kaspersky
In Kaspersky's view, patent trolls are no better than the extortionists who cropped up in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union, when crime ran rampant. Kaspersky saw more and more people becoming victims of various extortion schemes. US patent trolls seemed very similar. "Kaspersky's view was that paying patent trolls was like paying a protection racket," said Kniser. He wasn't going to do it.


yay! pity it didn't manage to establish precedent, though. But go Kaspersky!
eugene-kaspersky  shakedowns  law  east-texas  swpats  patents  patent-trolls 
october 2013 by jm
In historic vote, New Zealand bans software patents | Ars Technica
This is amazing news. Paying attention, Sean Sherlock?
A major new patent bill, passed in a 117-4 vote by New Zealand's Parliament after five years of debate, has banned software patents. The relevant clause of the patent bill actually states that a computer program is "not an invention." Some have suggested that was a way to get around the wording of the TRIPS intellectual property treaty, which requires patents to be "available for any inventions, whether products or processes, in all fields of technology." [...]

One Member of Parliament who was deeply involved in the debate, Clare Curran, quoted several heads of software firms complaining about how the patenting process allowed "obvious things" to get patented and that "in general software patents are counter-productive." Curran quoted one developer as saying, "It's near impossible for software to be developed without breaching some of the hundreds of thousands of patents granted around the world for obvious work."
"These are the heavyweights of the new economy in software development," said Curran. "These are the people that needed to be listened to, and thankfully, they were."
new-zealand  nz  patents  swpats  law  trips  ip  software-patents  yay 
august 2013 by jm
Branded to death | Features | Times Higher Education
The most abominable monster now threatening the intellectual health and the integrity of pure enquiry as well as conscientious teaching is the language of advertising, or better, the machinery of propaganda. Any number of critics from within university walls have warned the people at large and academics in particular of the way the helots of advertising and the state police of propaganda bloat and distort the language of thoughtful description, peddle with a confident air generalisations without substance, and serenely circulate orotund lies while ignoring their juniors’ rebuttals and abuse.


Relevant to this argument -- http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/07/the-webs-longest-nightmare-ends-eolas-patents-are-dead-on-appeal/ notes that 'the role of the University of California [was] one of the most perplexing twists in the Eolas saga. The university kept a low profile during the lead-up to trial; but once in Texas, Eolas' lawyers constantly reminded the jury they were asserting "these University of California patents." A lawyer from UC's patent-licensing division described support for Eolas at trial by simply saying that the university "stands by its licensees."'
branding  advertising  newspeak  universities  third-level  eolas  higher-education  education  research  university-of-california  ucb  patents  ip  swpats 
july 2013 by jm
The Web’s longest nightmare ends: Eolas patents are dead on appeal | Ars Technica
Ding dong, the troll is dead! Ars Technica with a great description of the Eolas web patent fiasco, and the UC system's sorry role. I blame Bayh-Dole for creating this insane mindset where places of learning are forced to "monetize" their research.
Under Doyle's conception of his own invention, practically any modern website owed him royalties. Playing a video online or rotating an image on a shopping website were "interactive" features that infringed his patents. And unlike many "patent trolls" who simply settle for settlements just under the cost of litigation, Doyle's company had the chops, the lawyers, and the early filing date needed to extract tens of millions of dollars from the accused companies. [...]

The role of the University of California is one of the most perplexing twists in the Eolas saga. The university kept a low profile during the lead-up to trial; but once in Texas, Eolas lawyers constantly reminded the jury they were asserting "these University of California patents." A lawyer from UC's patent-licensing division described support for Eolas at trial by simply saying that the university "stands by its licensees." (Eolas was technically an exclusive licensee of the UC-owned patent, which also gives it the right to sue.)

At the same time, the University of California, and the Berkeley campus in particular, was a key institution in creating early web technology. While UC lawyers cooperated with the plaintiffs, two UC Berkeley-trained computer scientists were key witnesses in the effort to demolish the Eolas patents.

Pei-Yuan Wei created the pioneering Viola browser, a key piece of prior art, while he was a student at UC-Berkeley in the early 1990s. Scott Silvey, another UC-Berkeley student at that time, testified about a program he made called VPlot, which allowed users to rotate an image of an airplane using Wei's browser. VPlot and Viola were demonstrated to Sun Microsystems in May 1993, months before Doyle claimed to have conceived of his invention.
patents  swpats  eolas  web  patent-trolls  ucb  universities  research  viola  plugins  berkeley 
july 2013 by jm
Newegg nukes “corporate troll” Alcatel in third patent appeal win this year
I am loving this. Particularly this:

At trial in East Texas Cheng took the stand to tell Newegg's story. Alcatel-Lucent's corporate representative, at the heart of its massive licensing campaign, couldn't even name the technology or the patents it was suing Newegg over.

"Successful defendants have their litigation managed by people who care," said Cheng. "For me, it's easy. I believe in Newegg, I care about Newegg. Alcatel Lucent, meanwhile, they drag out some random VP—who happens to be a decorated Navy veteran, who happens to be handsome and has a beautiful wife and kids—but the guy didn't know what patents were being asserted. What a joke."

"Shareholders of public companies that engage in patent trolling should ask themselves if they're really well-served by their management teams," Cheng added. "Are they properly monetizing their R&D? Surely there are better ways to make money than to just rely on litigating patents. If I was a shareholder, I would take a hard look as to whether their management was competent."
patents  ip  swpats  alcatel  bell-labs  newegg  east-texas  litigation  lucent 
may 2013 by jm
Meet the nice-guy lawyers who want $1,000 per worker for using scanners | Ars Technica
Great investigative journalism, interviewing the legal team behind the current big patent-troll shakedown; that on scanning documents with a button press, using a scanner attached to a network. They express whole-hearted belief in the legality of their actions, unsurprisingly -- they're exactly what you think they'd be like (via Nelson)
via:nelson  ethics  business  legal  patents  swpats  patent-trolls  texas  shakedown 
april 2013 by jm
How Copyright and Patent reform can make us all wealthier and safer - Events - IIEA - The Institute of International and European Affairs
Next April 11th, at the IIEA in North Gt Georges St:
Rick Falkvinge, founder of the Swedish Pirate Party, will examine the case for reform of copyright and patent law in the EU. Legalised file sharing, free sampling and shortened copyright protection times are the main elements of a proposal co-authored by Mr. Falkvinge which was submitted to the European Parliament in 2012. He will question whether, in the context of ever-increasing online activity, existing legal frameworks pose a threat to users’ civil liberties.
rick-falkvinge  pirate-party  ireland  iiea  dublin  copyright  patents  filesharing 
april 2013 by jm
The Patent Protection Racket
Joel On Software weighs in (via Tony Finch):
The fastest growing industry in the US right now, even during this time of slow economic growth, is probably the patent troll protection racket industry.
joel-on-software  patents  swpats  shakedown  extortion  us-politics  patent-trolls  via:fanf 
april 2013 by jm
East Texas Judge Says Mathematical Algorithms Can’t Be Patented, Dismisses Uniloc Claim Against Rackspace
This seems pretty significant. Is the tide turning in the Texas Eastern District against patent trolls, at last? And does it establish sufficient precedent?

A federal judge has thrown out a patent claim against Rackspace, ruling that mathematical algorithms can’t be patented. The ruling in the Eastern Disrict stemmed from a 2012 complaint filed by Uniloc USA asserting that processing of floating point numbers by the Linux operating system was a patent violation.

Chief Judge Leonard Davis based the ruling on U.S. Supreme Court case law that prohibits the patenting of mathematical algorithms. According to Rackspace, this is the first reported instance in which the Eastern District of Texas has granted an early motion to dismiss finding a patent invalid because it claimed unpatentable subject matter.

Red Hat, which supplies Linux to Rackspace, provided Rackspace’s defense. Red Hat has a policy of standing behind customers through its Open Source Assurance program.


See https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=5455869 for more discussion.
east-texas  patents  swpats  maths  patenting  law  judges  rackspace  linux  red-hat  uniloc-usa  floating-point 
march 2013 by jm
How the America Invents Act Will Change Patenting Forever
Bet you didn't think the US software patents situation could get worse? wrong!
“Now it’s really important to be the first to file, and it’s really important to file before somebody else puts a product out, or puts the invention in their product,” says Barr, adding that it will “create a new urgency on the part of everyone to file faster -- and that’s going to be a problem for the small inventor.”
first-to-file  omnishambles  uspto  swpats  patents  software-patents  law  legal 
march 2013 by jm
How Newegg crushed the “shopping cart” patent and saved online retail
Very cool account of Newegg's battle against a ludicrous patent-troll shakedown. Great quote from their Chief Legal Officer, Lee Cheng:
Patent trolling is based upon deficiencies in a critical, but underdeveloped, area of the law. The faster we drive these cases to verdict, and through appeal, and also get legislative reform on track, the faster our economy will be competitive in this critical area. We're competing with other economies that are not burdened with this type of litigation. China doesn't have this, South Korea doesn't have this, Europe doesn't have this. [...]

It's actually surprising how quickly people forget what Lemelson did. [referring to Jerome Lemelson, an infamous patent troll who used so-called "submarine patents" to make billions in licensing fees.] This activity is very similar. Trolls right now "submarine" as well. They use timing, like he used timing. Then they pop up and say "Hello, surprise! Give us your money or we will shut you down!" Screw them. Seriously, screw them. You can quote me on that.
patent-trolls  east-texas  newegg  shopping-cart  swpat  software-patents  patents  ecommerce  soverain 
january 2013 by jm
Patent trolls want $1,000 for using scanners
We are truly living in the future -- a dystopian future, but one nonetheless. A patent troll manages to obtain "gobbledigook" patents on using a scanner to scan to PDF, then attempts to shake down a bunch of small companies before eventually running into resistance, at which point it "forks" into a bunch of algorithmically-named shell companies, spammer-style, sending the same demands. Those demands in turn contain this beauty of Stockholm-syndrome-inducing prose:

'You should know also that we have had a positive response from the business community to our licensing program. As you can imagine, most businesses, upon being informed that they are infringing someone’s patent rights, are interested in operating lawfully and taking a license promptly. Many companies have responded to this licensing program in such a manner. Their doing so has allowed us to determine that a fair price for a license negotiated in good faith and without the need for court action is a payment of $900 per employee. We trust that your organization will agree to conform your behavior to respect our patent rights by negotiating a license rather than continuing to accept the benefits of our patented technology without a license. Assuming this is the case, we are prepared to make this pricing available to you.'


And here's an interesting bottom line:

The best strategy for target companies? It may be to ignore the letters, at least for now. “Ignorance, surprisingly, works,” noted Prof. Chien in an e-mail exchange with Ars.

Her study of startups targeted by patent trolls found that when confronted with a patent demand, 22 percent ignored it entirely. Compare that with the 35 percent that decided to fight back and 18 percent that folded. Ignoring the demand was the cheapest option ($3,000 on average) versus fighting in court, which was the most expensive ($870,000 on average).

Another tactic that clearly has an effect: speaking out, even when done anonymously. It hardly seems a coincidence that the Project Paperless patents were handed off to a web of generic-sounding LLCs, with demand letters signed only by “The Licensing Team,” shortly after the “Stop Project Paperless” website went up. It suggests those behind such low-level licensing campaigns aren’t proud of their behavior. And rightly so.
patents  via:fanf  networks  printing  printers  scanning  patent-trolls  project-paperless  adzpro  gosnel  faslan 
january 2013 by jm
On Patents
Notch comes up with a perfect analogy for software patents.
I am mostly fine with the concept of “selling stuff you made”, so I’m also against copyright infringement. I don’t think it’s quite as bad as theft, and I’m not sure it’s good for society that some professions can get paid over and over long after they did the work (say, in the case of a game developer), whereas others need to perform the job over and over to get paid (say, in the case of a hairdresser or a lawyer). But yeah, “selling stuff you made” is good. But there is no way in hell you can convince me that it’s beneficial for society to not share ideas. Ideas are free. They improve on old things, make them better, and this results in all of society being better. Sharing ideas is how we improve. A common argument for patents is that inventors won’t invent unless they can protect their ideas. The problem with this argument is that patents apply even if the infringer came up with the idea independently. If the idea is that easy to think of, why do we need to reward the person who happened to be first?

Of course, in reality it's even worse, since you don't actually have to be first to invent -- just first to file without sufficient people noticing, and people are actively dissuaded from noticing (since it makes their lives riskier if they know about the existence of patents)...
business  legal  ip  copyright  patents  notch  minecraft  patent-trolls 
july 2012 by jm
satellite rescue abandoned due to patents
'SES and Lockheed Martin explored ways to attempt to bring the functioning [AMC-14] satellite into its correct orbital position, and subsequently began attempting to move the satellite into geosynchronous orbit by means of a lunar flyby (as done a decade earlier with HGS-1). In April 2008, it was announced that this had been abandoned after it was discovered that Boeing held a patent on the trajectory that would be required. At the time, a lawsuit was ongoing between SES and Boeing, and Boeing refused to allow the trajectory to be used unless SES dropped its case.' In. credible. http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Boeing_Patent_Shuts_Down_AMC_14_Lunar_Flyby_Salvage_Attempt_999.html notes 'Industry sources have told SpaceDaily that the patent is regarded as legal "trite", as basic physics has been rebranded as a "process", and that the patent wouldn't stand up to any significant level of court scrutiny and was only registered at the time as "the patent office was incompetent when it came to space matters"', but still -- who'd want to go up in court against Boeing?
boeing  space  patenting  via:hn  funny  sad  lockheed-martin  ses  amc-14  business-process  patents 
may 2012 by jm
A one-line software patent – and a fix
Just another sad story of how software patenting made a standard useless. "I had once hoped that JBIG-KIT would help with the exchange of scanned documents on the Internet, facilitate online inter-library loans, and make paper archives more accessible to users all over the world. However, the impact was minimal: no web browser dared to directly support a standardized file format covered by 23 patents, the last of which expired today. About 25 years ago, large IT research organizations discovered standards as a gold mine, a vehicle to force users to buy patent licenses, not because the technology is any good, but because it is required for compatibility. This is achieved by writing the standards very carefully such that there is no way to come up with a compatible implementation that does not require a patent license, an art that has been greatly perfected since."
via:fanf  patents  jbig1  swpats  scanning  standards  rand  frand  licensing 
april 2012 by jm
The Free Universal Construction Kit | F.A.T.
'a set of adapters for complete interoperability between 10 popular construction toys.' this is like a patent-infringement lawsuit magnet, surely. Will make an interesting test case...
3d  design  open-source  freedom  free  toys  lego  3d-printing  patents 
march 2012 by jm
A Patent Lie: How Yahoo Weaponized My Work
'After we moved in, we were asked to file patents for anything and everything we’d invented while working on Upcoming.org.'
patents  swpat  upcoming  yahoo  ip  idiocy  warchest 
march 2012 by jm
_Intellectual property rights and innovation: Evidence from the human genome_ (PDF)
'Do intellectual property (IP) rights on existing technologies hinder subsequent
innovation? Using newly-collected data on the sequencing of the human genome by
the public Human Genome Project and the private rm Celera, this paper estimates
the impact of Celera's gene-level IP on subsequent scienti c research and product
development. Genes initially sequenced by Celera were held with IP for up to two
years, but moved into the public domain once re-sequenced by the public e ort.
Across a range of empirical speci cations, I nd evidence that Celera's IP led to
reductions in subsequent scienti c research and product development on the order of
20 to 30 percent. Taken together, these results suggest that Celera's short-term IP
had persistent negative e ects on subsequent innovation relative to a counterfactual
of Celera genes having always been in the public domain.' (via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  genetics  ip  copyright  open-source  celera  patents  papers  pdf 
february 2012 by jm
'What Idiot Wrote The Patent That Might Invalidate Software Patents? Oh, Wait, That Was Me' | Techdirt
'So I was thinking - great they invalidated software patents, lets see what crappy patent written by an idiot they picked to do it - then I realized the idiot in question was me :-)

Not sure how I feel about this.

John - inventor of the patent in question.'
patents  swpats  reform  usa  software-development  coding  funny  techdirt 
august 2011 by jm
France To Launch a National Patent Troll
'The operation, called "France Brevets" will buy up patents from small operation and put the French government in charge of [...] shaking down companies for money.' I think the word is: incroyable
france  fail  omgwtfbbq  patent-trolls  swpats  patents  government  innovation  software  europe 
june 2011 by jm
The Hargreaves Report
'The publication of Digital Opportunity follows a six-month independent review of IP and Growth, led by Professor Ian Hargreaves. He was asked to consider how the national and international IP system can best work to promote innovation and growth.' Some fantastic recommendations here. I hope this provides clear direction to similar Irish efforts...
ip  law  hargreaves  uk  patents  copyright 
may 2011 by jm
RunwayFinder shut down by patent trolls
“While we appreciate your offer to shut down the website to stop future infringement, we notice that your website is still operation. And without further information from you, our only means to assess the potential damages is the observation that your website had 22,256 unique visitors in July 2010. Each visit represents a potential lost sale of our client’s patented invention at $149 per sale. This damage calculation exceeds $3.2 million per month in lost revenue.”
patents  swpats  patent-trolls  flightprep  runwayfinder  aviation  web  law  from delicious
december 2010 by jm
Why We Need To Abolish Software Patents
'Pam Samuelson, one of the co-authors of the report, says that her conclusion from the research is that the world may be better off without software patents; that the biggest beneficiaries of software patents are patent lawyers and patent trolls, not entrepreneurs.' no shit, Sherlock
ip  patents  techcrunch  startups  swpats  via:brian-caulfield  software  from delicious
august 2010 by jm
XOR patent killed Commodore-Amiga
'Apparently Commodore-Amiga owed $10M for patent infringement. Because of that, the US government wouldn't allow any CD-32's into the USA. And because of that, the Phillippines factory seized all of the CD-32's that had been manufactured to cover unpaid expenses. And that was the end'
cd32  commodore  computers  history  ip  patents  software  swpats  xor  amiga  from delicious
july 2010 by jm
WebM
open audio/video for the web, from Google; VP8 video codec, Ogg for audio, and a subset of Matroska as the container format. still a patents minefield, though, I'd guess
codec  foss  google  open-source  patents  audio  video  vp8  webm  standards  mozilla  open  web  from delicious
may 2010 by jm
Total victory for open source software in a patent lawsuit
yay, Red Hat beat down patent troll IP Innovation, L.L.C. (a subsidiary of Acacia Technologies), in East Texas no less
ip  law  legal  novell  linux  open-source  patents  redhat  swpats  uspto  acacia-technologies  from delicious
may 2010 by jm
Why Our Civilization's Video Art and Culture is Threatened by the MPEG-LA
incredible. Almost every single modern camera capable of recording video now requires that you obtain a license from MPEG-LA to use recorded footage for commercial purposes. These clauses are currently not enforced, but could be. Horrifying (via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  patents  mpeg2  codec  compression  consumer-rights  copyright  legal  law  mpeg  h264  mpegla  codecs  from delicious
may 2010 by jm

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