jm + paintings   5

Michael Kagan | Prints
'Heavily tinted blue paintings form space stations, spacesuits, and rockets just after blast. Michael Kagan paints these large-scale works to celebrate the man-made object—machinery that both protects and holds the possibility of instantly killing those that operate the equipment from the inside. To paint the large works, Kagan utilizes an impasto technique with thick strokes that are deliberate and unique, showing an aggression in his application of oil paint on linen. The New York-based artist focuses on iconic images in his practice, switching back and forth between abstract and representational styles. “The painting is finished when it can fall apart and come back together depending on how it is read and the closeness to the work,” said Kagan about his work. “Each painting is an image, a snapshot, a flash moment, a quick read that is locked into memory by the iconic silhouettes.”'

Via http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/08/michael-kagens-space-paintings/
paintings  prints  art  michael-kagan  space  abstract-art  tobuy 
september 2015 by jm
The Getty Museum offers a huge chunk of their collection for free use
We’ve launched the Open Content Program to share, freely and without restriction, as many of the Getty’s digital resources as possible. The initial focus of the Open Content Program is to make available all images of public domain artworks in the Getty’s collections. Today we’ve taken a first step toward this goal by making roughly 4,600 high-resolution images of the Museum’s collection free to use, modify, and publish for any purpose.

Why open content? Why now? The Getty was founded on the conviction that understanding art makes the world a better place, and sharing our digital resources is the natural extension of that belief. This move is also an educational imperative. Artists, students, teachers, writers, and countless others rely on artwork images to learn, tell stories, exchange ideas, and feed their own creativity. In its discussion of open content, the most recent Horizon Report, Museum Edition stated that “it is now the mark—and social responsibility—of world-class institutions to develop and share free cultural and educational resources.” I agree wholeheartedly.
getty  art  via:tupp_ed  open-content  free  images  pictures  paintings  museums 
august 2013 by jm
Werner Knaupp - Acrylbilder
my favourite art of the moment. Thick, heavy layers of acrylic black and white paint, evoking the stormy Atlantic (brr). Gallery Bode, which showed this in Nuremberg in 2011, wrote the following at http://www.bode-galerie.de/en/exhibitions/schwarz_weiss :

Gallery Bode is pleased to constitute the cooperation with Werner Knaupp with an exhibition of a new workseries. The exhibition showcases artworks out of the series "Westmen Isles". [...]

The journeys to Iceland are a background to the development of this new workseries.
These paintings are telling of a forbidding nature. The beholder can't take a [safe] position but he is involved into the event which becomes comprehensible in a nearly physical way. These pictures of a overwhelming nature could be traced back to Knaupp's confrontation with the force of nature while his journeys. The experience of this force pushes the limits of human being and evokes primal fear.
With the abdication of colours the artworks reach dynamic. This foots on the consistency of colour and on the changing between reality and abstraction.

In an art historical view the new black and white paintings detached themselves from traditional landscape painting. Werner Knaupp implements the pure force of nature into pure painting, to visualise the force fields of nature. The beholder experiences with these artworks a nature without human dimension. In Werner Knaupp's Oeuvre the "Westmen Isles" paintings are a new expression of his examination with existential fundamental questions.
germany  art  painting  werner-knaupp  paintings  monochrome  sea  iceland 
february 2013 by jm

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