jm + packets + linux   3

How to receive a million packets per second on Linux

To sum up, if you want a perfect performance you need to:
Ensure traffic is distributed evenly across many RX queues and SO_REUSEPORT processes. In practice, the load usually is well distributed as long as there are a large number of connections (or flows).
You need to have enough spare CPU capacity to actually pick up the packets from the kernel.
To make the things harder, both RX queues and receiver processes should be on a single NUMA node.
linux  networking  performance  cloudflare  packets  numa  so_reuseport  sockets  udp 
june 2015 by jm
The Discovery of Apache ZooKeeper's Poison Packet - PagerDuty
Excellent deep dive into a production issue. Root causes: crappy error handling code in Zookeeper; lack of bounds checking in ZK; and a nasty kernel bug.
zookeeper  bugs  error-handling  bounds-checking  oom  poison-packets  pagerduty  packets  tcpdump  xen  aes  linux  kernel 
may 2015 by jm
Chris Baus: TCP_CORK: More than you ever wanted to know
Even with buffered streams the application must be able to instruct the OS to forward all pending data when the stream has been flushed for optimal performance. The application does not know where packet boundaries reside, hence buffer flushes might not align on packet boundaries. TCP_CORK can pack data more effectively, because it has direct access to the TCP/IP layer. [..]

If you do use an application buffering and streaming mechanism (as does Apache), I highly recommend applying the TCP_NODELAY socket option which disables Nagle's algorithm. All calls to write() will then result in immediate transfer of data.
networking  tcp  via:nmaurer  performance  ip  tcp_cork  linux  syscalls  writev  tcp_nodelay  nagle  packets 
september 2014 by jm

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