jm + open-source   137

Open-sourcing RacerD: Fast static race detection at scale | Engineering Blog | Facebook Code
At Facebook we have been working on automated reasoning about concurrency in our work with the Infer static analyzer. RacerD, our new open source race detector, searches for data races — unsynchronized memory accesses, where one is a write — in Java programs, and it does this without running the program it is analyzing. RacerD employs symbolic reasoning to cover many paths through an app, quickly.


This sounds extremely interesting...
racerd  race-conditions  data-races  thread-safety  static-code-analysis  coding  testing  facebook  open-source  infer 
5 weeks ago by jm
Abseil
a new common C++ library from Google, Apache-licensed.
c++  coding  abseil  google  commons  libraries  open-source  asl2  c++17 
8 weeks ago by jm
The React license for founders and CTOs – James Ide – Medium
Decent explanation of _why_ Facebook came up with the BSD+Patents license: "Facebook’s patent grant is about sharing its code while preserving its ability to defend itself against patent lawsuits."
The difficulty of open sourcing code at Facebook, including React in 2013, was one of the reasons the company’s open-source contributions used to be a fraction of what they are today. It didn’t use to have a strong reputation as an open-source contributor to front-end technologies. Facebook wanted to open source code, though; when it grew communities for projects like React, core contributors emerged to help out and interview candidates often cited React and other Facebook open source as one of the reasons they were interested in applying. People at Facebook wanted to make it easier to open source code and not worry as much about patents. Facebook’s solution was the Facebook BSD+Patents license.
facebook  bsd  licenses  licensing  asf  patents  swpats  react  license  software-patents  open-source  rocksdb 
10 weeks ago by jm
bet365 to save Riak
'It is our intention to open source all of Basho's products and all of
the source code that they have been working on. We'll do this as quickly as
we are able to organise it, and we would appreciate some input from the
community on how you would like this done.'
oss  riak  basho  storage  open-source  bet365 
12 weeks ago by jm
Fsq.io
Foursquare's open source repo, where they extract reusable components for open sourcing -- I like the approach of using a separate top level module path for OSS bits
open-source  oss  foursquare  libraries  maintainance  coding  git  monorepos 
august 2017 by jm
Hyperscan
a high-performance multiple regex matching library. It follows the regular expression syntax of the commonly-used libpcre library, yet functions as a standalone library with its own API written in C. Hyperscan uses hybrid automata techniques to allow simultaneous matching of large numbers (up to tens of thousands) of regular expressions, as well as matching of regular expressions across streams of data. Hyperscan is typically used in a DPI library stack.

Hyperscan began in 2008, and evolved from a commercial closed-source product 2009-2015. First developed at Sensory Networks Incorporated, and later acquired and released as open source software by Intel in October 2015. 

Hyperscan is under a 3-clause BSD license. We welcome outside contributors.


This is really impressive -- state of the art in parallel regexp matching has improved quite a lot since I was last looking at it.

(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  regexps  regular-expressions  text  matching  pattern-matching  intel  open-source  bsd  c  dpi  scanning  sensory-networks 
august 2017 by jm
Nextflow - A DSL for parallel and scalable computational pipelines
Data-driven computational pipelines

Nextflow enables scalable and reproducible scientific workflows using software containers. It allows the adaptation of pipelines written in the most common scripting languages.

Its fluent DSL simplifies the implementation and the deployment of complex parallel and reactive workflows on clouds and clusters.


GPLv3 licensed, open source
computation  workflows  pipelines  batch  docker  ops  open-source 
august 2017 by jm
[LEGAL-303] ASF, RocksDB, and Facebook's BSD+patent grant licensing
Facebook's licensing includes a "nuclear option" if a user acts in a way interpreted by Facebook as competing with them; the ASF has marked the license as "Category-X", and may not be included in Apache projects as a result. Looks like RocksDB are going to relicense as dual GPLv2/ASL2 to clear this up, but React.js has not shown any plans to do so yet
react  rocksdb  licensing  asl2  apache  asf  facebook  open-source  patents 
july 2017 by jm
One Man's Plan to Make Sure Gene Editing Doesn't Go Haywire - The Atlantic
Open science - radical transparency where gene-editing and CRISPR is involved. Sounds great.
“For gene drive, the closed-door model is morally unacceptable. You don’t have the right to go into your lab and build something that is ineluctably designed to affect entire ecosystems. If it escapes into the wild, it would be expected to spread and affect people’s lives in unknown ways. Doing that in secret denies people a voice.”

Also this is a little scary:

in 2015, he was shocked to read a paper, due to be published in ... Science, in which Californian researchers had inadvertently created a gene drive in fruit flies, without knowing what gene drives are. They developed it as a research tool for spreading a trait among lab populations, and had no ambitions to alter wild animals. And yet, if any of their insects had escaped, that’s what would have happened.
science  openness  open-source  visibility  transparency  crispr  gene-editing  mice  nantucket  gene-drive 
july 2017 by jm
The Guardian view on patient data: we need a better approach | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian

The use of privacy law to curb the tech giants in this instance, or of competition law in the case of the EU’s dispute with Google, both feel slightly maladapted. They do not address the real worry. It is not enough to say that the algorithms DeepMind develops will benefit patients and save lives. What matters is that they will belong to a private monopoly which developed them using public resources. If software promises to save lives on the scale that drugs now can, big data may be expected to behave as big pharma has done. We are still at the beginning of this revolution and small choices now may turn out to have gigantic consequences later. A long struggle will be needed to avoid a future of digital feudalism. Dame Elizabeth’s report is a welcome start.


Hear hear.
privacy  law  uk  nhs  data  google  deepmind  healthcare  tech  open-source 
july 2017 by jm
A federal court has ruled that an open-source license is an enforceable contract — Quartz
“Not so,” said Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley in her order on the motion on April 25. Corley said the GNU GPL “provides that the Ghostscript user agrees to its terms if the user does not obtain a commercial license. Plaintiff alleges that Defendant used Ghostscript, did not obtain a commercial license, and represented publicly that its use of Ghostscript was licensed under the GNL GPU. These allegations sufficiently plead the existence of a contract.”
open-source  oss  ghostscript  gnu  gpl  licenses  contracts  law 
may 2017 by jm
React’s license: necessary and open?
Luis Villa:

'Is the React license elegant? No. Should you be worried about using it? Probably not. If anything, Facebook’s attempt to give users an explicit patent license should probably be seen as a good faith gesture that builds some confidence in their ecosystem. But yeah, don’t use it if your company intends to invest heavily in React and also sue Facebook over unrelated patents. That… would be dumb. :)'
luis-villa  open-source  react  facebook  patents  swpats  licensing  licenses  bsd 
november 2016 by jm
Raintank investing in Graphite
paying Jason Dixon to work on it, improving the backend, possibly replacing the creaky Whisper format. great news!
graphite  metrics  monitoring  ops  open-source  grafana  raintank 
july 2016 by jm
What's Actually Wrong with Yahoo's Purchase of Summly
An old post about Y!'s acquisition of Summly, an iPhone app which uses NLP to summarise news stories. This is an excellent point about modern tech startups:
[Summly] licensed the core engine from another company. They are the quintessential bolt-on engineers, taking a Japanese bike engine, slapping together a badly constructed frame aligned solely by eyeballs, and laying down a marketing blitz. That's why the story sells. "You, too, can do it." But do you want to? [...] it's critical to keep tabs on the ratio known as "glue versus thought." Sure, both imply progress and both are necessary. But the former is eminently mundane, replaceable, and outsource-able. The latter is typically what gives a company its edge, what is generally regarded as a competitive advantage. So, what is Yahoo signaling to the world? "We value glue more than thought."
glue  thought  glue-vs-thought  summly  yahoo  acquisitions  licensing  tech  startups  outsourcing  open-source 
june 2016 by jm
Open Sourcing Twitter Heron
Twitter are open sourcing their Storm replacement, and moving it to an independent open source foundation
open-source  twitter  heron  storm  streaming  architecture  lambda-architecture 
may 2016 by jm
Anti-innovation: EU excludes open source from new tech standards
EC up to its old anti-competitive tricks:
The European Commission is surprisingly coy about what exactly ['open'] means in this context. It is only on the penultimate page of the ICT Standardisation Priorities document that we finally read the following key piece of information: "ICT standardisation requires a balanced IPR [intellectual property rights] policy, based on FRAND licensing terms."

It's no surprise that the Commission was trying to keep that particular detail quiet, because FRAND licensing—the acronym stands for "fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory"—is incompatible with open source, which will therefore find itself excluded from much of the EU's grand new Digital Single Market strategy. That's hardly a "balanced IPR policy."
open-source  open  frand  eu  ec 
april 2016 by jm
3d Printing Is Not For You
I would only recommend 3d printing to someone who wanted a hobby, and wanted that hobby to be 3d printing, not "having parts made on a 3d printer". The printing itself is the activity. If you have any other primary motivation your parts will fail more often than they'll succeed.


(via burritojustice)
via:burritojustice  3d-printing  machines  parts  things  hobbies  open-source  funny 
april 2016 by jm
US government commits to publish publicly financed software under Free Software licenses
Wow, this is significant:
At the end of last week, the White House published a draft for a Source Code Policy. The policy requires every public agency to publish their custom-build software as Free Software for other public agencies as well as the general public to use, study, share and improve the software. At the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) we believe that the European Union, and European member states should implement similar policies. Therefore we are interested in your feedback to the US draft.
government  open-source  coding  licenses  fsf  free-software  source-code  us-politics  usa 
april 2016 by jm
DIY DOG
BrewDog releases their beer recipes for free. so cool!

'So here it is. The keys to our kingdom. Every single BrewDog recipe, ever. So copy them, tear them to pieces, bastardise them, adapt them, but most of all, enjoy them. They are well travelled but with plenty of miles still left on the clock. Just remember to share your brews, and share your results. Sharing is caring.'
brewing  homebrew  beer  brewdog  open-source  free  sharing 
february 2016 by jm
go-kit
Dropwizard for Go, basically:
a distributed programming toolkit for building microservices in large organizations. We solve common problems in distributed systems, so you can focus on your business logic.
microservices  go  golang  http  libraries  open-source  rpc  circuit-breakers 
january 2016 by jm
How open-source software developers helped end the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone
Little known to the rest of the world, a team of open source software developers played a small but integral part in helping to stop the spread of Ebola in Sierra Leone, solving a payroll crisis that was hindering the fight against the disease.

Emerson Tan from NetHope, a consortium of NGOs working in IT and development, told the tale at the Chaos Communications Congress in Hamburg, Germany. “These guys basically saved their country from complete collapse. I can’t overestimate how many lives they saved,” he said about his co-presenters, Salton Arthur Massally, Harold Valentine Mac-Saidu and Francis Banguara, who appeared over video link.
open-source  software  coding  payroll  sierra-leone  ebola  ccc 
january 2016 by jm
Open-sourcing PalDB, a lightweight companion for storing side data
a new LinkedIn open source data store, for write-once/read-mainly side data, java, Apache licensed.

RocksDB discussion: https://www.facebook.com/groups/rocksdb.dev/permalink/834956096602906/
linkedin  open-source  storage  side-data  data  config  paldb  java  apache  databases 
october 2015 by jm
fabio
fast, modern, zero-conf load balancing HTTP(S) router managed by consul; serves 15k reqs/sec, in Go, from eBay
load-balancing  consul  http  https  routing  ebay  go  open-source  fabio 
october 2015 by jm
Hologram
Hologram exposes an imitation of the EC2 instance metadata service on developer workstations that supports the [IAM Roles] temporary credentials workflow. It is accessible via the same HTTP endpoint to calling SDKs, so your code can use the same process in both development and production. The keys that Hologram provisions are temporary, so EC2 access can be centrally controlled without direct administrative access to developer workstations.
iam  roles  ec2  authorization  aws  adroll  open-source  cli  osx  coding  dev 
october 2015 by jm
librato/disco-java
Librato's service discovery library using Zookeeper (so strongly consistent, but with the ZK downside that an AZ outage can stall service discovery updates region-wide)
zookeeper  service-discovery  librato  java  open-source  load-balancing 
october 2015 by jm
excellent offline mapping app MAPS.ME goes open source
"MAPS.ME is an open source cross-platform offline maps application, built on top of crowd-sourced OpenStreetMap data. It was publicly released for iOS and Android."
maps.me  mapping  maps  open-source  apache  ios  android  mobile 
september 2015 by jm
The price of the Internet of Things will be a vague dread of a malicious world
So the fact is that our experience of the world will increasingly come to reflect our experience of our computers and of the internet itself (not surprisingly, as it’ll be infused with both). Just as any user feels their computer to be a fairly unpredictable device full of programs they’ve never installed doing unknown things to which they’ve never agreed to benefit companies they’ve never heard of, inefficiently at best and actively malignant at worst (but how would you now?), cars, street lights, and even buildings will behave in the same vaguely suspicious way. Is your self-driving car deliberately slowing down to give priority to the higher-priced models? Is your green A/C really less efficient with a thermostat from a different company, or it’s just not trying as hard? And your tv is supposed to only use its camera to follow your gestural commands, but it’s a bit suspicious how it always offers Disney downloads when your children are sitting in front of it. None of those things are likely to be legal, but they are going to be profitable, and, with objects working actively to hide them from the government, not to mention from you, they’ll be hard to catch.
culture  bots  criticism  ieet  iot  internet-of-things  law  regulation  open-source  appliances 
september 2015 by jm
EPA opposed rules that would have exposed VW's cheating
[...] Two months ago, the EPA opposed some proposed measures that would help potentially expose subversive code like the so-called “defeat device” software VW allegedly used by allowing consumers and researchers to legally reverse-engineer the code used in vehicles. EPA opposed this, ironically, because the agency felt that allowing people to examine the software code in vehicles would potentially allow car owners to alter the software in ways that would produce more emissions in violation of the Clean Air Act. The issue involves the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DCMA), which prohibits anyone from working around “technological protection measures” that limit access to copyrighted works. The Library of Congress, which oversees copyrights, can issue exemptions to those prohibitions that would make it legal, for example, for researchers to examine the code to uncover security vulnerabilities.
dmca  volkswagen  vw  law  code  open-source  air-quality  diesel  cheating  regulation  us-politics 
september 2015 by jm
Stormpot
an object pooling library for Java. Use it to recycle objects that are expensive to create. The library will take care of creating and destroying your objects in the background. Stormpot is very mature, is used in production, and has done over a trillion claim-release cycles in testing. It is faster and scales better than any competing pool.


Apache-licensed, and extremely fast: https://medium.com/@chrisvest/released-stormpot-2-4-eeab4aec86d0
java  stormpot  object-pooling  object-pools  pools  allocation  gc  open-source  apache  performance 
september 2015 by jm
Airflow
Airbnb's workflow management system; works off a DAG defined in Python code (ugh). Nice UI though, but I think Pinboard's take is neater
airbnb  open-source  python  workflow  jobs  cron  scheduling  batch 
june 2015 by jm
Red Hat on rkt vs Docker
This is like watching a train-wreck in slow motion on Groundhog Day. We, in the broader Linux and open source community, have been down this path multiple times over the past fifteen years, specifically with package formats. While there needs to be room for experimentation, having two incompatible specs driven by two startups trying to differentiate and in direct competition is *not* a good thing. It would be better for the community and for everyone who depends on our collective efforts if CoreOS and Docker collaborated on a standardized common spec, image format, and distribution protocol. To this end, we at Red Hat will continue to contribute to both initiatives with the goal of driving convergence.
rkt  docker  appc  coreos  red-hat  dpkg  rpm  linux  packaging  collaboration  open-source 
may 2015 by jm
StackShare
'Discover and discuss the best dev tools and cloud infrastructure services' -- fun!
stackshare  architecture  stack  ops  software  ranking  open-source 
april 2015 by jm
tebeka / fastavro / issues / #11 - fastavro breaks dumping binary fixed [4] — Bitbucket
The Python "fastavro" library cannot correctly render "bytes" fields. This is a bug, and the maintainer is acting in a really crappy manner in this thread. Avoid this library
fastavro  fail  bugs  utf-8  bytes  encoding  asshats  open-source  python 
march 2015 by jm
Bazel
Google open sources a key part of their internal build system (internally called "Blaze" it seems for a while). Very nice indeed!
blaze  bazel  build-tools  building  open-source  google  coding  packaging 
march 2015 by jm
Release Protocol Buffers v3.0.0-alpha-2 · google/protobuf
New major-version track for protobuf, with some interesting new features:

Removal of field presence logic for primitive value fields, removal of required fields, and removal of default values. This makes proto3 significantly easier to implement with open struct representations, as in languages like Android Java, Objective C, or Go.
Removal of unknown fields.
Removal of extensions, which are instead replaced by a new standard type called Any.
Fix semantics for unknown enum values.
Addition of maps.
Addition of a small set of standard types for representation of time, dynamic data, etc.
A well-defined encoding in JSON as an alternative to binary proto encoding.
protobuf  binary  marshalling  serialization  google  grpc  proto3  coding  open-source 
february 2015 by jm
Why we run an open source program - Walmart Labs
This is a great exposition of why it's in a company's interest to engage with open source. Not sure I agree with 'engineers are the artists of our generation' but the rest are spot on
development  open-source  walmart  node  coding  via:hn  hiring 
february 2015 by jm
One year of InfluxDB and the road to 1.0
half of the [Monitorama] attendees were employees and entrepreneurs at monitoring, metrics, DevOps, and server analytics companies. Most of them had a story about how their metrics API was their key intellectual property that took them years to develop. The other half of the attendees were developers at larger organizations that were rolling their own DevOps stack from a collection of open source tools. Almost all of them were creating a “time series database” with a bunch of web services code on top of some other database or just using Graphite. When everyone is repeating the same work, it’s not key intellectual property or a differentiator, it’s a barrier to entry. Not only that, it’s something that is hindering innovation in this space since everyone has to spend their first year or two getting to the point where they can start building something real. It’s like building a web company in 1998. You have to spend millions of dollars and a year building infrastructure, racking servers, and getting everything ready before you could run the application. Monitoring and analytics applications should not be like this.
graphite  monitoring  metrics  tsd  time-series  analytics  influxdb  open-source 
february 2015 by jm
Performance Co-Pilot
System performance metrics framework, plugged by Netflix, open-source for ages
open-source  pcp  performance  system  metrics  ops  red-hat  netflix 
february 2015 by jm
RateLimitedLogger
Our latest open source release from Swrve Labs: an Apache-licensed, SLF4J-compatible, simple, fluent API for rate-limited logging in Java:

'A RateLimitedLog object tracks the rate of log message emission, imposes an internal rate limit, and will efficiently suppress logging if this is exceeded. When a log is suppressed, at the end of the limit period, another log message is output indicating how many log lines were suppressed. This style of rate limiting is the same as the one used by UNIX syslog; this means it should be comprehensible, easy to predict, and familiar to many users, unlike more complex adaptive rate limits.'

We've been using this in production for months -- it's pretty nifty ;) Never fear your logs again!
logs  logging  coding  java  open-source  swrve  slf4j  rate-limiting  libraries 
february 2015 by jm
Publishing from GitHub to Maven Central
A good starting point. This looks bloody complex :(
maven  sonatype  gradle  jar  open-source  github  release  gpg 
january 2015 by jm
Your anonymous code contributions probably aren't
Scraping the work of successful contributors to the Google Code Jam competition, the researchers found that a mere eight training files with 70 lines of code each were enough to identify authors based in their syntactic, lexical, and layout habits.
anonymous  coding  open-source  google-code-jam  research  fingerprinting 
january 2015 by jm
From Gongkai to Open Source
This is an amazing post from Bunnie Huang, reverse engineering the Mediatek MT6260 to make "Fernvale", an open, hackable reference platform. Also worth noting for the "facts are not copyrightable" section regarding the legality of extracting memory locations and bitmasks from a copyrighted include file...

'We released Fernvale because we think it’s imperative to exercise our fair use rights to reverse engineer and create interoperable, open source solutions. Rights tend to atrophy and get squeezed out by competing interests if they are not vigorously exercised; for decades engineers have sat on the sidelines and seen ever more expansive patent and copyright laws shrink their latitude to learn freely and to innovate. I am saddened that the formative tinkering I did as a child is no longer a legal option for the next generation of engineers. The rise of the Shanzhai and their amazing capabilities is a wake-up call. I see it as evidence that a permissive IP environment spurs innovation, especially at the grass-roots level. If more engineers become aware of their fair use rights, and exercise them vigorously and deliberately, perhaps this can catalyze a larger and much-needed reform of the patent and copyright system.'

Freedom to tinker!
opensource  china  gongkai  tinkering  reverse-engineering  bunnie-huang  open-source  mediatek  copyright  facts  fair-use  shanzhai  patents 
december 2014 by jm
mermaid
Generate graphs/flowcharts from text a la Markdown. Pretty much identical to graphviz surely?
mermaid  graphviz  markdown  cli  open-source 
december 2014 by jm
CoreOS is building a container runtime, Rocket
Whoa, trouble at mill in Dockerland!
When Docker was first introduced to us in early 2013, the idea of a “standard container” was striking and immediately attractive: a simple component, a composable unit, that could be used in a variety of systems. The Docker repository included a manifesto of what a standard container should be. This was a rally cry to the industry, and we quickly followed. Brandon Philips, co-founder/CTO of CoreOS, became a top Docker contributor, and now serves on the Docker governance board. CoreOS is one of the most widely used platforms for Docker containers, and ships releases to the community hours after they happen upstream. We thought Docker would become a simple unit that we can all agree on.

Unfortunately, a simple re-usable component is not how things are playing out. Docker now is building tools for launching cloud servers, systems for clustering, and a wide range of functions: building images, running images, uploading, downloading, and eventually even overlay networking, all compiled into one monolithic binary running primarily as root on your server. The standard container manifesto was removed. We should stop talking about Docker containers, and start talking about the Docker Platform. It is not becoming the simple composable building block we had envisioned.
coreos  docker  linux  containers  open-source  politics  rocket 
december 2014 by jm
Charted
Charted is a tool for automatically visualizing data, created by the
Product Science team at Medium. Give it the link to a data file and Charted returns a beautiful, shareable chart of the data.


Nice, but it's no graphite -- pretty basic.
charted  graphs  charts  ui  open-source  medium 
november 2014 by jm
"Aeron: High-Performance Open Source Message Transport" [slides, PDF]
a new networked pub/sub library from Martin "Disruptor" Thompson, based around a replicated, persistent log of messages, with exceptionally low latency. Apache-licensed. Very similar to the realtime messaging stack we've built in Swrve. ;)

https://github.com/real-logic/Aeron
realtime  messaging  pub-sub  ipc  queues  transports  martin-thompson  slides  latencies  open-source  java  libraries 
november 2014 by jm
Help the GNOME Foundation defend the GNOME trademark
Recently Groupon announced a product with the same product name as GNOME. Groupon’s product is a tablet based point of sale “operating system for merchants to run their entire operation." The GNOME community was shocked that Groupon would use our mark for a product so closely related to the GNOME desktop and technology. It was almost inconceivable to us that Groupon, with over $2.5 billion in annual revenue, a full legal team and a huge engineering staff would not have heard of the GNOME project, found our trademark registration using a casual search, or even found our website, but we nevertheless got in touch with them and asked them to pick another name. Not only did Groupon refuse, but it has now filed even more trademark applications (the full list of applications they filed can be found here, here and here). To use the GNOME name for a proprietary software product that is antithetical to the fundamental ideas of the GNOME community, the free software community and the GNU project is outrageous. Please help us fight this huge company as they try to trade on our goodwill and hard earned reputation.
gnome  groupon  trademark  infringement  open-source  operating-systems  ip  law  floss 
november 2014 by jm
Need To Know 1999-11-05
15 years ago today -- Sitescooper appeared in NTK!
Official NTK policy is that if you're not reading this in
its definitive, non-proportional e-mail form, you're a
fricking girl. And all the best fricking girls these days
have a Palm, so JUSTIN MASON has been kindly running the Web
page through his brilliant sitescooper (aka snarfnews)
program, and dumping the results for download at his site.
NTK is available in DOC and iSilo formats, as are all kinds
of other girlish, lavender-smelling Websites you may want to
read, like The Register and the Linux Weekly News. And "Dr
Koop's Health News".
ntk  history  hacking  sitescooper  palm-pilot  open-source  1999 
november 2014 by jm
Announcing Confluent, A Company for Apache Kafka And Realtime Data
Jay Kreps, Neha Narkhede, and Jun Rao are leaving LinkedIn to form a Kafka-oriented realtime event processing company
realtime  event-processing  logs  kafka  streaming  open-source  jay-kreps  jun-rao  confluent 
november 2014 by jm
Jauter
This Java library can route paths to targets and create paths from targets and params (reverse routing). This library is tiny, without additional dependencies, and is intended for use together with an HTTP server side library. If you want to use with Netty, see netty-router.
java  jauter  scala  request-routing  http  netty  open-source 
october 2014 by jm
FelixGV/tehuti
Felix says:

'Like I said, I'd like to move it to a more general / non-personal repo in the future, but haven't had the time yet. Anyway, you can still browse the code there for now. It is not a big code base so not that hard to wrap one's mind around it.

It is Apache licensed and both Kafka and Voldemort are using it so I would say it is pretty self-contained (although Kafka has not moved to Tehuti proper, it is essentially the same code they're using, minus a few small fixes missing that we added).

Tehuti is a bit lower level than CodaHale (i.e.: you need to choose exactly which stats you want to measure and the boundaries of your histograms), but this is the type of stuff you would build a wrapper for and then re-use within your code base. For example: the Voldemort RequestCounter class.'
asl2  apache  open-source  tehuti  metrics  percentiles  quantiles  statistics  measurement  latency  kafka  voldemort  linkedin 
october 2014 by jm
mcrouter: A memcached protocol router for scaling memcached deployments
New from Facebook engineering:
Last year, at the Data@Scale event and at the USENIX Networked Systems Design and Implementation conference , we spoke about turning caches into distributed systems using software we developed called mcrouter (pronounced “mick-router”). Mcrouter is a memcached protocol router that is used at Facebook to handle all traffic to, from, and between thousands of cache servers across dozens of clusters distributed in our data centers around the world. It is proven at massive scale — at peak, mcrouter handles close to 5 billion requests per second. Mcrouter was also proven to work as a standalone binary in an Amazon Web Services setup when Instagram used it last year before fully transitioning to Facebook's infrastructure.

Today, we are excited to announce that we are releasing mcrouter’s code under an open-source BSD license. We believe it will help many sites scale more easily by leveraging Facebook’s knowledge about large-scale systems in an easy-to-understand and easy-to-deploy package.


This is pretty crazy -- basically turns a memcached cluster into a much more usable clustered-storage system, with features like shadowing production traffic, cold cache warmup, online reconfiguration, automatic failover, prefix-based routing, replicated pools, etc. Lots of good features.
facebook  scaling  cache  proxy  memcache  open-source  clustering  distcomp  storage 
september 2014 by jm
The Open Source Software Engagement Award
SFU announces award for students who demonstrate excellence in contributing to an Open Source project
sfu  awards  students  open-source  oss  universities  funding 
september 2014 by jm
Open Invention Network Symposium on Open Source Software and Patents in Context
Dublin, 24th September 2014, hosted by Enterprise Ireland. Hosted by former Ubuntu
counsel (via gcarr)
via:gcarr  ubuntu  law  legal  open-source  floss  oss  oin  inventions  patents  swpat  software  ireland  ei  events 
september 2014 by jm
Postman - REST Client
a Chrome extension to aid working with REST APIs. Formats XML and JSON responses, supports file uploads, key/value editors, autocomplete, open source under ASL2
open-source  chrome  extensions  browser  postman  rest  hateoas  api  xml  json  web-services  via:eonnen 
july 2014 by jm
Luigi
A really excellent-looking workflow/orchestration engine for Hadoop, Pig, Hive, Redshift and other ETL jobs, featuring inter-job dependencies, cron-like scheduling, and failure handling. Open source, from Spotify
workflow  orchestration  scheduling  cron  spotify  open-source  luigi  redshift  pig  hive  hadoop  emr  jobs  make  dependencies 
july 2014 by jm
Tessera
Urban Airship with a new open-source Graphite front-end UI; similar enough to Grafana at a glance, no releases yet, ASL2-licensed
graphite  metrics  ui  front-ends  open-source  ops 
july 2014 by jm
Eircode
'Location Codes for Irish Addresses'. Looks like, as expected, this will not have no-cost licensing terms; companies and non-profit orgs will all have to pay Capita Business Support Services Ireland for access. boo.
eircode  mapping  addressing  geocoding  ireland  open-source  licensing  postcodes 
april 2014 by jm
Sirius by Comcast
At Comcast, our applications need convenient, low-latency access to important reference datasets. For example, our XfinityTV websites and apps need to use entertainment-related data to serve almost every API or web request to our datacenters: information like what year Casablanca was released, or how many episodes were in Season 7 of Seinfeld, or when the next episode of the Voice will be airing (and on which channel!).

We traditionally managed this information with a combination of relational databases and RESTful web services but yearned for something simpler than the ORM, HTTP client, and cache management code our developers dealt with on a daily basis. As main memory sizes on commodity servers continued to grow, however, we asked ourselves: How can we keep this reference data entirely in RAM, while ensuring it gets updated as needed and is easily accessible to application developers?

The Sirius distributed system library is our answer to that question, and we're happy to announce that we've made it available as an open source project. Sirius is written in Scala and uses the Akka actor system under the covers, but is easily usable by any JVM-based language.

Also includes a Paxos implementation with "fast follower" read-only slave replication. ASL2-licensed open source.

The only thing I can spot to be worried about is speed of startup; they note that apps need to replay a log at startup to rebuild state, which can be slow if unoptimized in my experience.

Update: in a twitter conversation at https://twitter.com/jon_moore/status/459363751893139456 , Jon Moore indicated they haven't had problems with this even with 'datasets consuming 10-20GB of heap', and have 'benchmarked a 5-node Sirius ingest cluster up to 1k updates/sec write throughput.' That's pretty solid!
open-source  comcast  paxos  replication  read-only  datastores  storage  memory  memcached  redis  sirius  scala  akka  jvm  libraries 
april 2014 by jm
Haywire
kellabyte's hack in progress -- 'an asynchronous HTTP server framework written in C. The goal of Haywire is to learn how to create a server with a minimal feature set that can handle a high rate of requests and connections with as low of latency and resource usage as possible. Haywire uses the event loop based libuv platform layer that node.js is built on top of (also written in C). libuv abstracts IOCP on Windows and epoll/kqueue/event ports/etc. on Unix systems to provide efficient asynchronous I/O on all supported platforms.'

Outperforms libevent handily, it seems. Apache-licensed.
server  http  asynchronous  libuv  haywire  kellabyte  c  events  open-source  asl2 
april 2014 by jm
Consul
Nice-looking new tool from Hashicorp; service discovery and configuration service, built on Raft for leader election, Serf for gossip-based messaging, and Go. Some features:

* Gossip is performed over both TCP and UDP;

* gossip messages are encrypted symmetrically and therefore secure from eavesdropping, tampering, spoofing and packet corruption (like the incident which brought down S3 for days: http://status.aws.amazon.com/s3-20080720.html );

* exposes both a HTTP interface and (even better) DNS;

* includes explicit support for long-distance WAN operation as well as on LANs.

It all looks very practical and usable. MPL-licensed.

The only potential risk I can see is that expecting to receive config updates from a blocking poll of the HTTP interface needs some good "best practice" docs, to ensure that people don't mishandle the scenario where there is a network partition between your calling code and the Consul server/agent. Without any heartbeating protocol behind the scenes, HTTP is vulnerable to "hung connections" which would result in a config change being silently missed by the client until the connection eventually is timed out, either by the calling code or the client-side kernel. This could potentially take minutes to occur, which in some usage scenarios could be a big, unforeseen problem.
configuration  service-discovery  distcomp  raft  consensus-algorithms  go  mpl  open-source  dns  http  gossip-protocol  hashicorp 
april 2014 by jm
s3funnel
'a command line tool for Amazon's Simple Storage Service (S3). Written in Python, easy_install the package to install as an egg. Supports multithreaded operations for large volumes. Put, get, or delete many items concurrently, using a fixed-size pool of threads. Built on workerpool for multithreading and boto for access to the Amazon S3 API. Unix-friendly input and output. Pipe things in, out, and all around.'

MIT-licensed open source. (via Paul Dolan)
via:pdolan  s3  s3funnel  tools  ops  aws  python  mit  open-source 
april 2014 by jm
Dan Kaminsky on Heartbleed
When I said that we expected better of OpenSSL, it’s not merely that there’s some sense that security-driven code should be of higher quality.  (OpenSSL is legendary for being considered a mess, internally.)  It’s that the number of systems that depend on it, and then expose that dependency to the outside world, are considerable.  This is security’s largest contributed dependency, but it’s not necessarily the software ecosystem’s largest dependency.  Many, maybe even more systems depend on web servers like Apache, nginx, and IIS.  We fear vulnerabilities significantly more in libz than libbz2 than libxz, because more servers will decompress untrusted gzip over bzip2 over xz.  Vulnerabilities are not always in obvious places – people underestimate just how exposed things like libxml and libcurl and libjpeg are.  And as HD Moore showed me some time ago, the embedded space is its own universe of pain, with 90’s bugs covering entire countries.

If we accept that a software dependency becomes Critical Infrastructure at some level of economic dependency, the game becomes identifying those dependencies, and delivering direct technical and even financial support.  What are the one million most important lines of code that are reachable by attackers, and least covered by defenders?  (The browsers, for example, are very reachable by attackers but actually defended pretty zealously – FFMPEG public is not FFMPEG in Chrome.)

Note that not all code, even in the same project, is equally exposed.    It’s tempting to say it’s a needle in a haystack.  But I promise you this:  Anybody patches Linux/net/ipv4/tcp_input.c (which handles inbound network for Linux), a hundred alerts are fired and many of them are not to individuals anyone would call friendly.  One guy, one night, patched OpenSSL.  Not enough defenders noticed, and it took Neel Mehta to do something.
development  openssl  heartbleed  ssl  security  dan-kaminsky  infrastructure  libraries  open-source  dependencies 
april 2014 by jm
Beefcake
A sane Google Protocol Buffers library for Ruby. It's all about being Buf; ProtoBuf.
protobuf  google  protocol-buffers  ruby  coding  libraries  gems  open-source 
april 2014 by jm
Huginn
a system for building agents that perform automated tasks for you online. They can read the web, watch for events, and take actions on your behalf. Huginn's Agents create and consume events, propagating them along a directed event flow graph. Think of it as Yahoo! Pipes plus IFTTT on your own server. You always know who has your data. You do.


MIT-licensed open source, built on Rails.
ifttt  automation  huginn  ruby  rails  open-source  agents 
april 2014 by jm
Of Money, Responsibility, and Pride
Steve Marquess of the OpenSSL Foundation on their funding, and lack thereof:
I stand in awe of their talent and dedication, that of Stephen Henson in particular. It takes nerves of steel to work for many years on hundreds of thousands of lines of very complex code, with every line of code you touch visible to the world, knowing that code is used by banks, firewalls, weapons systems, web sites, smart phones, industry, government, everywhere. Knowing that you’ll be ignored and unappreciated until something goes wrong. The combination of the personality to handle that kind of pressure with the relevant technical skills and experience to effectively work on such software is a rare commodity, and those who have it are likely to already be a valued, well-rewarded, and jealously guarded resource of some company or worthy cause. For those reasons OpenSSL will always be undermanned, but the present situation can and should be improved. There should be at least a half dozen full time OpenSSL team members, not just one, able to concentrate on the care and feeding of OpenSSL without having to hustle commercial work. If you’re a corporate or government decision maker in a position to do something about it, give it some thought. Please. I’m getting old and weary and I’d like to retire someday.
funding  open-source  openssl  heartbleed  internet  security  money 
april 2014 by jm
Why no SSL ? — Varnish version 4.0.0 documentation
Poul-Henning Kemp details why Varnish doesn't do SSL -- basically due to the quality and complexity of open-source SSL implementations:
There is no other way we can guarantee that secret krypto-bits do not leak anywhere they should not, than by fencing in the code that deals with them in a child process, so the bulk of varnish never gets anywhere near the certificates, not even during a core-dump.


Now looking pretty smart, post-Heartbleed.
ssl  tls  varnish  open-source  poul-henning-kemp  https  http  proxies  security  coding 
april 2014 by jm
Forbes on the skeleton crew nature of OpenSSL
This is a great point:
Obviously, those tending to the security protocols that support the rest of the Web need better infrastructure and more funding. “Large portions of the software infrastructure of the Internet are built and maintained by volunteers, who get little reward when their code works well but are blamed, and sometimes savagely derided, when it fails,” writes Foster in the New Yorker. [...] "money and support still tend to flow to the newest and sexiest projects, while boring but essential elements like OpenSSL limp along as volunteer efforts,” he writes. “It’s easy to take open-source software for granted, and to forget that the Internet we use every day depends in part on the freely donated work of thousands of programmers.”

We need to find ways to pay for work that is currently essentially donated freely. One promising project is Bithub, from Whisper Systems, where people who make valuable contributions to open source projects are rewarded (with Bitcoin of course). But the pool of Bitcoin is still donation based. The Internet has helped create a culture of free, but what we may need to recognize is that we get what we pay for. Well-funded companies pulling critical code from open source projects for their sites should have formal fee arrangements, rather than the volunteer group simply hoping these users will pony up some Benjamins for “prominent logo placement” on a website most people had never heard of before Heartbleed.
open-source  openssl  free  sponsorship  forbes  via:karl-whelan 
april 2014 by jm
sysdig
open source, system-level exploration: capture system state and activity from a running Linux instance, then save, filter and analyze.
Think of it as strace + tcpdump + lsof + awesome sauce.
With a little Lua cherry on top.


This sounds excellent. Linux-based, GPLv2.
debugging  tools  linux  ops  tracing  strace  open-source  sysdig  cli  tcpdump  lsof 
april 2014 by jm
jmason/IPC-DirQueue
Finally got around to migrating this old CPAN module to github
cpan  github  ipc-dirqueue  perl  open-source  hacks  git  svn 
april 2014 by jm
fauxflake
an easily embeddable, decentralized, k-ordered unique ID generator. It can use the same encoded ID format as Twitter's Snowflake or Boundary's Flake implementations as well as any other customized encoding without too much effort. The fauxflake-core module has no external dependencies and is meant to be about as light as possible while still delivering useful functionality. Essentially, if you want to be able to generate a unique identifier across your infrastructure with reasonable assurances about collisions, then you might find this useful.


From the same guy as the excellent Guava Retrier library; java, ASL2-licensed open source.
open-source  java  asl2  fauxflake  tools  libraries  unique-ids  ids  unique  snowflake  distsys 
april 2014 by jm
[#1259] Add optimized queue for SCMP pattern and use it in NIO and nativ... · 6efac61 · netty/netty
Interesting -- Netty has imported an optimized ASL2-licensed MPSC queue implementation from Akka (presumably for performance raisins)
performance  optimization  open-source  mpsc  queues  data-structures  netty  akka  java 
march 2014 by jm
GPLv2 being tested in US court
The case is still ongoing, so one to watch.
Plaintiff wrote an XML parser and made it available as open source software under the GPLv2. Defendant acquired from another vendor software that included the code, and allegedly distributed that software to parties outside the organization. According to plaintiff, defendant did not comply with the conditions of the GPL, so plaintiff sued for copyright infringement. Defendants moved to dismiss for failure to state a claim. The court denied the motion.
gpl  open-source  licensing  software  law  legal  via:fplogue 
february 2014 by jm
SpamAssassin 3.4.0 released
Good to see the guys cracking on without me ;)

'2014-02-11: SpamAssassin 3.4.0 has been released adding native support for IPv6, improved DNS Blocklist technology and support for massively-scalable Bayesian filtering using the Redis backend.'
antispam  open-source  spamassassin  apache 
february 2014 by jm
Apache Curator
Netflix open-source library to make using ZooKeeper from Java less of a PITA. I really wish I'd used this now, having reimplemented some key parts of it after failures in prod ;)
zookeeper  netflix  apache  curator  java  libraries  open-source 
january 2014 by jm
Extending graphite’s mileage
Ad company InMobi are using graphite heavily (albeit not as heavily as $work are), ran into the usual scaling issues, and chose to fix it in code by switching from a filesystem full of whisper files to a LevelDB per carbon-cache:
The carbon server is now able to run without breaking a sweat even when 500K metrics per minute is being pumped into it. This has been in production since late August 2013 in every datacenter that we operate from.


Very nice. I hope this gets merged/supported.
graphite  scalability  metrics  leveldb  storage  inmobi  whisper  carbon  open-source 
january 2014 by jm
Register article on Amazon's attitude to open source
This article is frequently on target; this secrecy (both around open source and publishing papers) was one of the reasons I left Amazon.
Of the sources with whom we spoke, many indicated that Amazon's lack of participation was a key reason for why people left the company – or never joined at all. This is why Amazon's strategy of maintaining secrecy may derail the e-retailer's future if it struggles to hire the best talent. [...]

"In many cases in the big companies and all the small startups, your Github profile is your resume," explained another former Amazonian. "When I look at developers that's what I'm looking for, [but] they go to Amazon and that resume stops ... It absolutely affects the quality of their hires." "You had no portfolio you could share with the world," said another insider on life after working at Amazon. "The argument this was necessary to attract talent and to retain talent completely fell on deaf ears."
amazon  recruitment  secrecy  open-source  hiring  work  research  conferences 
january 2014 by jm
ISPAI responds to TD Patrick O'Donovan's bizarre comments regarding "open source browsers"
ISPAI is rather dismayed and somewhat confused by the recent press release issued by Deputy Patrick O’Donovan (FG). He appears to be asking the Oireachtas Communications Committee (of which he is a member) to investigate: “the matter of tougher controls on the use of open source internet browsers and payment systems”  which he claims “allow users to remain anonymous for illegal trade of drugs weapons and pornography.”

Deputy O’Donovan would do well to ask the advice of industry experts on these matters given that legislating to curtail the use of such legitimate software or services, which may be misused by some, is neither practical nor logical. Whether or not a browser is open source bears no relevance to its ability to be the subject of anonymous use. Indeed, Deputy O’Donovan must surely be confusing and conflating different technical concepts? In tracing illegal activities, Law Enforcement Agencies and co-operating parties will use IP addresses – users’ choice of browser has little relevance to an investigation of criminal activity.

Equally, it may be that the Deputy is uncomfortable with the concept of electronic payment systems but these underpin the digital economy which is bringing enormous benefit to Ireland. Yes, these may be misused by criminals but so are cash and traditional banking services. Restricting the growth of innovative financial services is not the solution to tackling cyber criminals who might be operating what he describes as “online supermarkets for illegal goods.”

Tackling international cybercrime requires more specialist Law Enforcement resources at national level and improved international police cooperation supported by revision of EU legislation relating to obtaining server log evidence existing in other jurisdictions.
ispai  open-source  patrick-o-donovan  fine-gael  press-releases  tor  darknet  crime 
january 2014 by jm
Irish politician calls for ban on "open source browsers"
'Fine Gael TD for Limerick, Patrick O'Donovan has called for tougher controls on the use of open source internet browsers and payment systems which allow users to remain anonymous in the illegal trade of drugs, weapons and pornography.'

Amazing. Yes, this is real.
open-source  clueless  omgwtfbbq  fine-gael  ireland  fail  funny  tor  inept 
january 2014 by jm
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