jm + newspapers   12

How the Guardian found 800,000 paying readers
The strategy to rescue the Guardian from financial oblivion has attained a landmark position by increasing its revenue from readers to a point where it now outweighs the paper’s income from advertising.
This significant shift in the Guardian’s business model, making it less dependent on a highly challenging advertising market for media companies, results largely from a quadrupling in the number of readers making monthly payments under the title’s membership scheme, which has grown from 75,000 to 300,000 members in the past year.


Wow. Good job Guardian!
guardian  journalism  subscriptions  newspapers  future  membership  donations 
18 days ago by jm
IrishCycle.com on the Irish Times' terrible victim-blaming anti-cycling op-ed
Even if The Irish Times wants to deny that it has engaged in victim blaming at a high level, it has also clearly errored in fact in a very significant way. It would be more forgiving if this was an isolated editorial. But it’s after two days of wrong or misleading coverage, which now seems to be a trend with the newspaper with unbalanced articles or headlines negatively focusing on cycle routes.
irish-times  newspapers  op-eds  cycling  dublin  ireland  safety 
august 2015 by jm
Spain pushes for 'Google tax' to restrict linking
The government wants to put a tax on linking on the internet. They say that if you want to link to some newspaper's content, you have to pay a tax. The primary targets of this law are Google News and other aggregators. It would be absurd enough just like that, but the law goes further: they declared it an "inalienable right" so even if I have a blog or a new small digital media publication and I want to let people freely link to my content, I can't opt-out--they are charging the levy, and giving it to the big press media.

It was just the last and only way that the old traditional media companies can get some money from the government, and they strongly lobbied for it. The bill has passed in the Congress where the party in the government has majority (PP, Partido Popular) and it's headed to the Senate, where they have a majority also.
spain  stupidity  law  via:boingboing  linking  links  web  news  google  google-news  newspapers  old-media  taxes 
july 2014 by jm
Irish NewsDiffs
Tracking Irish News Stories Over Time;
Irish NewsDiffs archives changes in articles after publication.
Currently, we track rte.ie and irishtimes.com.
rte  irish-times  diffing  diffs  changes  tracking  newspapers  news  ireland  history 
april 2014 by jm
Opinion: How can we get over ‘Pantigate’?
The fact that RTÉ had agreed to pay damages (€80,000 in total, according to reports yesterday) to the ‘injured parties’, only came to light in an email from the [far-right Catholic lobby group Iona Institute] to its members last Tuesday.
Given the ramifications of the decision to make any kind of payment – regardless of the amount – both for the TV licence payer and those who voice contrarian opinions, the lack of coverage in print media as soon as the Iona email came to light marked a low point for print journalism in Ireland. Aside from a lead story on the damages printed in this paper last Wednesday and ongoing debate online, the media has been glacially slow with commentary and even reportage of the affair.
The debacle has untold ramifications for public life in this country. That many liberal commentators may now baulk at the opportunity to speak and write openly and honestly about homophobia is the most obvious issue here. Most worrying of all, however, is the question that with a referendum on the introduction of gay marriage on the horizon, how can we expect the national broadcaster to facilitate even-handed debate on the subject when they’ve already found themselves cowed before reaching the first hurdle?
homophobia  politics  ireland  libel  dissent  lobbying  defamation  law  gay-marriage  iona-institute  journalism  newspapers 
february 2014 by jm
My email to Irish Times Editor, sent 25th June
Daragh O'Brien noting 3 stories on 3 consecutive days voicing dangerously skewed misinformation about data protection and privacy law in Ireland:
There is a worrying pattern in these stories. The first two decry the Data Protection legislation (current and future) as being dangerous to children and damaging to the genealogy trade. The third sets up an industry “self-regulation” straw man and heralds it as progress (when it is decidedly not, serving only to further confuse consumers about their rights).

If I was a cynical person I would find it hard not to draw the conclusion that the Irish Times, the “paper of record” has been stooged by organisations who are resistant to the defence of and validation of fundamental rights to privacy as enshrined in the Data Protection Acts and EU Treaties, and in the embryonic Data Protection Regulation. That these stories emerge hot on the heels of the pendulum swing towards privacy concerns that the NSA/Prism revelations have triggered is, I must assume, a co-incidence. It cannot be the case that the Irish Times blindly publishes press releases without conducting cursory fact checking on the stories contained therein?

Three stories over three days is insufficient data to plot a definitive trend, but the emphasis is disconcerting. Is it the Irish Times’ editorial position that Data Protection legislation and the protection of fundamental rights is a bad thing and that industry self-regulation that operates in ignorance of legislation is the appropriate model for the future? It surely cannot be that press releases are regurgitated as balanced fact and news by the Irish Times without fact checking and verification? If I was to predict a “Data Protection killed my Puppy” type headline for tomorrow’s edition or another later this week would I be proved correct?
daragh-obrien  irish-times  iab  bias  advertising  newspapers  press-releases  journalism  data-protection  privacy  ireland 
june 2013 by jm
The Why
How the Irish media are partly to blame for the catastrophic property bubble, from a paper entitled _The Role Of The Media In Propping Up Ireland’s Housing Bubble_, by Dr Julien Mercille, in the _Social Europe Journal_:
“The overall argument is that the Irish media are part and parcel of the political and corporate establishment, and as such the news they convey tend to reflect those sectors’ interests and views. In particular, the Celtic Tiger years involved the financialisation of the economy and a large property bubble, all of it wrapped in an implicit neoliberal ideology. The media, embedded within this particular political economy and itself a constitutive element of it, thus mostly presented stories sustaining it. In particular, news organisations acquired direct stakes in an inflated real estate market by purchasing property websites and receiving vital advertising revenue from the real estate sector. Moreover, a number of their board members were current or former high officials in the finance industry and government, including banks deeply involved in the bubble’s expansion."
economics  irish-times  ireland  newspapers  media  elite  insiders  bubble  property-bubble  property  celtic-tiger  papers  news  bias 
april 2013 by jm
Piracy: are we being conned?
The Age with a cynical take on pro-music-biz anti-piracy "reports". "The quality of data and analysis is very weak as its political objective is so clear. It does not use actual ABS data but data taken from Europe. It's an elemental statistical error, it's fudging with numbers to come out with a figure which is 'kinda sorta' plausible."
piracy  filesharing  copyright  australia  the-age  newspapers  ifpi  acta 
june 2011 by jm
irishindoleaks
'leaking the indo's offline wikileaks coverage online where it belongs' - scans of each article
irish-independent  ireland  politics  wikileaks  newspapers  scans 
june 2011 by jm
No Sleep 'Til Brooklands: A True Story Of Daily Mail Lies (guest post)
how the Daily Mail (UK) works, via b3ta. mind-boggling misuse of one woman's comments to concoct a story, according to this
daily-mail  journalism  libel  media  newspapers  law  uk  via:b3ta  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
Today's Guardian
Phil Gyford reworks the Grauniad's website using their open content API. I really like the navigation and just-the-text nature, but I still feel a need to know what other articles are "nearby", which this doesn't quite provide. Still, excellent work
phil-gyford  news  newspapers  gu  guardian  design  usability  reading  readability  webdesign  from delicious
june 2010 by jm

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