jm + neuroscience   6

Dormio: Interfacing with Dreams to Augment Human Creativity — MIT Media Lab
Using Dormio you fall asleep as you normally would, but the transition into stage 2 sleep is tracked and interrupted. This suspends you in a semi-lucid state where microdreams are inceptable, allowing direction of your dreams. 
dreaming  dreams  science  neuroscience  brain  sleep  lucid-dreaming  via:fp  dormio 
july 2018 by jm
_Could a Neuroscientist Understand a Microprocessor?_
'There is a popular belief in neuroscience that we are primarily data limited, that producing large, multimodal, and complex datasets will, enabled by data analysis algorithms, lead to fundamental insights into the way the brain processes information. Microprocessors are among those artificial information processing systems that are both complex and that we understand at all levels, from the overall logical flow, via logical gates, to the dynamics of transistors. Here we take a simulated classical microprocessor as a model organism, and use our ability to perform arbitrary experiments on it to see if popular data analysis methods from neuroscience can elucidate the way it processes information. We show that the approaches reveal interesting structure in the data but do not meaningfully describe the hierarchy of information processing in the processor. This suggests that current approaches in neuroscience may fall short of producing meaningful models of the brain.'

via Bryan O'Sullivan.
via:bos  neuroscience  microprocessors  6502  computers  hardware  wetware  brain  biology  neural-systems 
june 2016 by jm
The Neurocritic: Fisher-Price Synesthesia
'Synesthesia [jm: sic] is a rare perceptual phenomenon in which the stimulation of one sensory modality, or exposure to one type of stimulus, leads to a sensory (or cognitive) experience in a different, non-stimulated modality. For instance, some synesthetes have colored hearing while others might taste shapes. GRAPHEME-COLOR SYNESTHESIA is the condition in which individual printed letters are perceived in a specific, constant color. This occurs involuntarily and in the absence of colored font. [...] A new study has identified 11 synesthetes whose grapheme-color mappings appear to be based on the Fisher Price plastic letter set made between 1972-1990.'

(via Dave Green)
fisher-price  synesthesia  synaesthesia  colors  colours  sight  neuroscience  brain  via-dave-green  toys 
january 2013 by jm
Inside the mind of the octopus
"Researchers who study octopuses are convinced that these boneless, alien animals—creatures whose ancestors diverged from the lineage that would lead to ours roughly 500 to 700 million years ago—have developed intelligence, emotions, and individual personalities. Their findings are challenging our understanding of consciousness itself."
octopus  animals  biology  consciousness  neuroscience  science 
november 2011 by jm
How Little Sleep Can You Get Away With?
'after just a few days, the four- and six-hour group reported that, yes, they were slightly sleepy. But they insisted they had adjusted to their new state. Even 14 days into the study, they said sleepiness was not affecting them. In fact, their performance had tanked. In other words, the sleep-deprived among us are lousy judges of our own sleep needs. We are not nearly as sharp as we think we are.'
sleep  rest  brain  science  neuroscience 
april 2011 by jm

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