jm + mri   3

MRI software bugs could upend years of research - The Register
In their paper at PNAS, they write: “the most common software packages for fMRI analysis (SPM, FSL, AFNI) can result in false-positive rates of up to 70%. These results question the validity of some 40,000 fMRI studies and may have a large impact on the interpretation of neuroimaging results.”

For example, a bug that's been sitting in a package called 3dClustSim for 15 years, fixed in May 2015, produced bad results (3dClustSim is part of the AFNI suite; the others are SPM and FSL). That's not a gentle nudge that some results might be overstated: it's more like making a bonfire of thousands of scientific papers.

Further: “Our results suggest that the principal cause of the invalid cluster inferences is spatial autocorrelation functions that do not follow the assumed Gaussian shape”.

The researchers used published fMRI results, and along the way they swipe the fMRI community for their “lamentable archiving and data-sharing practices” that prevent most of the discipline's body of work being re-analysed. ®
fmri  science  mri  statistics  cluster-inference  autocorrelation  data  papers  medicine  false-positives  fps  neuroimaging 
july 2016 by jm
Getting good cancer care through 3D printing
This is pretty incredible.
Balzer downloaded a free software program called InVesalius, developed by a research center in Brazil to convert MRI and CT scan data to 3D images. He used it to create a 3D volume rendering from Scott’s DICOM images, which allowed him to look at the tumor from any angle. Then he uploaded the files to Sketchfab and shared them with neurosurgeons around the country in the hope of finding one who was willing to try a new type of procedure. Perhaps unsurprisingly, he found the doctor he was looking for at UPMC, where Scott had her thyroid removed. A neurosurgeon there agreed to consider a minimally invasive operation in which he would access the tumor through Scott’s left eyelid and remove it using a micro drill. Balzer had adapted the volume renderings for 3D printing and produced a few full-size models of the front section of Scott’s skull on his MakerBot. To help the surgeon vet his micro drilling idea and plan the procedure, Balzer packed up one of the models and shipped it off to Pittsburgh.
diy  surgery  health  cancer  tumours  medicine  3d-printing  3d  scanning  mri  dicom 
january 2015 by jm
Flickr: gruntzooki's stuff tagged with femur
Cory Doctorow got an MRI of his femur in prep for a surgical procedure -- and his wife used it to make a 3D-printed titanium keyring! awesome. I want to do this with MY SKULL
3d-printing  gadgets  cool  keyrings  tchotchkes  nifty  toys  gifts  mri  medical  bones  from delicious
march 2011 by jm

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