jm + minecraft   16

The Mirai Botnet Was Part of a College Student Minecraft Scheme
The truth, as made clear in that Alaskan courtroom Friday — and unsealed by the Justice Department on Wednesday—was even stranger: The brains behind Mirai were a 21-year-old Rutgers college student from suburban New Jersey and his two college-age friends from outside Pittsburgh and New Orleans. All three—Paras Jha, Josiah White, and Dalton Norman, respectively—admitted their role in creating and launching Mirai into the world.

Originally, prosecutors say, the defendants hadn’t intended to bring down the internet—they had been trying to gain an advantage in the computer game Minecraft. “They didn’t realize the power they were unleashing,” says FBI supervisory special agent Bill Walton. "This was the Manhattan Project."


(via Nelson)
minecraft  botnets  mirai  security  rutgers  ddos 
december 2017 by jm
Cover Story: “Playdate” - The New Yorker
the story behind Chris Ware's lovely Minecraft New Yorker cover
minecraft  chris-ware  art  kids  play  gaming  games 
june 2015 by jm
Dong detection in LEGO Universe
great example of how Minecraft solved the problem the easy way -- by simply not making an MMO, the whole problem effectively goes away
penis  funny  games  lego  lego-universe  minecraft  gaming  mmo  ugc 
june 2015 by jm
Writing Minecraft Plugins - The Book
wow, Walter Higgins' book (from Peachpit Press) is looking great
books  reading  minecraft  walter-higgins  javascript 
april 2015 by jm
One Hundred Miles of Solitude
Via Walter, the best description of the appeal of Minecraft I've read:
Minecraft is exceptionally good at intrinsic narrative. It recognises, preserves and rewards everything you do. It presses you to play frontiersman. A Minecraft world ends up dotted with torchlit paths, menhirs, landmarks, emergency caches. Here’s the hole where you dug stone for your first house. Here’s the causeway you built from your spawn point to a handy woodland. Here’s the crater in the landscape where the exploding monster took out you and your wheatfield at once. And, of course, here’s your enormous castle above a waterfall. There’s no utility in building anything bigger than a hut, but the temptations of architecture are irresistible. Minecraft isn’t so much a world generator as a screenshot-generator and a war-story generator.

This is what will get the game the bulk of its critical attention, and deservedly so. That’s why I want to call attention to the extrinsic narrative. It’s minimal, implicit,  accidental and very powerful. It’s this: you wake alone beside an endless sea in a pristine, infinite wilderness. The world is yours. You can literally sculpt mountains, with time and effort. You’ll die and be reborn on the beach where you woke first. You’ll walk across the world forever and never see another face. You can build a whole empire of roads and palaces and beacon towers, and the population of that empire will only ever be you. When you leave, your towers will stand empty forever. I haven’t seen that surfaced in a game before. It’s strong wine.
minecraft  narrative  gaming  games  story 
february 2015 by jm
rjbs's rubric: In Soviet Minecraft, server op you!
wow, that is too much effort for a 7-year-old's Minecraft server ;) Very impressive
minecraft  game-servers  kids  teleport  gaming  rjbs  perl 
november 2014 by jm
How Videogames Like Minecraft Actually Help Kids Learn to Read | WIRED

I analyzed several chunks of The Ultimate Player's Guide using the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease scale, and they scored from grade 8 to grade 11. Yet in my neighborhood they're being devoured by kids in the early phases of elementary school. Games, it seems, can motivate kids to read—and to read way above their level. This is what Constance Steinkuehler, a games researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, discovered. She asked middle and high school students who were struggling readers (one 11th-grade student read at a 6th-grade level) to choose a game topic they were interested in, and then she picked texts from game sites for them to read—some as difficult as first-year-college language. The kids devoured them with no help and nearly perfect accuracy.

How could they do this? “Because they're really, really motivated,” Steinkuehler tells me. It wasn't just that the students knew the domain well; there were plenty of unfamiliar words. But they persisted more because they cared about the task. “It's situated knowledge. They see a piece of language, a turn of phrase, and they figure it out.”


When my kids are playing Minecraft, there's a constant stream of "how do you spell X?" as they craft nametags for their pets. It's great!
minecraft  gaming  kids  education  spelling  school  reading  literacy 
october 2014 by jm
Platform Game
I'm ambivalent about Microsoft acquiring Mojang. Will they Embrace and Extend Minecraft as they've done with other categories? Let's hope not. On the other hand, some adult supervision and a Plugin API would be welcome. Mojang have the financial resources but lack the will and focus needed to publish and support a Plugin API. Perhaps Mojang themselves don't realise just how important their little game has become.
minecraft  platforms  games  plugins  mojang  microsoft 
september 2014 by jm
The Edge Minecraft cover
This is brilliant. Half of the office now wants prints.

Massive congratulations to Edge magazine. The stellar publication has been around for 20 years! To celebrate, their 258th issue comes in 20 different flavours, and one of those flavours includes the earthly overtones of both Minecraft and Dungeons & Dragons. Junkboy drew it, and I [Owen] worded it a few weeks ago.
covers  images  edge  minecraft  gaming  funny  dungeons-and-dragons  retro  dnd 
august 2013 by jm
Does it run Minecraft? Well, since you ask…
Going by the number of Minecraft fans among my friends' sons and daughters in the 8-12 age group, this is a great idea:
We sent a bunch of [Raspberry Pi] boards out to Notch and the guys at Mojang in Stockholm a little while back, and they’ve produced a port of Minecraft: Pocket Edition which they’re calling  Minecraft: Pi Edition. It’ll carry a revised feature set and support for several programming languages, so you can code direct into Minecraft before you start playing. (Or you can just – you know – play.)
minecraft  gaming  programming  coding  raspberry-pi  kids  learning  education 
november 2012 by jm
On Patents
Notch comes up with a perfect analogy for software patents.
I am mostly fine with the concept of “selling stuff you made”, so I’m also against copyright infringement. I don’t think it’s quite as bad as theft, and I’m not sure it’s good for society that some professions can get paid over and over long after they did the work (say, in the case of a game developer), whereas others need to perform the job over and over to get paid (say, in the case of a hairdresser or a lawyer). But yeah, “selling stuff you made” is good. But there is no way in hell you can convince me that it’s beneficial for society to not share ideas. Ideas are free. They improve on old things, make them better, and this results in all of society being better. Sharing ideas is how we improve. A common argument for patents is that inventors won’t invent unless they can protect their ideas. The problem with this argument is that patents apply even if the infringer came up with the idea independently. If the idea is that easy to think of, why do we need to reward the person who happened to be first?

Of course, in reality it's even worse, since you don't actually have to be first to invent -- just first to file without sufficient people noticing, and people are actively dissuaded from noticing (since it makes their lives riskier if they know about the existence of patents)...
business  legal  ip  copyright  patents  notch  minecraft  patent-trolls 
july 2012 by jm
Notch on piracy: “if a pirated game is a lost sale, should bad reviews be illegal?” | PC Gamer
wish more "piracy = theft" people would think about this viewpoint. mind you, fwiw, I buy my games, and have paid for Minecraft ;)
piracy  gaming  games  minecraft  notch  from delicious
march 2011 by jm
Gamasutra - News - Opinion: Minecraft And The Question Of Luck
'Notch’s luck was that he came across the idea of doing a first-person fortress building game. His alignment was that the game that he wanted to make was culturally connected to [he PC gamer] tribe. While the game may appear ugly, and its purchase process etc seem naive to many a gaming professional, all of those decisions that Notch made along the road to releasing his game were from the point of view of a particular perspective of what games are, what matters and what were the things that he could trust the tribe to figure out for themselves.'
tribes  viral  minecraft  gaming  analysis  games  culture  gamasutra  via:nelson  future  software  marketing  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
Minecraft Subreddit
this is not going to help my addiction
minecraft  community  games  reddit  from delicious
october 2010 by jm
MineCraft: Mine The Gap, Day 1
Rock, Paper, Shotgun review the current lo-fi sandbox indie-game hit
pixels  minecraft  gaming  fun  walkthroughs  from delicious
september 2010 by jm

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