jm + milk   4

On the association between adolescent well-being and digital technology use
Lies, damn lies, and statistics. 'if we believe screens are destroying a generation [of kids] that would mean that so are potatoes, having asthma, not drinking milk, going to movies, music, religion, being tall, biking, and wearing glasses' [...]

'The take home from this new study is the evidence that smart phones are destroying a generation is not any stronger than potatoes and eyeglasses are destroying a generation. The moral panic surrounding the fear of screens is simply not supported by good science.'
potatoes  funny  glasses  asthma  milk  movies  music  religion  cycling  screens  screentime  kids  teenagers  wellbeing  mental-health 
4 weeks ago by jm
I Accidentally Made Myself Lactose Intolerant With Whole30
A few years back, I had a nasty bout of food poisoning while travelling, which made me lactose-intolerant for several years. Sounds like this may be more common than you'd think, based on this article:
If you haven’t heard of Whole30, some information: It’s a month-long eating plan that aims to help followers hit “the reset button with your health, habits, and relationship with food.” For 30 days, you cut out soy, legumes, grains, sugars, alcohol, and, of course, dairy. [....]

When you reach the end of the Whole30, you’re supposed to add the forbidden food groups back into your diet one at a time. The goal is to figure out which foods are making you feel sluggish, bloated, or just generally not great, so you can ostensibly keep on avoiding them forever.

I didn’t do that part. I just jumped right back into eating what I wanted — but suddenly nothing was the same. That first bowl of ice cream I’d been looking forward to for weeks was quickly followed by sharp stomach pains and what can best be described (grossly, but accurately) as bubble gut. [....]

The good news, according to gastrointestinal specialist Kim Barrett, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego, is that I’m not crazy. The bad news is that dairy no longer agrees with my body’s biology. Turns out, it is possible to suddenly make yourself lactose intolerant.

“To some extent, our ability to handle lactose is a use-it-or-lose-it phenomenon,” Barrett says. The body digests lactose — a disaccharide — by using lactase, an enzyme in the small intestine, to break it down into the monosaccharides glucose and galactose, which can then be absorbed. “If you don’t have the [lactose] substrate in the diet, you start to reduce the synthesis of the lactase enzyme to digest it,” Barrett explains. “After a period of completely excluding lactose from the diet, you may not have any of those digestive enzymes present.”
diet  food  lactose  lactase  intolerance  whole30  milk  cheese 
6 weeks ago by jm
What the Irish Ate Before Potatoes - Bon Appétit
on the history of Irish cuisine -- mostly milk and butter, and notably "bog butter":
And the Irish didn’t like their butter just one way: from the 12th century on, there are records of butter flavored with onion and garlic, and local traditions of burying butter in bogs. Originally, it’s thought that bog butter began as a good storage system, but after a time, buried bog butter came to be valued for its uniquely boggy flavor.
bog-butter  bogs  ireland  food  eating  milk  curds  whey  banbidh  dairy 
june 2016 by jm
Make Your Own 3-D Printer Filament From Old Milk Jugs
Creating your own 3-D printer filament from old used milk jugs is exponentially cheaper, and uses considerably less energy, than buying new filament, according to new research from Michigan Technological University. [...] The savings are really quite impressive — 99 cents on the dollar, in addition to the reduced use of energy. Interestingly (but again not surprisingly), the amount of energy used to ‘recycle’ the old milk jugs yourself is considerably less than that used in recycling such jugs conventionally.
recycling  3d-printers  printing  tech  plastic  milk 
march 2014 by jm

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