jm + merging   6

Git team workflows: merge or rebase?
Well-written description of the pros and cons. I'm a rebaser, fwiw.

(via Darrell)
via:darrell  git  merging  rebasing  history  git-log  coding  workflow  dev  teams  collaboration  github 
june 2015 by jm
Faster BAM Sorting with SAMtools and RocksDB
Now this is really really clever. Heap-merging a heavyweight genomics format, using RocksDB to speed it up.
There’s a problem with the single-pass merge described above when the number of intermediate files, N/R, is large. Merging the sorted intermediate files in limited memory requires constantly reading little bits from all those files, incurring a lot of disk seeks on rotating drives. In fact, at some point, samtools sort performance becomes effectively bound to disk seeking. [...] In this scenario, samtools rocksort can sort the same data in much less time, using no more memory, by invoking RocksDB’s background compaction capabilities. With a few extra lines of code we configure RocksDB so that, while we’re still in the process of loading the BAM data, it runs additional background threads to merge batches of existing sorted temporary files into fewer, larger, sorted files. Just like the final merge, each background compaction requires only a modest amount of working memory.


(via the RocksDB facebook group)
rocksdb  algorithms  sorting  leveldb  bam  samtools  merging  heaps  compaction 
may 2014 by jm
Streaming MapReduce with Summingbird
Before Summingbird at Twitter, users that wanted to write production streaming aggregations would typically write their logic using a Hadoop DSL like Pig or Scalding. These tools offered nice distributed system abstractions: Pig resembled familiar SQL, while Scalding, like Summingbird, mimics the Scala collections API. By running these jobs on some regular schedule (typically hourly or daily), users could build time series dashboards with very reliable error bounds at the unfortunate cost of high latency.

While using Hadoop for these types of loads is effective, Twitter is about real-time and we needed a general system to deliver data in seconds, not hours. Twitter’s release of Storm made it easy to process data with very low latencies by sacrificing Hadoop’s fault tolerant guarantees. However, we soon realized that running a fully real-time system on Storm was quite difficult for two main reasons:

Recomputation over months of historical logs must be coordinated with Hadoop or streamed through Storm with a custom log loading mechanism;
Storm is focused on message passing and random-write databases are harder to maintain.

The types of aggregations one can perform in Storm are very similar to what’s possible in Hadoop, but the system issues are very different. Summingbird began as an investigation into a hybrid system that could run a streaming aggregation in both Hadoop and Storm, as well as merge automatically without special consideration of the job author. The hybrid model allows most data to be processed by Hadoop and served out of a read-only store. Only data that Hadoop hasn’t yet been able to process (data that falls within the latency window) would be served out of a datastore populated in real-time by Storm. But the error of the real-time layer is bounded, as Hadoop will eventually get around to processing the same data and will smooth out any error introduced. This hybrid model is appealing because you get well understood, transactional behavior from Hadoop, and up to the second additions from Storm. Despite the appeal, the hybrid approach has the following practical problems:

Two sets of aggregation logic have to be kept in sync in two different systems;
Keys and values must be serialized consistently between each system and the client.

The client is responsible for reading from both datastores, performing a final aggregation and serving the combined results
Summingbird was developed to provide a general solution to these problems.


Very interesting stuff. I'm particularly interested in the design constraints they've chosen to impose to achieve this -- data formats which require associative merging in particular.
mapreduce  streaming  big-data  twitter  storm  summingbird  scala  pig  hadoop  aggregation  merging 
september 2013 by jm
Using DiffMerge as your Git visual merge and diff tool
A decent 3-way-diff GUI merge tool which works with git on OSX. "git config" command-lines included in this blog post
git  merge  osx  mac  macosx  diff  mergetool  merging  cli  diffmerge 
march 2013 by jm

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