jm + meat   9

Yes, bacon really is killing us - The Guardian Long Read
Since we eat with our eyes, the main way we judge the quality of cured meats is pinkness. Yet it is this very colour that we should be suspicious of, as the French journalist Guillaume Coudray explains in a book published in France last year called Cochonneries, a word that means both “piggeries” and “rubbish” or “junk food”. The subtitle is “How Charcuterie Became a Poison”. Cochonneries reads like a crime novel, in which the processed meat industry is the perpetrator and ordinary consumers are the victims.

The pinkness of bacon – or cooked ham, or salami – is a sign that it has been treated with chemicals, more specifically with nitrates and nitrites. It is the use of these chemicals that is widely believed to be the reason why “processed meat” is much more carcinogenic than unprocessed meat. Coudray argues that we should speak not of “processed meat” but “nitro-meat”.

[...] When nitrates interact with certain components in red meat (haem iron, amines and amides), they form N-nitroso compounds, which cause cancer. The best known of these compounds is nitrosamine. This, as Guillaume Coudray explained to me in an email, is known to be “carcinogenic even at a very low dose”. Any time someone eats bacon, ham or other processed meat, their gut receives a dose of nitrosamines, which damage the cells in the lining of the bowel, and can lead to cancer.

You would not know it from the way bacon is sold, but scientists have known nitrosamines are carcinogenic for a very long time. More than 60 years ago, in 1956, two British researchers called Peter Magee and John Barnes found that when rats were fed dimethyl nitrosamine, they developed malignant liver tumours. By the 1970s, animal studies showed that small, repeated doses of nitrosamines and nitrosamides – exactly the kind of regular dose a person might have when eating a daily breakfast of bacon – were found to cause tumours in many organs including the liver, stomach, oesophagus, intestines, bladder, brain, lungs and kidneys.

But there IS some good news for Parma ham and sausages:

In 1993, Parma ham producers in Italy made a collective decision to remove nitrates from their products and revert to using only salt, as in the old days. For the past 25 years, no nitrates or nitrites have been used in any Prosciutto di Parma. Even without nitrate or nitrite, the Parma ham stays a deep rosy-pink colour. We now know that the colour in Parma ham is totally harmless, a result of the enzyme reactions during the ham’s 18-month ageing process.

[...] the average British sausage – as opposed to a hard sausage like a French saucisson – is not cured, being made of nothing but fresh meat, breadcrumbs, herbs, salt and E223, a preservative that is non-carcinogenic. After much questioning, two expert spokespeople for the US National Cancer Institute confirmed to me that “one might consider” fresh sausages to be “red meat” and not processed meat, and thus only a “probable” carcinogen.
bacon  sausages  meat  parma-ham  ham  food  cancer  carcinogens  big-meat  nitrates  nitrites 
17 days ago by jm
'Can People Distinguish Pâté from Dog Food?'

Considering the similarity of its ingredients, canned dog food could be a suitable and
inexpensive substitute for pâté or processed blended meat products such as Spam or
liverwurst. However, the social stigma associated with the human consumption of pet
food makes an unbiased comparison challenging. To prevent bias, Newman's Own dog
food was prepared with a food processor to have the texture and appearance of a liver
mousse. In a double-blind test, subjects were presented with five unlabeled blended meat
products, one of which was the prepared dog food. After ranking the samples on the basis
of taste, subjects were challenged to identify which of the five was dog food. Although
72% of subjects ranked the dog food as the worst of the five samples in terms of taste
(Newell and MacFarlane multiple comparison, P<0.05), subjects were not better than
random at correctly identifying the dog food.
pate  food  omgwtf  science  research  dog-food  meat  economics  taste  flavour 
may 2015 by jm
Men Angrily Eating Raw Steak
the stock-photo counterpart to "Women Eating Salad" has been found
stock-photos  photos  meat  steak  funny  men  salad 
march 2015 by jm
A tick bite can make you allergic to red meat
The bugs harbor a sugar that humans don't have, called alpha-gal. The sugar is also is found in red meat — beef, pork, venison, rabbit — and even some dairy products. It's usually fine when people encounter it through food that gets digested.
But a tick bite triggers an immune system response, and in that high-alert state, the body perceives the sugar the tick transmitted to the victim's bloodstream and skin as a foreign substance, and makes antibodies to it. That sets the stage for an allergic reaction the next time the person eats red meat and encounters the sugar.

Via Shane Naughton
ticks  meat  food  allergies  immune-system  health  via:inundata  sugar  alpha-gal  red-meat 
august 2014 by jm
'EAT CELEBRITY MEAT! BiteLabs grows meat from celebrity tissue samples and uses it to make artisanal salami.'

Genius. (via John Looney)
via:john-looney  meat  startups  food  funny  salami  tissue-samples  celebrity  jennifer-lawrence 
february 2014 by jm
Tacos al Pastor
yummy-looking recipe from Lily at
tacos  mexican-food  food  recipes  meat  tacos-al-pastor 
january 2014 by jm
Where your "full Irish" really comes from
This is really disappointing; many meats labelled as "Irish" are anything but. The only trustworthy mark is the Bord Bia "Origin Ireland" stamp -- I'll be avoiding any products without this in future.
Under European labelling law, country of origin is mandatory for beef, fish, olive oil, honey and fresh fruit and vegetables. Next month the EU will make it law to specify country of origin for the meat of pigs, chicken, sheep and goats, with a lead-in time of anywhere up to three years for food companies to comply.
The pork rule, however, will only apply to fresh pork and not to processed meat, so consumers still won’t get a country-of-origin label on rashers, sausages or ham. In the meantime, the Bord Bia Origin-Ireland stamp is a guarantee that your Irish breakfast ingredients are indeed Irish.
bord-bia  labelling  eu  country-of-origin  meat  pork  food  quality 
november 2013 by jm
'Become a virtual beef farmer. Control your personal food chain.' also deliver prime beef. mmmm
meat  beef  mullingar  heifers  cows  food  eating  shopping  ireland  from delicious
october 2009 by jm
The Best Way to Cook a Thick Steak
30 minutes over medium heat, cooked in its own fat. whoa, I want to try this
food  delicious  cooking  eating  meat  recipe  steak  beef  howto  recipes  from delicious
october 2009 by jm

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