jm + magic   3

In first, 3-D printed objects connect to WiFi without electronics
This. is. magic.

Physical motion—pushing a button, laundry soap flowing out of a bottle, turning a knob, removing a hammer from a weighted tool bench—triggers gears and springs elsewhere in the 3-D printed object that cause a conductive switch to intermittently connect or disconnect with the antenna and change its reflective state. Information—in the form of 1s and 0s—is encoded by the presence or absence of the tooth on a gear. Energy from a coiled spring drives the gear system, and the width and pattern of gear teeth control how long the backscatter switch makes contact with the antenna, creating patterns of reflected signals that can be decoded by a WiFi receiver.
magic  wifi  whoa  3d-printing  objects  plastic  gears  springs 
4 days ago by jm
Microsoft Code Digger extension
Miguel de Icaza says it's witchcraft -- I'm inclined to agree:

Code Digger analyzes possible execution paths through your .NET code. The result is a table where each row shows a unique behavior of your code. The table helps you understand the behavior of the code, and it may also uncover hidden bugs. Through the new context menu item "Generate Inputs / Outputs Table" in the Visual Studio editor, you can invoke Code Digger to analyze your code. Code Digger computes and displays input-output pairs. Code Digger systematically hunts for bugs, exceptions, and assertion failures.
testing  constraint-solving  solver  witchcraft  magic  dot-net  coding  tests  code-digger  microsoft 
april 2013 by jm

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