jm + location   9

Why is this company tracking where you are on Thanksgiving?
Creepy:
To do this, they tapped a company called SafeGraph that provided them with 17 trillion location markers for 10 million smartphones.
The data wasn’t just staggering in sheer quantity. It also appears to be extremely granular. Researchers “used this data to identify individuals' home locations, which they defined as the places people were most often located between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m.,” wrote The Washington Post. [....]
This means SafeGraph is looking at an individual device and tracking where its owner is going throughout their day. A common defense from companies that creepily collect massive amounts of data is that the data is only analyzed in aggregate; for example, Google’s database BigQuery, which allows organizations to upload big data sets and then query them quickly, promises that all its public data sets are “fully anonymized” and “contain no personally-identifying information.” In multiple press releases from SafeGraph’s partners, the company’s location data is referred to as “anonymized,” but in this case they seem to be interpreting the concept of anonymity quite liberally given the specificity of the data.
Most people probably don’t realize that their Thanksgiving habits could end up being scrutinized by strangers.
It’s unclear if users realize that their data is being used this way, but all signs point to no. (SafeGraph and the researchers did not immediately respond to questions.) SafeGraph gets location data from “from numerous smartphone apps,” according to the researchers.
safegraph  apps  mobile  location  tracking  surveillance  android  iphone  ios  smartphones  big-data 
24 days ago by jm
Internet mapping turned a remote farm into a digital hell
I think this a bit of a legal issue for MaxMind:
The trouble for the Taylor farm started in 2002, when a Massachusetts-based digital mapping company called MaxMind decided it wanted to provide “IP intelligence” to companies who wanted to know the geographic location of a computer to, for example, show the person using it relevant ads or to send the person a warning letter if they were pirating music or movies.
maxmind  fail  location  ip  geodata  gps  mapping  kansas 
april 2016 by jm
what3emojis?
Is it too late to replace Eircode?
Addresses are hard. Who can remember street addresses or latitude/longitude pairs? You could do much better with three totally random English words, but then there’s that pesky language barrier. No system is perfect, except for emoji.
eircode  maps  parody  via:nelson  location  geocoding  mapping  pile-of-poo 
september 2015 by jm
Eircode - The Alternatives
lest we forget -- this is a 2014-era writeup of OpenPostcode (open), Loc8 and GoCode (proprietary) as alternative options to the Eircode system
eircode  openpostcode  loc8  gocode  ireland  geocoding  mapping  location  history  open-data 
july 2015 by jm
Eircode postcodes will cost lives, warn emergency workers
A group representing frontline emergency staff has warned lives will be lost unless the Government reverses its decision on a new national postcode system due to be rolled out next spring.

John Kidd, chairman of the Irish Fire and Emergency Services Association, said the “mainly random nature” of the Eircode system would mean errors by users would go unnoticed, as well as cause confusion and may be “catastrophic” in terms of sending services to the wrong location.

[....]

Neil McDonnell, general manager of the Freight Transport Association Ireland, said he understood Mr Kidd’s concerns. “Take, for example, two adjacent houses in Glasnevin, Dublin,” said Mr McDonnell. “One could be D11 ZXQ8, the other one D11 67TR. The four-character unique identifier is completely random, with no sequence or algorithm linking one house to the other.”
eircode  fail  postcodes  ireland  geo  location  gps  emergency 
october 2014 by jm
Postcodes at last but random numbers don’t address efficiency
Karlin Lillington assembles a fine collection of quotes from various sources panning the new Eircode system:
Critics say the opportunity has been missed to use Ireland’s clean-slate status to produce a technologically innovative postcode system that would be at the cutting edge globally; similar to the competitive leap that was provided when the State switched to a digital phone network in the 1980s, well ahead of most of the world.
Instead, say organisations such as the Freight Transport Association of Ireland (FTAI), the proposed seven-digit format of scrambled letters and numbers is almost useless for a business sector that should most benefit from a proper postcode system: transport and delivery companies, from international giants like FedEx and UPS down to local courier, delivery and service supplier firms.
Because each postcode will reveal the exact address of a home or business, privacy advocates are concerned that online use of postcodes could link many types of internet activity, including potentially sensitive online searches, to a specific household or business.
eircode  government  fail  ireland  postcodes  location  ftai  random 
september 2014 by jm
The lessons I learnt from my iPhone mugging | Benjamin Cohen on Technology
some good tips on iPhone security settings, in particular disabling the ability to turn off location services via Restrictions. I should do this
crime  iphone  location  london  mugging  phones  security  theft 
may 2012 by jm
BBC News - Sentinel project research reveals UK GPS jammer use
GPS jamming was this commonplace? I had no idea. '"We believe there's between 50 and 450 occurrences in the UK every day," said Charles Curry of Chronos Technology, the company leading the project, though he stressed that they were still analysing the data.' [...] "Most of them are used by people who don't want their vehicles to be tracked." (via Tim Bunce)
via:timbunce  jamming  gps  uk  location  chronos 
february 2012 by jm

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