jm + linus-torvalds   2

Systemd: Harbinger of the Linux apocalypse
While there are many defensible aspects of Systemd, other aspects boggle the mind. Not the least of these was that, as of a few months ago, trying to debug the kernel from the boot line would cause the system to crash. This was because of Systemd's voracious logging and the fact that Systemd responds to the "debug" flag on the kernel boot line -- a flag meant for the kernel, not anything else. That, straight up, is a bug.

However, the Systemd developers didn't see it that way and actively fought with those experiencing the problem. Add the fact that one of the Systemd developers was banned by Linus Torvalds for poor attitude and bad design and another was responsible for causing significant issues with Linux audio support, but blamed the problem on everything else but his software, and you have a bad situation on your hands.

There's no shortage of egos in the open source development world. There's no shortage of new ideas and veteran developers and administrators pooh-poohing something new simply because it's new. But there are also 45 years of history behind Unix and extremely good reasons it's still flourishing. Tools designed like Systemd do not fit the Linux mold, to their own detriment. Systemd's design has more in common with Windows than with Unix -- down to the binary logging.


The link re systemd consuming the "debug" kernel boot arg is a canonical example of inflexible coders refusing to fix their own bugs. (via Jason Dixon)
systemd  linux  red-hat  egos  linus-torvalds  unix  init  booting  debugging  logging  design  software  via:obfuscurity 
august 2014 by jm
Linux nukes 386 support
"there's a nostalgic cost: your old original 386 DX33 system from early 1991 won't be able to boot modern Linux kernels anymore. Sniff."

Now *THAT* is backwards compatibility.
linux  backwards-compatibility  386  history  linus-torvalds 
december 2012 by jm

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