jm + light   6

Single Trapped Atom Captures Science Photography Competition's top prize - EPSRC website
An image of a single positively-charged strontium atom, held near motionless by electric fields, has won the overall prize in a national science photography competition, organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

‘Single Atom in an Ion Trap’, by David Nadlinger, from the University of Oxford, shows the atom held by the fields emanating from the metal electrodes surrounding it. The distance between the small needle tips is about two millimetres.

When illuminated by a laser of the right blue-violet colour the atom absorbs and re-emits light particles sufficiently quickly for an ordinary camera to capture it in a long exposure photograph. The winning picture was taken through a window of the ultra-high vacuum chamber that houses the ion trap.
atom  photography  science  strontium  ion-traps  light 
4 weeks ago by jm
Great comment on the "realism" of space photos
In short, the answer to the question “is this what it would look like if I was there?” is almost always no, but that is true of every photograph. The photos taken from space cameras are no more fake or false than the photos taken from any camera. Like all photos they are a visual interpretation using color to display data. Most space photos have information online about how they were created, what filters were used, and all kinds of interesting details about processing. The discussion about whether a space photo is real or fake is meaningless. There's no distinction between photoshopped and not. It's a nuanced view but the nature of the situation demands it.
photography  photos  space  cassini  probes  cameras  light  wavelengths  science  vision  realism  real 
november 2016 by jm
Shadows in the Woods
beautiful German boardgame, suitable for playing with kids -- an adult moves a tealight candle around the board, while kids take turns moving gnomes around in the shadows behind tall "trees". recommended by JK
games  boardgames  german  kids  candles  light 
november 2013 by jm
seeing into the UV spectrum after Cataract Surgery with Crystalens
I've been very happy so far with the Crystalens implant for Cataract Surgery [...] one unexpected/interesting aspect is I see a violet glow that others do not - perhaps I'm more sensitive to the low end of the visible light spectrum.

(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  science  perception  augmentation  uv  light  sight  cool  cataracts  surgery  lens  eyes 
june 2013 by jm
A Slower Speed of Light
a first-person game prototype in which players navigate a 3D space while picking up orbs that reduce the speed of light in increments. Custom-built, open-source relativistic graphics code allows the speed of light in the game to approach the player’s own maximum walking speed. Visual effects of special relativity gradually become apparent to the player, increasing the challenge of gameplay. These effects, rendered in realtime to vertex accuracy, include the Doppler effect (red- and blue-shifting of visible light, and the shifting of infrared and ultraviolet light into the visible spectrum); the searchlight effect (increased brightness in the direction of travel); time dilation (differences in the perceived passage of time from the player and the outside world); Lorentz transformation (warping of space at near-light speeds); and the runtime effect (the ability to see objects as they were in the past, due to the travel time of light). Players can choose to share their mastery and experience of the game through Twitter. A Slower Speed of Light combines accessible gameplay and a fantasy setting with theoretical and computational physics research to deliver an engaging and pedagogically rich experience.
games  physics  mit  science  light  relativity 
april 2013 by jm
Ireland at night
the real deal -- a photo of Ireland, at night, from the ISS. I always assumed those patches of light were exagerrated for effect, but they're genuine!
ireland  iss  light  night  space  photos  from delicious
november 2010 by jm

Copy this bookmark: