jm + learning   12

A history of the neural net/tank legend in AI, and other examples of reward hacking
@gwern: "A history of the neural net/tank legend in AI: https://t.co/2s4AOGMS3a (Feel free to suggest more sightings or examples of reward hacking!)"
gwern  history  ai  machine-learning  ml  genetic-algorithms  neural-networks  perceptron  learning  training  data  reward-hacking 
8 weeks ago by jm
Teaching Students to Code - What Works
Lynn Langit describing her work as part of Microsoft Digigirlz and TKP to teach thousands of kids worldwide to code. Describes a curriculum from "K" (4-6-year olds) learning computational thinking with a block-based programming environment like Scratch, up to University level, solving problems with public clouds like AWS' free tier.
education  learning  coding  teaching  tkp  lynn-langit  scratch  kids 
september 2017 by jm
Air Canada near-miss: Air traffic controllers make split-second decisions in a culture of "psychological safety" — Quartz
“’Just culture’ as a term emerged from air traffic control in the late 1990s, as concern was mounting that air traffic controllers were unfairly cited or prosecuted for incidents that happened to them while they were on the job,” Sidney Dekker, a professor, writer, and director of the Safety Science Innovation Lab at Griffith University in Australia, explains to Quartz in an email. Eurocontrol, the intergovernmental organization that focuses on the safety of airspace across Europe, has “adopted a harmonized ‘just culture’ that it encourages all member countries and others to apply to their air traffic control organizations.”

[...] One tragic example of what can happen when companies don’t create a culture where employees feel empowered to raise questions or admit mistakes came to light in 2014, when an investigation into a faulty ignition switch that caused more than 100 deaths at GM Motors revealed a toxic culture of denying errors and deflecting blame within the firm. The problem was later attributed to one engineer who had not disclosed an obvious issue with the flawed switch, but many employees spoke of extreme pressure to put costs and delivery times before all other considerations, and to hide large and small concerns.

(via JG)
just-culture  atc  air-traffic-control  management  post-mortems  outages  reliability  air-canada  disasters  accidents  learning  psychological-safety  work 
august 2017 by jm
Mining High-Speed Data Streams: The Hoeffding Tree Algorithm
This paper proposes a decision tree learner for data streams, the Hoeffding Tree algorithm, which comes with the guarantee that the learned decision tree is asymptotically nearly identical to that of a non-incremental learner using infinitely many examples. This work constitutes a significant step in developing methodology suitable for modern ‘big data’ challenges and has initiated a lot of follow-up research. The Hoeffding Tree algorithm has been covered in various textbooks and is available in several public domain tools, including the WEKA Data Mining platform.
hoeffding-tree  algorithms  data-structures  streaming  streams  cep  decision-trees  ml  learning  papers 
august 2015 by jm
Inceptionism: Going Deeper into Neural Networks
This is amazing, and a little scary.
If we choose higher-level layers, which identify more sophisticated features in images, complex features or even whole objects tend to emerge. Again, we just start with an existing image and give it to our neural net. We ask the network: “Whatever you see there, I want more of it!” This creates a feedback loop: if a cloud looks a little bit like a bird, the network will make it look more like a bird. This in turn will make the network recognize the bird even more strongly on the next pass and so forth, until a highly detailed bird appears, seemingly out of nowhere.

An enlightening comment from the G+ thread:

This is the most fun we've had in the office in a while. We've even made some of those 'Inceptionistic' art pieces into giant posters. Beyond the eye candy, there is actually something deeply interesting in this line of work: neural networks have a bad reputation for being strange black boxes that that are opaque to inspection. I have never understood those charges: any other model (GMM, SVM, Random Forests) of any sufficient complexity for a real task is completely opaque for very fundamental reasons: their non-linear structure makes it hard to project back the function they represent into their input space and make sense of it. Not so with backprop, as this blog post shows eloquently: you can query the model and ask what it believes it is seeing or 'wants' to see simply by following gradients. This 'guided hallucination' technique is very powerful and the gorgeous visualizations it generates are very evocative of what's really going on in the network.
art  machine-learning  algorithm  inceptionism  research  google  neural-networks  learning  dreams  feedback  graphics 
june 2015 by jm
Arduino Tutorial
Ladyada's intro to electronics and microcontrollers using Arduino. Some day I'll get around to refreshing my memory, it's been years since I fiddled with a resistor ;)
electronics  arduino  hardware  gadgets  learning  tutorial  microcontrollers  embedded-systems  ladyada 
july 2014 by jm
Keyes New Starter Kit for Arduino Fans
$53 for a reasonable-looking Arduino starter kit, from DealExtreme. cheap cheap! In the inimitable DX style:
Keyes new beginner starter kit, pay more attention to beginners learning. Users can get rid of the difficult technological learning, from module used to quick start production.
learning  arduino  hardware  hacking  robotics  toys  dealextreme  tobuy 
july 2014 by jm
Learn.code.org
Teaches the basics of computer science - K-8 Intro to CS, 15-25 hours. Introduces core CS and programming concepts, with lots of nice graphics, scenarios and characters from games to get the kids hooked ;) Recommended by Tom Raftery; his youngest (7yo) is having great fun with it.
education  programming  learning  coding  kids  k-8  code.org  games 
may 2014 by jm
joshua's blog: overclocking the lecture
Joshua's old tip on watching videos at 2x speed using Perian
quicktime  video  hacks  mac  speed  lectures  presentations  learning 
april 2013 by jm
Does it run Minecraft? Well, since you ask…
Going by the number of Minecraft fans among my friends' sons and daughters in the 8-12 age group, this is a great idea:
We sent a bunch of [Raspberry Pi] boards out to Notch and the guys at Mojang in Stockholm a little while back, and they’ve produced a port of Minecraft: Pocket Edition which they’re calling  Minecraft: Pi Edition. It’ll carry a revised feature set and support for several programming languages, so you can code direct into Minecraft before you start playing. (Or you can just – you know – play.)
minecraft  gaming  programming  coding  raspberry-pi  kids  learning  education 
november 2012 by jm
Estonia introduces coding classes to 8-year-olds
'ProgreTiiger education will start with students in the first grade, which starts around the age of 7 or 8 for Estonians. The compsci education will continue through a student’s final years of public school, around age 16. Teachers are being trained on the new skills, and private sector IT companies are also getting involved, which makes sense, given that these entities will likely end up being the long-term beneficiaries of a technologically literate populace. The ProgreTiiger program is launching at a few pilot schools and will soon be rolling out to all general education schools in Estonia.'
estonia  education  coding  programming  kids  children  students  learning  school 
september 2012 by jm
Eight Real Tales of Learning Computer Science as a High School Girl
'All students at Stuyvesant High School are required to take a year of computer science. As it turns out, the advanced computer science classes skew mostly male anyway. But for a year, boys and girls get exposed to computer programming together. We asked Mike Zamansky, the head of the computer science program, to share some stories from his female students. They did us one better. Eight students sent in first-hand accounts of what it’s like to learn computer programming as a teenage girl.' Some interesting comments here. This topic is weighing on my mind now that I have two girls...
schools  learning  education  computer-science  technology  nyc  girls  teenage 
june 2012 by jm

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