jm + league-of-legends   4

Riot Games Seek Court Justice After Internet Provider Deliberately Causes In-Game Lag
Pretty damning for Time-Warner Cable:
When it seemed that the service provider couldn’t sink any lower, they opted to hold Riot to a ‘lag ransom’. Following Riot’s complaints regarding the inexplicable lag the player base were experiencing, TWC offered to magically solve the issue, a hardball tactic to which Riot finally admitted defeat in August of 2015. Before the deal was finalised, lag and data-packet loss for League of Legends players were far above the standards Riot was aiming for. Miraculously, after the two tech companies reached an unpleasant deal, the numbers improved.
ftc  fcc  twc  time-warner  cable  isps  network-neutrality  league-of-legends  internet 
6 weeks ago by jm
League of Legends win-rates vs latency analysed
It appears that more mechanically intensive champions are more affected by latency, while tankier champions or those with point-and-click abilities are less affected by latency.


(via Nelson)
games  league-of-legends  latency  ping  gaming  internet  via:nelson 
december 2015 by jm
UK porn filter blocks game update that contained 'sex' in URL
Staggeringly inept. The UK national porn filter blocks based on a regexp match of the URL against /.*sex.*/i -- the good old "Scunthorpe problem". Better, it returns a 404 response. This is also a good demonstration of how web filtering has unintended side effects, breaking third-party software updates with its false positives.
The update to online strategy game League of Legends was disrupted by the internet filter because the software attempted to access files that accidentally include the word “sex” in the middle of their file names. The block resulted in the update failing with “file not found” errors, which are usually created by missing files or broken updates on the part of the developers.
uk  porn  filtering  guardian  regular-expressions  false-positives  scunthorpe  http  web  league-of-legends  sex 
january 2014 by jm
"Toxic" behaviour in games is largely from "usually good" people
Only 5% of toxic behavior comes from toxic people; 77% of it comes from people who are usually good. That finding has all sorts of implications for how to stop toxic behavior in an online community. It’s not enough to just ban the jerks; good people have bad days too. Instead you have to teach the whole community what the community standards are. And quickly identify people who are having a bad day, intervene before their toxicity infects too many other people.


Great post by Nelson.
gaming  toxic  bad-behaviour  trolls  abuse  online  games  league-of-legends 
july 2013 by jm

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