jm + law-enforcement   9

The tyranny of the algorithm yet again...
Paypal will no longer handle payments if the user's address includes the word "Isis":
That these place names exist won't be a surprise to anyone familiar with English limnology - the study of rivers and inland waters. As Wikipedia helpfully tells us, "The Isis is the name given to the part of the River Thames above Iffley Lock which flows through the university city of Oxford". In at least one local primary school I'm familiar with, the classes are called Windrush, Cherwell, Isis and Thames.

[...] Now PayPal has decided that they are not prepared to facilitate payments for goods to be delivered to an address which includes the word "Isis". An Isis street resident ran into some unexpected difficulties when attempting to purchase a small quantity of haberdashery on the internet with the aid of a PayPal account. The transaction would not process. In puzzlement she eventually got irritated enough to brave the 24/7 customer support telephone tag labyrinth. The short version of the response from the eventual real person she managed to get through to was that PayPal have blacklisted addresses which include the name "Isis". They will not process payments for goods to be delivered to an Isis related address, whatever state of privileged respectability the residents of such properties may have earned or inherited in their lifetimes to this point.


One has to wonder if this also brings the risk of adding the user to a secret list, somewhere. Trial by algorithm.
isis  algorithms  automation  fail  law-enforcement  paypal  uk  rivers 
june 2016 by jm
Big Brother Watch on Twitter: "Anyone can legally have their phone or computer hacked by the police, intelligence agencies, HMRC and others #IPBill https://t.co/3ZS610srCJ"
As Glynn Moody noted, if UK police, intelligence agencies, HMRC and others call all legally hack phones and computers, that also means that digital evidence can be easily and invisibly planted. This will undermine future court cases in the UK, which seems like a significant own goal...
hmrc  police  gchq  uk  hacking  security  law-enforcement  evidence  law 
december 2015 by jm
Police have asked Dropcam for video from people's home cameras -- Fusion
“Like any responsible father, Hugh Morrison had installed cameras in every room in the flat,” is the opening line of Intrusion, a 2012 novel set in the near future. Originally installed so that Hugh and his wife can keep an eye on their kids, the Internet-connected cameras wind up being used later in the novel by police who tap into the feeds to monitor the couple chatting on their couch when they are suspected of anti-societal behavior. As with so many sci-fi scenarios, the novel’s vision was prophetic. People are increasingly putting small Internet-connected cameras into their homes. And law enforcement officials are using the cameras to collect evidence about them.
privacy  dropcam  cameras  surveillance  law-enforcement 
february 2015 by jm
Swiss Authorities Arrest Bot for Buying Drugs and Fake Passport
A bot created by a group of artists spent the last few months selecting items at random from a Silk Road-style darknet marketplace, buying them with Bitcoin, and having them shipped to a gallery in Switzerland. After the it bought some ecstasy pills and a counterfeit passport, we asked: How will authorities deal with the complex legal and moral issue of a piece of artificial intelligence breaking the law? It turns out, the answer was simple: just arrest the computer.
drugs  darknet  bitcoin  ecstasy  art  bots  law-enforcement  switzerland 
january 2015 by jm
Punished for Being Poor: Big Data in the Justice System
This is awful. Totally the wrong tool for the job -- a false positive rate which is miniscule for something like spam filtering, could translate to a really horrible outcome for a human life.
Currently, over 20 states use data-crunching risk-assessment programs for sentencing decisions, usually consisting of proprietary software whose exact methods are unknown, to determine which individuals are most likely to re-offend. The Senate and House are also considering similar tools for federal sentencing. These data programs look at a variety of factors, many of them relatively static, like criminal and employment history, age, gender, education, finances, family background, and residence. Indiana, for example, uses the LSI-R, the legality of which was upheld by the state’s supreme court in 2010. Other states use a model called COMPAS, which uses many of the same variables as LSI-R and even includes high school grades. Others are currently considering the practice as a way to reduce the number of inmates and ensure public safety. (Many more states use or endorse similar assessments when sentencing sex offenders, and the programs have been used in parole hearings for years.) Even the American Law Institute has embraced the practice, adding it to the Model Penal Code, attesting to the tool’s legitimacy.



(via stroan)
via:stroan  statistics  false-positives  big-data  law  law-enforcement  penal-code  risk  sentencing 
august 2014 by jm
Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied on a Whole City
The law-enforcement pervasive-surveillance CCTV PVR.
In a secret test of mass surveillance technology, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department sent a civilian aircraft* over Compton, California, capturing high-resolution video of everything that happened inside that 10-square-mile municipality. Compton residents weren't told about the spying, which happened in 2012. "We literally watched all of Compton during the times that we were flying, so we could zoom in anywhere within the city of Compton and follow cars and see people," Ross McNutt of Persistence Surveillance Systems told the Center for Investigative Reporting, which unearthed and did the first reporting on this important story. The technology he's trying to sell to police departments all over America can stay aloft for up to six hours. Like Google Earth, it enables police to zoom in on certain areas. And like TiVo, it permits them to rewind, so that they can look back and see what happened anywhere they weren't watching in real time. 


(via New Aesthetic)
pvr  cctv  law-enforcement  police  compton  los-angeles  law  surveillance  future 
april 2014 by jm
Mail from the (Velvet) Cybercrime Underground
Brian Krebs manages to thwart an attempted framing for possession of Silk Road heroin. bloody hell
silk-road  drugs  bitcoin  ecommerce  brian-krebs  crime  framed  cybercrime  russia  scary  law-enforcement 
july 2013 by jm
F.B.I. Seizes Web Servers, Knocking Sites Offline
law enforcement fail. "the agents took entire server racks, perhaps because they mistakenly thought that “one enclosure is = to one server,” [DigitalOne's CEO] said in an e-mail."
search-and-seizure  law-enforcement  fbi  fail  datacenters  racks  digitalone  usa  hosting 
june 2011 by jm
The first Irish case on defamation via autocomplete
Google Instant has picked up people searching for 'Ballymascanlon hotel receivership' and is now offering this as an autocomplete option -- cue defamation lawsuit. Defamation via machine learning
machine-learning  defamation  google  google-instant  search  ballymascanlon  hotels  autocomplete  law-enforcement 
june 2011 by jm

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