jm + keys   6

Stop it with short PGP key IDs!
What happened today? We still don't really know, but it seems we found a first potentially malicious collision — that is, the first "nonacademic" case. Enrico found two keys sharing the 9F6C6333 short ID, apparently belonging to the same person (as would be the case of Asheesh, mentioned above). After contacting Gustavo, though, he does not know about the second — That is, it can be clearly regarded as an impersonation attempt. Besides, what gave away this attempt are the signatures it has: Both keys are signed by what appears to be the same three keys: B29B232A, F2C850CA and 789038F2. Those three keys are not (yet?) uploaded to the keyservers, though... But we can expect them to appear at any point in the future. We don't know who is behind this, or what his purpose is. We just know this looks very evil.
Now, don't panic: Gustavo's key is safe. Same for his certifiers, Marga, Agustín and Maxy. It's just a 32-bit collision. So, in principle, the only parties that could be cheated to trust the attacker are humans, right? Nope.
Enrico tested on the PGP pathfinder & key statistics service, a keyserver that finds trust paths between any two arbitrary keys in the strong set. Surprise: The pathfinder works on the short key IDs, even when supplied full fingerprints. So, it turns out I have three faked trust paths into our impostor.
pgp  gpg  keys  collisions  hashing  security  debian 
june 2016 by jm
Vault
HashiCorp's take on the secrets-storage system. looks good
hashicorp  deployment  security  secrets  authentication  vault  storage  keys  key-rotation 
april 2015 by jm
credstash
'CredStash is a very simple, easy to use credential management and distribution system that uses AWS Key Management System (KMS) for key wrapping and master-key storage, and DynamoDB for credential storage and sharing.'
aws  credstash  python  security  keys  key-management  secrets  kms 
april 2015 by jm
Keeping Your Car Safe From Electronic Thieves - NYTimes.com
In a normal scenario, when you walk up to a car with a keyless entry and try the door handle, the car wirelessly calls out for your key so you don’t have to press any buttons to get inside. If the key calls back, the door unlocks. But the keyless system is capable of searching for a key only within a couple of feet. Mr. Danev said that when the teenage girl turned on her device, it amplified the distance that the car can search, which then allowed my car to talk to my key, which happened to be sitting about 50 feet away, on the kitchen counter. And just like that, open sesame.


What the hell -- who designed a system that would auto-unlock based on signal strength alone?!!
security  fail  cars  keys  signal  proximity  keyless-entry  prius  toyota  crime  amplification  power-amplifiers  3db  keyless 
april 2015 by jm
Keywhiz
'a secret management and distribution service [from Square] that is now available for everyone. Keywhiz helps us with infrastructure secrets, including TLS certificates and keys, GPG keyrings, symmetric keys, database credentials, API tokens, and SSH keys for external services — and even some non-secrets like TLS trust stores. Automation with Keywhiz allows us to seamlessly distribute and generate the necessary secrets for our services, which provides a consistent and secure environment, and ultimately helps us ship faster. [...]

Keywhiz has been extremely useful to Square. It’s supported both widespread internal use of cryptography and a dynamic microservice architecture. Initially, Keywhiz use decoupled many amalgamations of configuration from secret content, which made secrets more secure and configuration more accessible. Over time, improvements have led to engineers not even realizing Keywhiz is there. It just works. Please check it out.'
square  security  ops  keys  pki  key-distribution  key-rotation  fuse  linux  deployment  secrets  keywhiz 
april 2015 by jm
Good advice on running large-scale database stress tests
I've been bitten by poor key distribution in tests in the past, so this is spot on: 'I'd run it with Zipfian, Pareto, and Dirac delta distributions, and I'd choose read-modify-write transactions.'

And of course, a dataset bigger than all combined RAM.

Also: http://smalldatum.blogspot.ie/2014/04/biebermarks.html -- the "Biebermark", where just a single row out of the entire db is contended on in a read/modify/write transaction: "the inspiration for this is maintaining counts for [highly contended] popular entities like Justin Bieber and One Direction."
biebermark  benchmarks  testing  performance  stress-tests  databases  storage  mongodb  innodb  foundationdb  aphyr  measurement  distributions  keys  zipfian 
december 2014 by jm

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