jm + kellabyte   2

Haywire
kellabyte's hack in progress -- 'an asynchronous HTTP server framework written in C. The goal of Haywire is to learn how to create a server with a minimal feature set that can handle a high rate of requests and connections with as low of latency and resource usage as possible. Haywire uses the event loop based libuv platform layer that node.js is built on top of (also written in C). libuv abstracts IOCP on Windows and epoll/kqueue/event ports/etc. on Unix systems to provide efficient asynchronous I/O on all supported platforms.'

Outperforms libevent handily, it seems. Apache-licensed.
server  http  asynchronous  libuv  haywire  kellabyte  c  events  open-source  asl2 
april 2014 by jm
Kelly "kellabyte" Sommers on Redis' "relaxed CP" approach to the CAP theorem

Similar to ACID properties, if you partially provide properties it means the user has to _still_ consider in their application that the property doesn't exist, because sometimes it doesn't. In you're fsync example, if fsync is relaxed and there are no replicas, you cannot consider the database durable, just like you can't consider Redis a CP system. It can't be counted on for guarantees to be delivered. This is why I say these systems are hard for users to reason about. Systems that partially offer guarantees require in-depth knowledge of the nuances to properly use the tool. Systems that explicitly make the trade-offs in the designs are easier to reason about because it is more obvious and _predictable_.
kellabyte  redis  cp  ap  cap-theorem  consistency  outages  reliability  ops  database  storage  distcomp 
december 2013 by jm

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