jm + juniper   5

Excellent post from Matthew Green on the Juniper backdoor
For the past several years, it appears that Juniper NetScreen devices have incorporated a potentially backdoored random number generator, based on the NSA's Dual_EC_DRBG algorithm. At some point in 2012, the NetScreen code was further subverted by some unknown party, so that the very same backdoor could be used to eavesdrop on NetScreen connections. While this alteration was not authorized by Juniper, it's important to note that the attacker made no major code changes to the encryption mechanism -- they only changed parameters. This means that the systems were potentially vulnerable to other parties, even beforehand. Worse, the nature of this vulnerability is particularly insidious and generally messed up.

[....] The end result was a period in which someone -- maybe a foreign government -- was able to decrypt Juniper traffic in the U.S. and around the world. And all because Juniper had already paved the road.

One of the most serious concerns we raise during [anti-law-enforcement-backdoor] meetings is the possibility that encryption backdoors could be subverted. Specifically, that a back door intended for law enforcement could somehow become a backdoor for people who we don't trust to read our messages. Normally when we talk about this, we're concerned about failures in storage of things like escrow keys. What this Juniper vulnerability illustrates is that the danger is much broader and more serious than that. The problem with cryptographic backdoors is not that they're the only way that an attacker can break intro our cryptographic systems. It's merely that they're one of the best. They take care of the hard work, the laying of plumbing and electrical wiring, so attackers can simply walk in and change the drapes.


(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  crypto  backdoors  politics  juniper  dual-ec-drbg  netscreen  vpn 
december 2015 by jm
ImperialViolet - Juniper: recording some Twitter conversations
Adam Langley on the Juniper VPN-snooping security hole:
... if it wasn't the NSA who did this, we have a case where a US gov­ern­ment back­door ef­fort (Dual-EC) laid the ground­work for some­one else to at­tack US in­ter­ests. Cer­tainly this at­tack would be a lot eas­ier given the pres­ence of a back­door-friendly RNG al­ready in place. And I've not even dis­cussed the SSH back­door. [...]
primes  ecc  security  juniper  holes  exploits  dual-ec-drbg  vpn  networking  crypto  prngs 
december 2015 by jm
Facebook introduce “Wedge” and “FBOSS"
a new top-of-rack network switch, code-named “Wedge,” and a new Linux-based operating system for that switch, code-named “FBOSS.” These projects break down the hardware and software components of the network stack even further, to provide a new level of visibility, automation, and control in the operation of the network. By combining the hardware and software modules together in new ways, “Wedge” and “FBOSS” depart from current networking design paradigms to leverage our experience in operating hundreds of thousands of servers in our data centers. In other words, our goal with these projects was to make our network look, feel, and operate more like the OCP servers we've already deployed, both in terms of hardware and software.


Sayonara, Cisco, and good riddance.
cisco  juniper  wedge  fboss  facebook  tor  switches  racks  networking  datacenter  routers 
june 2014 by jm
Shutterbits replacing hardware load balancers with local BGP daemons and anycast
Interesting approach. Potentially risky, though -- heavy use of anycast on a large-scale datacenter network could increase the scale of the OSPF graph, which scales exponentially. This can have major side effects on OSPF reconvergence time, which creates an interesting class of network outage in the event of OSPF flapping.

Having said that, an active/passive failover LB pair will already announce a single anycast virtual IP anyway, so, assuming there are a similar number of anycast IPs in the end, it may not have any negative side effects.

There's also the inherent limitation noted in the second-to-last paragraph; 'It comes down to what your hardware router can handle for ECMP. I know a Juniper MX240 can handle 16 next-hops, and have heard rumors that a software update will bump this to 64, but again this is something to keep in mind'. Taking a leaf from the LB design, and using BGP to load-balance across a smaller set of haproxy instances, would seem like a good approach to scale up.
scalability  networking  performance  load-balancing  bgp  exabgp  ospf  anycast  routing  datacenters  scaling  vips  juniper  haproxy  shutterstock 
may 2014 by jm
Juniper Adds Puppet support
This is super-cool.

'Network engineering no longer should be mundane tasks like conf, set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit o family inet address 10.1.1.1/24. How does mindless CLI work translate to efficiently spent time ? What if you need to change 300 devices? What if you are writing it by hand? An error-prone waste of time. Juniper today announced Puppet support for their 12.2R3,5 JUNOS code. This is compatible with EX4200, EX4550, and QFX3500 switches. These are top end switches, but this start is directly aimed at their DC and enterprise devices. Initially, the manifest interactions offered are interface, layer 2 interface, vlan, port aggregation groups, and device names.'

Based on what I saw in the Network Automation team in Amazon, this is an amazing leap forward; it'd instantly render obsolete a bunch of horrific SSH-CLI automation cruft.
ssh  cli  automation  networking  networks  puppet  ops  juniper  cisco 
august 2013 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: