jm + journalism   32

UW professor: The information war is real, and we’re losing it
Starbird sighed. “I used to be a techno-utopian. Now I can’t believe that I’m sitting here talking to you about all this.”


Yep :(
journalism  media  news  fake-news  infowars  twitter  facebook 
march 2017 by jm
How Internet Trolls Won the 2016 Presidential Election
Because this was a novel iteration of online anti-Semitic culture, to the normie media it was worthy of deeply concerned coverage that likely gave a bunch of anti-Semites, trolls, and anti-Semitic trolls exactly the attention and visibility they craved. All without any of them having to prove they were actually involved, meaningfully, in anti-Semitic politics. That’s just a lot of power to give to a group of anonymous online idiots without at least knowing how many of them are 15-year-old dweebs rather than, you know, actual Nazis. [...]

In the long run, as journalistic coverage of the internet is increasingly done by people with at least a baseline understanding of web culture, that coverage will improve. For now, though, things are grim: It’s hard not to feel like journalists and politicos are effectively being led around on a leash by a group of anonymous online idiots, many of whom don’t really believe in anything.
internet  journalism  politics  4chan  8chan  channers  trolls  nazis  racism  pepe-the-frog  trump 
september 2016 by jm
Tim Hunt "jokes" about women scientists. Or not. (with image, tweets) · deborahblum · Storify
'[Tim Hunt] said that while he meant to be ironic, he did think it was hard to collaborate with women because they are too emotional - that he was trying to be honest about the problems.' So much for the "nasty twitter took my jokes seriously" claims then.
twitter  science  misogyny  women  tim-hunt  deborah-blum  journalism 
june 2015 by jm
I Fooled Millions Into Thinking Chocolate Helps Weight Loss
“Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just beneath their update about the Germanwings crash. From there, it ricocheted around the internet and beyond, making news in more than 20 countries and half a dozen languages. It was discussed on television news shows. It appeared in glossy print, most recently in the June issue of Shape magazine (“Why You Must Eat Chocolate Daily”, page 128). Not only does chocolate accelerate weight loss, the study found, but it leads to healthier cholesterol levels and overall increased well-being. The Bild story quotes the study’s lead author, Johannes Bohannon, Ph.D., research director of the Institute of Diet and Health: “The best part is you can buy chocolate everywhere.”

I am Johannes Bohannon, Ph.D. Well, actually my name is John, and I’m a journalist. I do have a Ph.D., but it’s in the molecular biology of bacteria, not humans. The Institute of Diet and Health? That’s nothing more than a website. Other than those fibs, the study was 100 percent authentic. My colleagues and I recruited actual human subjects in Germany. We ran an actual clinical trial, with subjects randomly assigned to different diet regimes. And the statistically significant benefits of chocolate that we reported are based on the actual data. It was, in fact, a fairly typical study for the field of diet research. Which is to say: It was terrible science. The results are meaningless, and the health claims that the media blasted out to millions of people around the world are utterly unfounded.


Interesting bit: the online commenters commenting on the published stories quickly saw through the bullshit. Why can't the churnalising journos do that?
chocolate  journalism  science  diet  food  churnalism  pr  bild  health  clinical-trials  papers  peer-review  research 
may 2015 by jm
The Future Of The Culture Wars Is Here, And It's Gamergate
Like, say, the Christian right, which came together through the social media of its day — little-watched television broadcasts, church bulletins, newsletters—or the Tea Party, which found its way through self-selection on social media and through back channels, Gamergate, in the main, comprises an assortment of agitators who sense which way the winds are blowing and feel left out. It has found a mobilizing event, elicited response from the established press, and run a successful enough public relations campaign that it's begun attracting visible advocates who agree with the broad talking points and respectful-enough coverage from the mainstream press. If there is a ground war being waged, as the movement's increasingly militaristic rhetoric suggests, Gamergate is fighting largely unopposed.

A more important resemblance to the Tea Party, though, is in the way in which it's focused the anger of people who realize the world is changing, and not necessarily to their benefit.
culture  gaming  journalism  gamergate  tea-party  grim-meathook-future  culture-wars  misogyny 
october 2014 by jm
Game Devs on Gamergate (with images, tweets)
Welp, that's the end of my reading The Escapist. this is fucked up. 'these people say that this is a hate movement, but let's see what these white supremacists and serial harassers have to say'
ethics  gaming  journalism  the-escapist  gamergate  misogyny  sexism 
october 2014 by jm
The Broadcasting Association of Ireland and the NUJ agree: the internet must be regulated so that it can be 'brought into line'
'The Irish Times podcast ends with both the NUJ’s Seamus Dooley and Prof Kenny agreeing that somebody must regulate the internet so that it can be brought into line.'
regulation  ireland  law  dangerous  nuj  bai  journalism  censorship 
august 2014 by jm
Google's mighty mess-up on 'right to be forgotten' - Independent.ie
In this context, the search giant says that it has "a team of people reviewing each application individually". Really? Did this team of people decide that redacting links to an article reporting a criminal conviction was consistent with an individual's right to privacy and 'right to be forgotten'?

Either Google is deliberately letting egregious errors through to try and bait journalists and freedom of expression activists into protesting or its system at vetting 'right to be forgotten' applications is awfully flawed.
google  right-to-be-forgotten  privacy  law  ireland  adrian-weckler  journalism  freedom-of-expression  censorship  redaction 
july 2014 by jm
The leaked New York Times innovation report is one of the key documents of this media age » Nieman Journalism Lab
one of the world’s leading news organizations giving itself a rigorous self-examination. I’ve spoken with multiple digital-savvy Times staffers in recent days who described the report with words like “transformative” and “incredibly important” and “a big big moment for the future of the Times.” One admitted crying while reading it because it surfaced so many issues about Times culture that digital types have been struggling to overcome for years.


via Antoin. This is pretty insightful -- the death of the homepage is notable
nytimes  publishing  media  journalism  tech  internet  web  news  leaks  via:antoin 
may 2014 by jm
The colossal arrogance of Newsweek’s Bitcoin “scoop” | Ars Technica
Many aspects of the story already look like a caricature of journalism gone awry. The man Goodman fingered as being worth $400 million or more is just as modest as his house suggests. He’s had a stroke and struggles with other health issues. Unemployed since 2001, he strives to take care of basic needs for himself and his 93-year-old mother, according to a reddit post by his brother Arthur Nakamoto (whom Goodman quoted as calling his brother an “asshole”).

If Goodman has mystery evidence supporting the Dorian Nakamoto theory, it should have been revealed days ago. Otherwise, Newsweek and Goodman are delaying an inevitable comeuppance and doubling down on past mistakes. Nakamoto’s multiple denials on the record have changed the dynamic of the story. Standing by the story, at this point, is an attack on him and his credibility. The Dorian Nakamoto story is a “Dewey beats Truman” moment for the Internet age, with all of the hubris and none of the humor. It shouldn’t be allowed to end in the mists of “he said, she said.” Whether or not a lawsuit gets filed, Nakamoto v. Newsweek faces an imminent verdict in the court of public opinion: either the man is lying or the magazine is wrong.
dorian-nakamoto  newsweek  journalism  bitcoin  privacy  satoshi-nakamoto 
march 2014 by jm
Enemies of the Internet 2014: entities at the heart of censorship and surveillance | Enemies of the Internet
The mass surveillance methods employed in [the UK, USA, and India], many of them exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, are all the more intolerable because they will be used and indeed are already being used by authoritarians countries such as Iran, China, Turkmenistan, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain to justify their own violations of freedom of information. How will so-called democratic countries will able to press for the protection of journalists if they adopt the very practices they are criticizing authoritarian regimes for?


This is utterly jaw-dropping -- throughout the world, real-time mass-monitoring infrastructure is silently being dropped into place. France and India are particularly pervasive
journalism  censorship  internet  france  india  privacy  data-protection  surveillance  spying  law  snowden  authoritarianism 
march 2014 by jm
Opinion: How can we get over ‘Pantigate’?
The fact that RTÉ had agreed to pay damages (€80,000 in total, according to reports yesterday) to the ‘injured parties’, only came to light in an email from the [far-right Catholic lobby group Iona Institute] to its members last Tuesday.
Given the ramifications of the decision to make any kind of payment – regardless of the amount – both for the TV licence payer and those who voice contrarian opinions, the lack of coverage in print media as soon as the Iona email came to light marked a low point for print journalism in Ireland. Aside from a lead story on the damages printed in this paper last Wednesday and ongoing debate online, the media has been glacially slow with commentary and even reportage of the affair.
The debacle has untold ramifications for public life in this country. That many liberal commentators may now baulk at the opportunity to speak and write openly and honestly about homophobia is the most obvious issue here. Most worrying of all, however, is the question that with a referendum on the introduction of gay marriage on the horizon, how can we expect the national broadcaster to facilitate even-handed debate on the subject when they’ve already found themselves cowed before reaching the first hurdle?
homophobia  politics  ireland  libel  dissent  lobbying  defamation  law  gay-marriage  iona-institute  journalism  newspapers 
february 2014 by jm
Ryan Lizza: Why Won’t Obama Rein in the N.S.A.? : The New Yorker
Fantastic wrap-up of the story so far on the pervasive global surveillance story.
The history of the intelligence community, though, reveals a willingness to violate the spirit and the letter of the law, even with oversight. What’s more, the benefits of the domestic-surveillance programs remain unclear. Wyden contends that the N.S.A. could find other ways to get the information it says it needs. Even Olsen, when pressed, suggested that the N.S.A. could make do without the bulk-collection program. “In some cases, it’s a bit of an insurance policy,” he told me. “It’s a way to do what we otherwise could do, but do it a little bit more quickly.”

In recent years, Americans have become accustomed to the idea of advertisers gathering wide swaths of information about their private transactions. The N.S.A.’s collecting of data looks a lot like what Facebook does, but it is fundamentally different. It inverts the crucial legal principle of probable cause: the government may not seize or inspect private property or information without evidence of a crime. The N.S.A. contends that it needs haystacks in order to find the terrorist needle. Its definition of a haystack is expanding; there are indications that, under the auspices of the “business records” provision of the Patriot Act, the intelligence community is now trying to assemble databases of financial transactions and cell-phone location information. Feinstein maintains that data collection is not surveillance. But it is no longer clear if there is a distinction.
nsa  gchq  surveillance  spying  privacy  dianne-feinstein  new-yorker  journalism  long-reads  us-politics  probable-cause 
december 2013 by jm
Metropolitan police detained David Miranda for promoting 'political' causes | World news | The Observer
"We assess that Miranda is knowingly carrying material [...] the disclosure or threat of disclosure is designed to influence a government, and is made for the purpose of promoting a political or ideological cause. This therefore falls within the definition of terrorism."
security  david-miranda  journalism  censorship  terrorism  the-guardian 
november 2013 by jm
Schneier on Security: The NSA Is Breaking Most Encryption on the Internet
The new Snowden revelations are explosive. Basically, the NSA is able to decrypt most of the Internet. They're doing it primarily by cheating, not by mathematics.
It's joint reporting between the Guardian, the New York Times, and ProPublica.
I have been working with Glenn Greenwald on the Snowden documents, and I have seen a lot of them. These are my two essays on today's revelations.
Remember this: The math is good, but math has no agency. Code has agency, and the code has been subverted.
encryption  communication  government  nsa  security  bruce-schneier  crypto  politics  snooping  gchq  guardian  journalism 
september 2013 by jm
The Irish Times, terminations and Holles Street: The story that wasn’t there.
Summarising a very shoddy tale from our paper of record.
I don’t know what happened here. I don’t know whether there ever was a woman who met the description given by the Irish Times who suffered a medical crisis during pregnancy. I don’t know why a group of men in positions of authority in the Irish Times decided that, if there was such a woman, they had any right to tell the rest of the country about her experiences. I don’t know why, when they discovered that a mistake had been made in the one legal fact used to justify that decision they didn’t immediately apologise.

And I don’t know what happened between the 23rd August 2013 and 31st August 2013 to prompt them to print a shoulder shrugging ‘acceptance’ that the case ‘hadn’t happened’ and limit the paper’s apology to an institution, as opposed to its readers. But, from what I’ve seen this week, I do know one thing. Whatever questions readers might have, The Irish Times isn’t interested in giving them any answers.
irish-times  fail  shoddy  abortion  health  public-interest  journalism  pregnancy  corrections 
september 2013 by jm
Let Me Explain Why Miley Cyrus’ VMA Performance Was Our Top Story This Morning | The Onion - America's Finest News Source
Absolute genius from The Onion.
Those of us watching on Google Analytics saw the number of homepage visits skyrocket the second we put up that salacious image of Miley Cyrus dancing half nude on the VMA stage. But here’s where it gets great: We don’t just do a top story on the VMA performance and call it a day. No, no. We also throw in a slideshow called “Evolution of Miley,” which, for those of you who don’t know, is just a way for you to mindlessly click through 13 more photos of Miley Cyrus. And if we get 500,000 of you to do that, well, 500,000 multiplied by 13 means we can get 6.5 million page views on that slideshow alone. Throw in another slideshow titled “6 ‘don’t miss’ VMA moments,” and it’s starting to look like a pretty goddamned good Monday, numbers-wise. Also, there are two videos -- one of the event and then some bullshit two-minute clip featuring our “entertainment experts” talking about the performance. Side note: Advertisers, along with you idiots, love videos. Another side note: The Miley Cyrus story was in the same top spot we used for our 9/11 coverage.
humor  journalism  cnn  miley-cyrus  vma  news  funny  advertising  ads 
august 2013 by jm
David Miranda, schedule 7 and the danger that all reporters now face | Alan Rusbridger | Comment is free | The Guardian
The man was unmoved. And so one of the more bizarre moments in the Guardian's long history occurred – with two GCHQ security experts overseeing the destruction of hard drives in the Guardian's basement just to make sure there was nothing in the mangled bits of metal which could possibly be of any interest to passing Chinese agents. "We can call off the black helicopters," joked one as we swept up the remains of a MacBook Pro.

Whitehall was satisfied, but it felt like a peculiarly pointless piece of symbolism that understood nothing about the digital age. We will continue to do patient, painstaking reporting on the Snowden documents, we just won't do it in London. The seizure of Miranda's laptop, phones, hard drives and camera will similarly have no effect on Greenwald's work.

The state that is building such a formidable apparatus of surveillance will do its best to prevent journalists from reporting on it. Most journalists can see that. But I wonder how many have truly understood the absolute threat to journalism implicit in the idea of total surveillance, when or if it comes – and, increasingly, it looks like "when".

We are not there yet, but it may not be long before it will be impossible for journalists to have confidential sources. Most reporting – indeed, most human life in 2013 – leaves too much of a digital fingerprint. Those colleagues who denigrate Snowden or say reporters should trust the state to know best (many of them in the UK, oddly, on the right) may one day have a cruel awakening. One day it will be their reporting, their cause, under attack. But at least reporters now know to stay away from Heathrow transit lounges.
nsa  gchq  surveillance  spying  snooping  guardian  reporters  journalism  uk  david-miranda  glenn-greenwald  edward-snowden 
august 2013 by jm
My email to Irish Times Editor, sent 25th June
Daragh O'Brien noting 3 stories on 3 consecutive days voicing dangerously skewed misinformation about data protection and privacy law in Ireland:
There is a worrying pattern in these stories. The first two decry the Data Protection legislation (current and future) as being dangerous to children and damaging to the genealogy trade. The third sets up an industry “self-regulation” straw man and heralds it as progress (when it is decidedly not, serving only to further confuse consumers about their rights).

If I was a cynical person I would find it hard not to draw the conclusion that the Irish Times, the “paper of record” has been stooged by organisations who are resistant to the defence of and validation of fundamental rights to privacy as enshrined in the Data Protection Acts and EU Treaties, and in the embryonic Data Protection Regulation. That these stories emerge hot on the heels of the pendulum swing towards privacy concerns that the NSA/Prism revelations have triggered is, I must assume, a co-incidence. It cannot be the case that the Irish Times blindly publishes press releases without conducting cursory fact checking on the stories contained therein?

Three stories over three days is insufficient data to plot a definitive trend, but the emphasis is disconcerting. Is it the Irish Times’ editorial position that Data Protection legislation and the protection of fundamental rights is a bad thing and that industry self-regulation that operates in ignorance of legislation is the appropriate model for the future? It surely cannot be that press releases are regurgitated as balanced fact and news by the Irish Times without fact checking and verification? If I was to predict a “Data Protection killed my Puppy” type headline for tomorrow’s edition or another later this week would I be proved correct?
daragh-obrien  irish-times  iab  bias  advertising  newspapers  press-releases  journalism  data-protection  privacy  ireland 
june 2013 by jm
Flashback: How Yahoo Killed Flickr and Lost the Internet
This is about the best tech journalism I've ever read on Flickr. nice one Mat Honan
gizmodo  flickr  acquisition  mergers  yahoo  corporate-culture  mat-honan  tech  journalism 
may 2013 by jm
Swansea measles outbreak: was an MMR scare in the local press to blame?
Sixteen years ago, journalists had a much easier job assembling "balanced" stories about MMR in south Wales. When I wrote about the measles outbreak last week, I suggested that it was related to Andrew Wakefield's discredited 1998 Lancet research, but the Swansea contagion seems more likely to be the result of a separate scare a year earlier in the South Wales Evening Post. Before 1997, uptake of MMR in the distribution area of the Post was 91%, and 87.2% in the rest of Wales. After the Post's campaign, uptake in the distribution area fell to 77.4% (it was 86.8% in the rest of Wales).
That's almost a 14% drop where the Post had influence, compared with less than 3% elsewhere. In the dry wording of the BMJ, "the [South West Evening Post] campaign is the most likely explanation". In other words, what we can see in Swansea is the local effect of local reporting‚ in all probability, just a taster of what happens when the news irresponsibly creates unfounded terror.

[...] The 1997 coverage focused on a group of families who blamed MMR for various ailments in their children, including learning difficulties, digestive problems and autism‚ none of which have been found to have any connection with the vaccine.
The Post's coverage was at the time deemed a success, and in 1998 it won a prize for investigative reporting in the BT Wales Press Awards. That year, the SWEP ran at least 39 stories related to the alleged dangers of MMR. And yes, it's true that the paper never directly endorsed non-vaccination. What it did do was publicise the idea of "vaccine damage" as a risk, one that parents would then likely weigh up against the risk of contracting measles, mumps or rubella.
And this went beyond the reporting of parental anxieties‚ it was part of the Post's editorial line. One article is entitled "Young bodies cannot take it". The all-important "journalistic balance" was constantly available, thanks to campaigning parents and their solicitor Richard Barr. (It was Barr who engaged Wakefield for a lawsuit, leading to the "fishing expedition" research that became the Lancet paper.) They were happy to provide a quote on the dangers of the "triple jab", which health authorities were then obliged to rebut politely.
The Post also seemed to downplay the risk of measles, reporting on 6 July 1998 that "not a single child has been hit by the illness‚ despite a 13% drop in take-up levels". It's not parents who should feel embarrassed by the Swansea measles outbreak: some may have acted from overt dread at the prospect of harming their child, and some simply from omission, but all were encouraged by a press that focused on non-existent risks and downplayed the genuine horror of the diseases MMR prevents. The shame belongs to journalists: those of the South West Evening Post who allowed themselves to be recruited in the service of a speculative lawsuit, and any who let a specious devotion to "balance" overrule a duty to tell the truth.
south-wales  wales  mmr  health  vaccination  scares  journalism  ethics  disease  measles  south-wales-evening-post 
april 2013 by jm
The Daily Mail's frequent copyright abuse finally catches up with them
This is how you do it -- bravo to Alice Taylor, who got them fair and square as they did their usual trick of lifting copyrighted content without permission
copyright  journalism  photography  daily-mail  via:torrentfreak 
august 2011 by jm
In Focus - The Atlantic
Alan Taylor moves his iconic blog of photojournalism from the Boston Globe to The Atlantic
the-atlantic  photos  photojournalism  journalism  alan-taylor  news  newswires  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
No Sleep 'Til Brooklands: A True Story Of Daily Mail Lies (guest post)
how the Daily Mail (UK) works, via b3ta. mind-boggling misuse of one woman's comments to concoct a story, according to this
daily-mail  journalism  libel  media  newspapers  law  uk  via:b3ta  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
John Graham-Cumming: The Myth of the Boy Wizard
JGC on the Haystack mess. bad journalism by The Guardian, Newsweek and the Beeb, basically, single-sourcing articles without any corroborating backup from domain experts
journalism  haystack  the-grauniad  newsweek  bbc  news  cpj  jgc  from delicious
september 2010 by jm
Man Lives In Futuristic Sci-Fi World Where All His Interactions Take Place In Cyberspace | The Onion
'In the blink of an eye, this real-life Johnny Mnemonic keys in his encrypted, top-secret passcode and enters the fortified binary area from which all his personal communiqués are sent forth in a dizzying array of ones and zeroes.' brilliant pisstake of mid-'90s tech journalism (via Walter Higgins)
the-onion  funny  future  futurism  humour  internet  sf  via:walter  journalism  cyberpunk  1990s  cyberspace  from delicious
august 2010 by jm
the torture garden: On Hot Press and My Place In The Real Economy
it seems Hot Press have come up with some Paul-McGuinness-esque pro-IMRO one-sided turdery masquerading as journalism. shock me
imro  shakedown  hot-press  tat  journalism  ireland  dublin  from delicious
may 2010 by jm
Why it's time to lighten up about "weird" Japan
'Being majime (too serious) is not cool in Japan; likewise it is important for voyeurs of Japanese culture to recognize that most everything pop-culture-y that is exported to the West comes at us with a wink. If you're all up in arms about it, then maybe the joke is on you.'
japan  majime  seriousness  fun  weird  news  journalism  from delicious
december 2009 by jm
Me and Belle de Jour – ‘Could it be Brooke?’
LinkMachineGo knew the true identity of Belle du Jour way back when -- and set a Google trap to ensnare snooping journos. nice work
belle-du-jour  google  blogging  blogs  via:waxy  privacy  googlewhack  identity  daily-mail  journalism  from delicious
november 2009 by jm

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