jm + interviews   13

When the Children Crashed Dad’s BBC Interview: The Family Speaks - WSJ
Mr. Kelly describes his reaction as a mixture of surprise, embarrassment and amusement but also love and affection. The couple says they weren’t mad and didn’t scold the children. “I mean it was terribly cute,” Mr. Kelly said. “I saw the video like everybody else. My wife did a great job cleaning up a really unanticipated situation as best she possibly could... It was funny. If you watch the tape I was sort of struggling to keep my own laughs down. They’re little kids and that’s how things are.” “Yes I was mortified, but I also want my kids to feel comfortable coming to me,” Mr. Kelly said.


aww!
cute  family  bbc  interviews  funny  viral  kids  hippity-hoppity  robert-kelly 
6 weeks ago by jm
US immigration asking tech interview trivia questions now
what the absolute fuck. Celestine Omin on Twitter: "I was just asked to balance a Binary Search Tree by JFK's airport immigration. Welcome to America."
twitter  celestine-omin  us-politics  immigration  tests  interviews  bst  trees  data-structures  algorithms 
8 weeks ago by jm
Control theory meets machine learning
'DB: Is there a difference between how control theorists and machine learning researchers think about robustness and error?

BR: In machine learning, we almost always model our errors as being random rather than worst-case. In some sense, random errors are actually much more benign than worst-case errors. [...] In machine learning, by assuming average-case performance, rather than worst-case, we can design predictive algorithms by averaging out the errors over large data sets. We want to be robust to fluctuations in the data, but only on average. This is much less restrictive than the worst-case restrictions in controls.

DB: So control theory is model-based and concerned with worst case. Machine learning is data based and concerned with average case. Is there a middle ground?

BR: I think there is! And I think there's an exciting opportunity here to understand how to combine robust control and reinforcement learning. Being able to build systems from data alone simplifies the engineering process, and has had several recent promising results. Guaranteeing that these systems won't behave catastrophically will enable us to actually deploy machine learning systems in a variety of applications with major impacts on our lives. It might enable safe autonomous vehicles that can navigate complex terrains. Or could assist us in diagnostics and treatments in health care. There are a lot of exciting possibilities, and that's why I'm excited about how to find a bridge between these two viewpoints.'
control-theory  interviews  machine-learning  ml  worst-case  self-driving-cars  cs 
november 2015 by jm
Halcyon Days
Fantastic 1997-era book of interviews with the programmers behind some of the greatest games in retrogaming history:
Halcyon Days: Interviews with Classic Computer and Video Game Programmers was released as a commercial product in March 1997. At the time it was one of the first retrogaming projects to focus on lost history rather than game collecting, and certainly the first entirely devoted to the game authors themselves. Now a good number of the interviewees have their own web sites, but none of them did when I started contacting them in 1995. [...] If you have any of the giddy anticipation that I did whenever I picked up a magazine containing an interview with Mark Turmell or Dan [M.U.L.E.] Bunten, then you want to start reading.
book  games  history  coding  interviews  via:walter 
march 2015 by jm
interview with Google VP of SRE Ben Treynor
interviewed by Niall Murphy, no less ;). Some good info on what Google deems important from an ops/SRE perspective
sre  ops  devops  google  monitoring  interviews  ben-treynor 
may 2014 by jm
stuff Google has learned from their hiring data
A. On the hiring side, we found that [interview] brainteasers are a complete waste of time. How many golf balls can you fit into an airplane? How many gas stations in Manhattan? A complete waste of time. They don’t predict anything. They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart.

Instead, what works well are structured behavioral interviews, where you have a consistent rubric for how you assess people, rather than having each interviewer just make stuff up. Behavioral interviewing also works — where you’re not giving someone a hypothetical, but you’re starting with a question like, “Give me an example of a time when you solved an analytically difficult problem.” The interesting thing about the behavioral interview is that when you ask somebody to speak to their own experience, and you drill into that, you get two kinds of information. One is you get to see how they actually interacted in a real-world situation, and the valuable “meta” information you get about the candidate is a sense of what they consider to be difficult.

This makes sense, and matches what I learned in Amazon. Bad news for Microsoft though! (Correction: Adam Shostack got in touch to note that MS haven't done this for 10+ years either.)

Also, I like this:

A. One of the things we’ve seen from all our data crunching is that G.P.A.’s are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless — no correlation at all except for brand-new college grads, where there’s a slight correlation. Google famously used to ask everyone for a transcript and G.P.A.’s and test scores, but we don’t anymore, unless you’re just a few years out of school. We found that they don’t predict anything. What’s interesting is the proportion of people without any college education at Google has increased over time as well. So we have teams where you have 14 percent of the team made up of people who’ve never gone to college.
google  hiring  interviewing  interviews  brainteasers  gpa  microsoft  star  amazon 
june 2013 by jm
Deep In The Game: Not The RTE Guide
Good interview with Alan Maguire, the satirist behind the very funny @NotTheRTEGuide on Twitter:
I’ve always been a huge fan of TV Go Home and Charlie Brooker in general and it seemed like Irish TV and culture was a good target for the kind of barbed surrealism that he does. (I’m not claiming I’m in his league or anything but he’s the main influence). I was really surprised that there hadn’t been a parody RTÉ Guide already. TV listings are 140-ish characters already and the RTÉ Guide has a kind of weird place in Irish culture where everybody knows it but nobody our age really has any idea of what’s in it anymore. We associate it with a small-c conservatism, or I did at least and I play that up occasionally with the account.
nottherteguide  rte  rte-guide  ireland  funny  satire  interviews 
may 2013 by jm
Charanjit Singh on how he invented acid house ... by mistake
An interview (of sorts)! 'Cast your mind to the acid house scene and your immediate thought probably doesn't involve an ageing Bollywood session musician. Yet the softly spoken Indian man who greets me at the door of his friend's suburban Acton home on a sunny Sunday morning is credited with creating what some have labelled the first ever acid house record.'
acid-house  music  via:xxjfg  guardian  interviews  history  india  bollywood  ragas 
may 2011 by jm
IAMA person who sends "spam" email for a living
Reddit mass-interview of a spammer. apparently he's working on IPv6 support
reddit  spam  anti-spam  interviews  ipv6  iama  spammers  from delicious
october 2009 by jm
Hacking a Google Interview
course notes from a 4-day MIT course on tech interviewing (via Hacker News)
interviews  google  hiring  puzzles  mit  questions  coding  computer-science  algorithms 
august 2009 by jm

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