jm + internet   100

Uplink Latency of WiFi and 4G Networks
It's high. Wifi in particular shows high variability and long latency tails
wifi  3g  4g  mobile  networking  internet  latency  tcp 
yesterday by jm
The Emerging Global Web
*Really* intriguing slide deck on how Asia and Africa have invented new ways of operating a business via the internet, and are turning globalisation upside down (via Yoz)
via:yoz  africa  asia  globalisation  internet  web  mobile  payment  business  ecommerce  global 
2 days ago by jm
ImperialViolet - No, don't enable revocation checking
...because it doesn't stop attacks. Turning it on does nothing but slow things down. You can tell when something is security theater because you need some absurdly specific situation in order for it to be useful.
cryptography  crypto  heartbleed  ssl  security  tls  https  internet  revocation  crls 
2 days ago by jm
spoofing the samsung smart tv internet check
If this kind of bullshit -- a HTTP GET of an XML file from www.samsung.com -- is how the Samsung Smart TV firmware decides if the internet is working or not, I dread to think how crappy the rest of the code is. (At least in Netnote we performed a bunch of bigco-domain DNS lookups before giving up...)
smart-tv  samsung  fail  xml  http  internet  embedded-software  firmware  crap-code 
2 days ago by jm
Of Money, Responsibility, and Pride
Steve Marquess of the OpenSSL Foundation on their funding, and lack thereof:
I stand in awe of their talent and dedication, that of Stephen Henson in particular. It takes nerves of steel to work for many years on hundreds of thousands of lines of very complex code, with every line of code you touch visible to the world, knowing that code is used by banks, firewalls, weapons systems, web sites, smart phones, industry, government, everywhere. Knowing that you’ll be ignored and unappreciated until something goes wrong. The combination of the personality to handle that kind of pressure with the relevant technical skills and experience to effectively work on such software is a rare commodity, and those who have it are likely to already be a valued, well-rewarded, and jealously guarded resource of some company or worthy cause. For those reasons OpenSSL will always be undermanned, but the present situation can and should be improved. There should be at least a half dozen full time OpenSSL team members, not just one, able to concentrate on the care and feeding of OpenSSL without having to hustle commercial work. If you’re a corporate or government decision maker in a position to do something about it, give it some thought. Please. I’m getting old and weary and I’d like to retire someday.
funding  open-source  openssl  heartbleed  internet  security  money 
10 days ago by jm
Game servers: UDP vs TCP
this HN thread on the age-old UDP vs TCP question is way better than the original post -- lots of salient comments
udp  tcp  games  protocols  networking  latency  internet  gaming  hackernews 
22 days ago by jm
Enemies of the Internet 2014: entities at the heart of censorship and surveillance | Enemies of the Internet
The mass surveillance methods employed in [the UK, USA, and India], many of them exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, are all the more intolerable because they will be used and indeed are already being used by authoritarians countries such as Iran, China, Turkmenistan, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain to justify their own violations of freedom of information. How will so-called democratic countries will able to press for the protection of journalists if they adopt the very practices they are criticizing authoritarian regimes for?


This is utterly jaw-dropping -- throughout the world, real-time mass-monitoring infrastructure is silently being dropped into place. France and India are particularly pervasive
journalism  censorship  internet  france  india  privacy  data-protection  surveillance  spying  law  snowden  authoritarianism 
5 weeks ago by jm
How the Irish helped weave the web
Nice Irish Times article on the first 3 web servers in Ireland -- including the one I set up at Iona Technologies. 21 years ago!
history  ireland  tech  web  internet  www  james-casey  peter-flynn  irish-times  iona-technologies 
5 weeks ago by jm
Good explanation of exponential backoff
I've often had to explain this key feature verbosely, and it's hard to do without handwaving. Great to have a solid, well-explained URL to point to
exponential-backoff  backoff  retries  reliability  web-services  http  networking  internet  coding  design 
6 weeks ago by jm
RTE star Sharon Ni Bheolain stalked for six months - Independent.ie
as @Fergal says: '[this] case shows (a) the internet isn't anonymous, (b) we [ie. Ireland -jm] have laws to deal with threats and harassment'
law  ireland  harassment  internet  twitter  email  abuse  cyberstalking 
8 weeks ago by jm
Netflix packets being dropped every day because Verizon wants more money | Ars Technica
With Cogent and Verizon fighting, [peering capacity] upgrades are happening at a glacial pace, according to Schaeffer.

"Once a port hits about 85 percent throughput, you're going to begin to start to drop packets," he said. "Clearly when a port is at 120 or 130 percent [as the Cogent/Verizon ones are] the packet loss is material."

The congestion isn't only happening at peak times, he said. "These ports are so over-congested that they're running in this packet dropping state 22, 24 hours a day. Maybe at four in the morning on Tuesday or something there might be a little bit of headroom," he said.
packet-loss  networking  internet  cogent  netflix  verizon  peering 
8 weeks ago by jm
Comcast’s deal with Netflix makes network neutrality obsolete
in a world where Netflix and Yahoo connect directly to residential ISPs, every Internet company will have its own separate pipe. And policing whether different pipes are equally good is a much harder problem than requiring that all of the traffic in a single pipe be treated the same. If it wanted to ensure a level playing field, the FCC would be forced to become intimately involved in interconnection disputes, overseeing who Verizon interconnects with, how fast the connections are and how much they can charge to do it.
verizon  comcast  internet  peering  networking  netflix  network-neutrality 
8 weeks ago by jm
CJEU in #Svensson says that in general it is OK to hyperlink to protected works without permission
IPKat says 'this morning the Court of Justice of the European Union issued its keenly awaited decision in Case C-466/12 Svensson [...]: The owner of a website may, without the authorisation of the copyright holders, redirect internet users, via hyperlinks, to protected works available on a freely accessible basis on another site. This is so even if the internet users who click on the link have the impression that the work is appearing on the site that contains the link.'

This is potentially big news. Not so much for the torrent-site scenario, but for the NNI/NLI linking-to-newspaper-stories scenario.
ip  svensson  cjeu  eu  law  linking  hyperlinks  pirate-bay  internet  web  links  http  copyright 
10 weeks ago by jm
Survey results of EU teens using the internet
A lot of unsupervised use:
Just under half of children said they access the internet from their own bedroom on a daily basis with 22pc saying they do so several times a day.
surveys  eu  ireland  politics  filtering  internet  social-media  facebook  children  teens  cyber-bullying 
10 weeks ago by jm
A Linguist Explains the Grammar of Doge. Wow.
In this sense, doge really is the next generation of LOLcat, in terms of a pet-based snapshot of a certain era in internet language. We’ve kept the idea that animals speak like an exaggerated version of an internet-savvy human, but as our definitions of what it means to be a human on the internet have changed, so too have the voices that we give our animals. Wow.
via:nelson  language  linguist  doge  memes  internet  english 
10 weeks ago by jm
Capabilities of Movements and Affordances of Digital Media: Paradoxes of Empowerment | DMLcentral
Paradoxically, it’s possible that the widespread use of digital tools facilitates capabilities in some domains, such as organization, logistics, and publicity, while simultaneously engendering hindrances to [political] movement impacts on other domains, including those related to policy and electoral spheres.
society  politics  activism  tech  internet  gezi-park  tahrir-square  euromaidan  occupy 
12 weeks ago by jm
Sky parental controls break many JQuery-using websites
An 11 hour outage caused by a false positive in Sky's anti-phishing filter; all sites using the code.jquery.com CDN for JQuery would have seen errors.
Sky still appears to be blocking code.jquery.com and all files served via the site, and more worryingly is that if you try to report the incorrect category, once signing in on the Sky website you an error page. We suspect the site was blocked due to being linked to by a properly malicious website, i.e. code.jquery.com and some javascript files were being used on a dodgy website and every domain mentioned was subsequently added to a block list.


(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  sky  filtering  internet  uk  anti-phishing  phish  jquery  javascript  http  web  fps  false-positives 
12 weeks ago by jm
Chinese Internet Traffic Redirected to Small Wyoming House
'That address — which is home to some 2,000 companies on paper — was the subject of a lengthy 2011 Reuters investigation that found that among the entities registered to the address were a shell company controlled by a jailed former Ukraine prime minister; the owner of a company charged with helping online poker operators evade an Internet gambling ban; and one entity that was banned from government contracts after selling counterfeit truck parts to the Pentagon.'
china  internet  great-firewall  dns  wyoming  attacks  security  not-the-onion 
january 2014 by jm
Fuck Yeah Internet Fridge
'why the fuck does my fridge need Twitter?'
twitter  funny  tech  home  fridges  internet  web  appliances  consume 
january 2014 by jm
xelerance/xl2tpd · GitHub
IRR-recommended self-hosted VPN endpoint implementation
vpn  l2tp  tunneling  internet  privacy  security  xl2tpd  xelerance  via:irr 
december 2013 by jm
Content filtering by UK ISPs
An exhaustive list from the UK's Open Rights Group
filtering  uk  isps  org  porn  blocklists  internet 
december 2013 by jm
MP Claire Perry tells UK that worrying about filter overblocking is a "load of cock"
the bottom line appears to be "think of the children" -- in other words, any degree of overblocking is acceptable as long as children cannot access porn:

The debate and letter confuse legal, illegal and potentially harmful content, all of which require very different tactics to deal with. Without a greater commitment to evidence and rational debate, poor policy outcomes will be the likely result. There's a pattern, much the same as the Digital Economy Act, or the Snooper's Charter. Start with moral panic; dismiss evidence; legislate; and finally, watch the policy unravel, either delivering unintended harms, even to children in this case, or simply failing altogether.


See https://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/2013/talktalk-wordpress for a well-written exploration of a case of overblocking and its fallout. Talk Talk, one UK ISP, has filters which incorrectly dealt with IWF data and blocked WordPress.com's admin interface, resulting in all blogs there become unusable for their owners for over a week, with seemingly nobody able to diagnose and fix the problem competently.
filtering  overblocking  uk  politics  think-of-the-children  porn  cam  claire-perry  open-rights-group  false-positives  talk-talk  networking  internet  wordpress 
december 2013 by jm
Karlin Lillington on DRI's looming victory in the European Court of Justice
If the full European Court of Justice (ECJ) accepts the opinion of its advocate general in a final ruling due early next year – and it almost always does – it will prove a huge vindication of Ireland’s small privacy advocacy group, Digital Rights Ireland (DRI).
Its case against Irish retention laws, which began in 2006, forms the basis of this broader David v Goliath challenge and initial opinion.
The advocate general’s advice largely upholds the key concerns put forward by DRI against Ireland’s laws. Withholding so much data about every citizen, including children, in case someone commits a future crime, is too intrusive into private life, and could allow authorities to create a “faithful and exhaustive map of a large portion of a person’s [private] conduct”.
Retained data is so comprehensive that they could easily reveal private identities, which are supposed to remain anonymous. And the data, entrusted to third parties, is at too much risk of fraudulent or malicious use.
Cruz Villalón argues that there must be far greater oversight to the retention process, and controls on access to data, and that citizens should have the right to be notified after the fact if their data has been scrutinised. The Irish Government had repeatedly waved off such concerns from Digital Rights Ireland in the past.
dri  rights  ireland  internet  surveillance  data-retention  privacy  eu  ecj  law 
december 2013 by jm
Same Old Stories From Sean Sherlock
Sherlock’s record is spotty at best when it comes to engagement. Setting aside the 80,680 people who were ignored by the minister, he was hostile and counter productive to debate from the beginning, going so far as to threaten to pull out of a public debate because a campaigner against the ['Irish SOPA'] SI would be in attendance. His habit of blocking people online who publicly ask him tough yet legitimate questions has earned him the nickname “Sherblock”.
sean-sherlock  sherblock  labour  ireland  politics  blocking  filtering  internet  freedom  copyright  emi  music  law  piracy  debate  twitter 
december 2013 by jm
The New Threat: Targeted Internet Traffic Misdirection
MITM attacks via BGP route hijacking now relatively commonplace on the internet, with 60 cases observed so far this year by Renesys
bgp  mitm  internet  security  routing  attacks  hijacking 
november 2013 by jm
An Empirical Evaluation of TCP Performance in Online Games
In this paper, we have analyzed the performance of TCP in of ShenZhou Online, a commercial, mid-sized MMORPG. Our study indicates that, though TCP is full-fledged and robust, simply transmitting game data over TCP could cause unexpected performance problems. This is due to the following distinctive characteristics of game traffic: 1) tiny packets, 2) low packet rate, 3) application-limited traffic generation, and 4) bi-directional traffic.

We have shown that because TCP was originally designed for unidirectional and network-limited bulk data transfers, it cannot adapt well to MMORPG traffic. In particular, the window-based congestion control mechanism and the fast retransmit algorithm for loss recovery are ineffective. This suggests that the selective acknowledgement option should be enabled whenever TCP is used, as it significantly enhances the loss recovery process. Furthermore, TCP is overkill, as not every game packet needs to be transmitted reliably and processed in an orderly manner. We have also shown that the degraded network performance did impact users' willingness to continue a game. Finally, a number of design guidelines have been proposed by exploiting the unique characteristics of game traffic.


via Nelson
tcp  games  udp  protocols  networking  internet  mmos  retransmit  mmorpgs 
november 2013 by jm
High Performance Browser Networking
slides from Ilya Grigorik's tutorial on the topic at O'Reilly's Velocity conference. lots of good data and tips for internet protocol optimization
slides  presentations  ilya-grigorik  performance  http  https  tcp  tutorials  networking  internet 
november 2013 by jm
It’s time for Silicon Valley to ask: Is it worth it?
These companies and their technologies are built on data, and the data is us. If we are to have any faith in the Internet, we have to trust them to protect it. That’s a relationship dynamic that will become only more intertwined as the Internet finds its way into more aspects of our daily existences, from phones that talk to us to cars that drive themselves.

The US’s surveillance programs threaten to destroy that trust permanently.

America’s tech companies must stand up to this pervasive and corrosive surveillance system. They must ask that difficult question: “Is it worth it?”
silicon-valley  tech  nsa  gchq  spying  surveillance  internet  privacy  data-protection 
november 2013 by jm
Bruce Schneier On The Feudal Internet And How To Fight It
This is very well-put.
In its early days, there was a lot of talk about the "natural laws of the Internet" and how it would empower the masses, upend traditional power blocks, and spread freedom throughout the world. The international nature of the Internet made a mockery of national laws. Anonymity was easy. Censorship was impossible. Police were clueless about cybercrime. And bigger changes were inevitable. Digital cash would undermine national sovereignty. Citizen journalism would undermine the media, corporate PR, and political parties. Easy copying would destroy the traditional movie and music industries. Web marketing would allow even the smallest companies to compete against corporate giants. It really would be a new world order.
Unfortunately, as we know, that's not how it worked out. Instead, we have seen the rise of the feudal Internet:
Feudal security consolidates power in the hands of the few. These companies [like Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook etc.] act in their own self-interest. They use their relationship with us to increase their profits, sometimes at our expense. They act arbitrarily. They make mistakes. They're deliberately changing social norms. Medieval feudalism gave the lords vast powers over the landless peasants; we’re seeing the same thing on the Internet.
bruce-schneier  politics  internet  feudal-internet  google  apple  microsoft  facebook  government 
october 2013 by jm
Necessary and Proportionate -- In Which Civil Society is Caught Between a Cop and a Spy
Modern telecommunications technology implied the development of modern telecommunications surveillance, because it moved the scope of action from the physical world (where intelligence, generally seen as part of the military mission, had acted) to the virtual world—including the scope of those actions that could threaten state power. While the public line may have been, as US Secretary of State Henry Stimson said in 1929, “gentlemen do not open each other’s mail”, you can bet that they always did keep a keen eye on the comings and goings of each other’s shipping traffic.

The real reason that surveillance in the context of state intelligence was limited until recently was because it was too expensive, and it was too expensive for everyone. The Westphalian compromise demands equality of agency as tied to territory. As soon as one side gains a significant advantage, the structure of sovereignty itself is threatened at a conceptual level — hence Oppenheimer as the death of any hope of international rule of law. Once surveillance became cheap enough, all states were (and will increasingly be) forced to attempt it at scale, as a reaction to this pernicious efficiency. The US may be ahead of the game now, but Moore’s law and productization will work their magic here.
government  telecoms  snooping  gchq  nsa  surveillance  law  politics  intelligence  spying  internet 
september 2013 by jm
Blocking The Pirate Bay appears to have 'no lasting net impact' on illegal downloading
In the fight against the unauthorised sharing of copyright protected material, aka piracy, Dutch Internet Service
Providers have been summoned by courts to block their subscribers’ access to The Pirate Bay (TPB) and related
sites. This paper studies the effectiveness of this approach towards online copyright enforcement, using both a
consumer survey and a newly developed non-infringing technology for BitTorrent monitoring. While a small
group of respondents download less from illegal sources or claim to have stopped, and a small but significant
effect is found on the distribution of Dutch peers, no lasting net impact is found on the percentage of the Dutch
population downloading from illegal sources.
fail  blocking  holland  pirate-bay  tpb  papers  via:tjmcintyre  internet  isps 
september 2013 by jm
Why wireless mesh networks won't save us from censorship
I'm not saying mesh networks don't work ever; the people in the wireless mesh community I've met are all great people doing fantastic work. What I am saying is that unplanned wireless mesh networks never work at scale. I think it's a great problem to think about, but in terms of actual allocation of time and resources I think there are other, more fruitful avenues of action to fight Internet censorship.


(via Kragen)
wireless  censorship  internet  networking  mesh  mesh-networks  organisation  scaling  wifi 
august 2013 by jm
IrelandOffline broadband availability map
Marking the locations of broadband options in your area, along with VDSL cabinets, local exchanges, and wireless ISP coverage, and the landing sites of submarine cables (presumably from submarinecablemap.com data)
irelandoffline  cables  network  internet  ireland  coverage  wisps  vdsl  broadband 
august 2013 by jm
Python Infrastructure Status - SSL Verification Errors on PyPI
There appears to be a problem affecting a number of users where SSL verification errors will be shown saying "pypi.python.org" does not match "addvocate.com". As Best we can tell this appears to be related to the ISP. It seems to be affecting folks using O2 or O2 related companies. We've also reports of it affecting people using Free.

Cause appears to be one of the IP addresses returned in the Geo DNS for Europe returning a certificate for addvocate.com. It's not clear at this time *why* that IP address is returning a certificate for addvocate.com.

Turned out to be a routing loop in the fast.ly London POP (via Mick Twomey)
via:micktwomey  o2  censorship  filtering  internet  ssl  tls  pypi  python  geodns  pki 
july 2013 by jm
ISPAI Responds to Porn Filtering Debacle
Quite a strong statement:
The issue of access to age-inappropriate content is not a new matter and it is important not to have “knee-jerk” reactions which don’t solve the perceived problem and have major implications for the public’s right to access information in general. Notably the European Commission, as stated by vice-president Nellie Kroes [jm: sic], has come out strongly against blocking of the Internet, seeing it as an important platform for freedom of speech and she intends to “guarantee access without restriction.”  We in Ireland would do well to consider carefully the impact that any rash adoption or attempted copying of UK measures might have here in the light of current and future EU legislation and policy.
ispai  filtering  overblocking  david-cameron  porn  internet  ireland  politics  blocking  web  uk 
july 2013 by jm
Irish Comms Minister Pat Rabbitte ignores calls for State role in blocking online porn
Good call.
Mr Rabbitte says that legal concerns attached to mandatory filters, as well as a fear of imposing censorship, have persuaded him against trying to force ISPs to impose mandatory pornography-blocking internet filters. "I remain to be convinced that blanket censorship or a default-on blocker is the correct or workable response," he said. "Even if it were possible to ensure that such measures were not easily circumvented or didn't inadvertently block perfectly acceptable content, the principled question of whether the State should be encouraging service providers to filter or block content to all users, regardless of whether there are children resident, would still arise."
pat-rabbitte  internet  filtering  censorship  blocking  porn  overblocking  default-on  isps  ireland 
july 2013 by jm
UK Internet censorship plan no less stupid than it was last year - Boing Boing
Cory Doctorow's long list of articles describing how the UK's censorware-for-all plan is going to fail. I like this bit:
When we argued our case to the vendor's representative, he was categorical: any nudity, anywhere on [Boing Boing], makes it into a "nudity site" for the purposes of blocking. The vendor went so far as to state that a single image of Michelangelo's David, on one page among hundreds of thousands on a site, would be sufficient grounds for a nudity classification. I suspect that none of the censorship advocates in the Lords understand that the offshore commercial operators they're proposing to put in charge of the nation's information access apply this kind of homeopathic standard to objectionable material.


I guess this means the Daily Mail will be similarly classified as containing "nudity" and blocked, given their smut column on every page?
daily-mail  fail  censorship  censorware  boing-boing  michelangelo  sculpture  nudity  uk  politics  filtering  overblocking  web  internet 
july 2013 by jm
Improved HTTPS Performance with Early SSL Termination
This is a neat hack. Since SSL/TLS connection establishment requires lots of consecutive round trips before the connection is ready, by performing that closer to the user and reusing an existing region-to-region connection behind the scenes, the overall latency is greatly improved. Works for HTTP as well
http  https  ssl  architecture  aws  ec2  performance  latency  internet  round-trip  nginx  tls 
july 2013 by jm
Traditional AQM is not enough!
Jim Gettys on modern web design, HTTP, buffering, and FIFO queues in the network.
Web surfing is putting impulses of packets, without congestion avoidance, into FIFO queues where they do severe collateral damage to anything sharing the link (including itself!). So today’s web behavior incurs huge collateral damage on itself, data centers, the edge of the network, and in particular any application that hopes to have real time behavior. How do we solve this problem?


tl;dr: fq_codel. Now I want it!
buffering  networking  internet  web  http  protocols  tcp  bufferbloat  jim-gettys  codel  fq_codel 
july 2013 by jm
How The Copyright Industry Pushed For Internet Surveillance | TorrentFreak
Rick Falkvinge with a good point:
The reason for the copyright industry to push for surveillance is simple: any digital communications channel can be used for private conversation, but it can also be used to share culture and knowledge that is under copyright monopoly. In order to tell which communications is which, you must sort all of it – and to do that, you must look at all of it. In other words, if enforcing the copyright monopoly is your priority, you need to kill privacy, and specifically anonymity and secrecy of correspondence.


This was exactly my biggest worry -- a side-effect of effective copyright filtering is the creation of infrastructure for online oppression by the state.
copyright  privacy  state  data-protection  rick-falkvinge  copyfight  internet  filtering  surveillance  anonymity 
july 2013 by jm
_Measuring Mobile Web Performance_ [slides]
Notable slide is #13, displaying a graph of HSDPA packet RTTs measured from a train. Max RTT gets up to 20,266ms. ouch
rtt  packets  latency  hsdpa  mobile  internet  trains  packet-loss 
june 2013 by jm
Liberty issues claim against British Intelligence Services over PRISM and Tempora privacy scandal
James Welch, Legal Director for Liberty, said:
 
“Those demanding the Snoopers’ Charter seem to have been indulging in out-of-control snooping even without it – exploiting legal loopholes and help from Uncle Sam.
“No-one suggests a completely unpoliced internet but those in power cannot swap targeted investigations for endless monitoring of the entire globe.”


Go Liberty! Take note, ICCL, this is how a civil liberties group engages with internet issues.
prism  nsa  gchq  surveillance  liberty  civil-liberties  internet  snooping 
june 2013 by jm
Skype's principal architect explains why they no longer have end-to-end crypto
Mobile devices can't handle the CPU and constantly-online requirements, and an increased reliance on dedicated routing supernodes to avoid Windows-client monoculture and p2p network fragility

(via the IP list, via kragen)
skype  p2p  mobile  architecture  networking  internet  snooping  crypto  via:ip  via:kragen  phones  windows 
june 2013 by jm
SSL/TLS overhead
'The TLS handshake has multiple variations, but let’s pick the most common one – anonymous client and authenticated server (the connections browsers use most of the time).' Works out to 4 packets, in addition to the TCP handshake's 3, and about 6.5k bytes on average.
network  tls  ssl  performance  latency  speed  networking  internet  security  packets  tcp  handshake 
june 2013 by jm
Schneier on Security: Blowback from the NSA Surveillance
Unintended consequences on US-focused governance of the internet and cloud computing:
Writing about the new Internet nationalism, I talked about the ITU meeting in Dubai last fall, and the attempt of some countries to wrest control of the Internet from the US. That movement just got a huge PR boost. Now, when countries like Russia and Iran say the US is simply too untrustworthy to manage the Internet, no one will be able to argue. We can't fight for Internet freedom around the world, then turn around and destroy it back home. Even if we don't see the contradiction, the rest of the world does.
internet  freedom  cloud-computing  amazon  google  hosting  usa  us-politics  prism  nsa  surveillance 
june 2013 by jm
Music firms secure orders blocking access to Pirate Bay - Crime & Law News from Ireland & Abroad | The Irish Times - Wed, Jun 12, 2013
Four major music companies have secured court orders requiring six internet service providers to block access by subscribers to various Pirate Bay websites within some 30 days in a bid to prevent illegal downloading of copyright music and other material. [...]

Today, Mr Justice Brian McGovern said he was satisfied to make the order in circumstances including that new copyright laws here and in the EU permitted such orders to be made. He said he fully agreed with a previous High Court judge who had said he would make such blocking orders if the law permitted and noted the law now allowed for such orders. The form of the orders means the music companies will not have to make fresh applications to court if Pirate Bay changes its location on the internet.
pirate-bay  blocking  filtering  internet  ireland  upc  eircom  vodafone  digiweb  three  imagine  o2  copyright 
june 2013 by jm
Low-latency stock trading "jumps the gun" due to default NTP configuration settings
On June 3, 2013, trading in SPY exploded at 09:59:59.985, which is 15 milliseconds before the ISM's Manufacturing number released at 10:00:00. Activity in the eMini (traded in Chicago), exploded at 09:59:59.992, which is 8 milliseconds before the news release, but 7 milliseconds after SPY. Note how SPY and the eMini traded within a millisecond for the Consumer Confidence release last week, but the eMini lagged SPY by about 7 milliseconds for the ISM Manufacturing release. The simultaneous trading on Consumer Confidence is because that number is released at the same time in both NYC and Chicago.

The ISM Manufacturing number is probably released on a low latency feed in NYC, and then takes 5-7 milliseconds, due to the speed of light, to reach Chicago. Either the clock used to release the ISM number was 15 milliseconds fast, or someone (correctly) jumped the gun.

Update: [...] The clock used to release the ISM was indeed, 15 milliseconds fast. This could be from using the default setting of many NTP clients, which allows the clock to drift up to about 16 milliseconds before adjusting time.
ntp  time  synchronization  spy  trading  stocks  low-latency  clocks  internet 
june 2013 by jm
Communication costs in real-world networks
Peter Bailis has generated some good real-world data about network performance and latency, measured using EC2 instances, between ec2 regions, between zones, and between hosts in a single AZ. good data (particularly as I was looking for this data in a public source not too long ago).

I wasn’t aware of any datasets describing network behavior both within and across datacenters, so we launched m1.small Amazon EC2 instances in each of the eight geo-distributed “Regions,” across the three us-east “Availability Zones” (three co-located datacenters in Virginia), and within one datacenter (us-east-b). We measured RTTs between hosts for a week at a granularity of one ping per second.


Some of the high-percentile measurements are undoubtedly impact of host and VM behaviour, but that is still good data for a typical service built in EC2.
networks  performance  measurements  benchmarks  ops  ec2  networking  internet  az  latency 
may 2013 by jm
Did Conroy’s AFP filter wrongly block 1,200 sites?
Looks like many Aussie network operators were legally required to block 1,200 websites (presumably, one target and 1199 false positives), in secret.

Quoting http://lists.ausnog.net/pipermail/ausnog/2013-April/017993.html : "You get a notice to
block. You block or either get fined, go to jail or lose your carrier
licence. It is a blunt instrument and it is a condition of being at 'the
big boys table' i.e. you're a carrier or a carriage service provider."
australia  law  afp  filtering  internet  blocking  censorship  secret  eff 
may 2013 by jm
Rob "b3ta" Manuel in Dublin next week
The Bottom Half Of The Internet -- "Racism; typos; filth; spam; ignorance; rage – that's all the bottom half of the internet is good for, right? Rob Manuel wants you to question the internet dictum, most beloved of high-profile columnists, that you should ignore all of the comments all of the time. The 'war on comments', he reckons, might just be an echo of a fourth estate that's having trouble adjusting to the idea of an unwashed public disagreeing with their sacred opinions. Sous les pavés, la plage."

On Tuesday, le cool Dublin & Pilcrow present SPIEL. Rob Manuel is the flashy animator behind B3ta and he's joined by Ed Melvin, who wants to educate you on 'The Unreal Engines' of virtual currencies and economies.
rob-manuel  b3ta  dublin  comments  internet  meetings  talks  lecool 
april 2013 by jm
Spamhaus victim of BGP route hijacking
Pretty major hi-jinks. Neil Schwartzman says it didn't go on for long, but still, this is crazy antics.

As can seen from the BGP output, we were using a /32 route going over AS 34109. This was highly suspicious for two reasons. First, a /32 route refers only to a single IP address. Except in special cases, routes are normally /24 (256 hosts) or larger. Second, the AS 34109 belongs to CB3ROB which is an Internet provider that has actually been in conflict with Spamhaus (see: spamhaus; allspammedup; theregister). Certainly they weren’t running a legitimate Spamhaus server. It seems clear that the CB3ROB network hijacked one (or more) of the IP addresses of Spamhaus, and installed a DNS server there which incorrectly returns positive results to every query. The result causes harm to Spamhaus users and their customers, making Spamhaus unusable for anyone unable to correct the problem as we did, and perhaps even undermining the credibility of Spamhaus itself.
spamhaus  security  bgp  peering  internet  routing  hacking  dns  dnsbls  cb3rob  as-34109 
march 2013 by jm
One of CloudFlare's upstream providers on the "death of the internet" scare-mongering
Having a bad day on the Internet is nothing new. These are the types
of events we deal with on a regular basis, and most large network
operators are very good at responding quickly to deal with situations like
this. In our case, we worked with Cloudflare to quickly identify the
attack profile, rolled out global filters on our network to limit the
attack traffic without adversely impacting legitimate users, and worked
with our other partner networks (like NTT) to do the same. If the attacks
had stopped here, nobody in the "mainstream media" would have noticed, and
it would have been just another fun day for a few geeks on the Internet.

The next part is where things got interesting, and is the part that nobody
outside of extremely technical circles has actually bothered to try and
understand yet. After attacking Cloudflare and their upstream Internet
providers directly stopped having the desired effect, the attackers turned
to any other interconnection point they could find, and stumbled upon
Internet Exchange Points like LINX (in London), AMS-IX (in Amsterdam), and
DEC-IX (in Frankfurt), three of the largest IXPs in the world. An IXP is
an "interconnection fabric", or essentially just a large switched LAN,
which acts as a common meeting point for different networks to connect and
exchange traffic with each other. One downside to the way this
architecture works is that there is a single big IP block used at each of
these IXPs, where every network who interconnects is given 1 IP address,
and this IP block CAN be globally routable. When the attackers stumbled
upon this, probably by accident, it resulted in a lot of bogus traffic
being injected into the IXP fabrics in an unusual way, until the IXP
operators were able to work with everyone to make certain the IXP IP
blocks weren't being globally re-advertised.

Note that the vast majority of global Internet traffic does NOT travel
over IXPs, but rather goes via direct private interconnections between
specific networks. The IXP traffic represents more of the "long tail" of
Internet traffic exchange, a larger number of smaller networks, which
collectively still adds up to be a pretty big chunk of traffic. So, what
you actually saw in this attack was a larger number of smaller networks
being affected by something which was an completely unrelated and
unintended side-effect of the actual attacks, and thus *poof* you have the
recipe for a lot of people talking about it. :)

Hopefully that clears up a bit of the situation.
bandwidth  internet  gizmodo  traffic  cloudflare  ddos  hacking 
march 2013 by jm
Opinion: The Internet is a surveillance state
Bruce Schneier op-ed on CNN.com.
So, we're done. Welcome to a world where Google knows exactly what sort of porn you all like, and more about your interests than your spouse does. Welcome to a world where your cell phone company knows exactly where you are all the time. Welcome to the end of private conversations, because increasingly your conversations are conducted by e-mail, text, or social networking sites.
And welcome to a world where all of this, and everything else that you do or is done on a computer, is saved, correlated, studied, passed around from company to company without your knowledge or consent; and where the government accesses it at will without a warrant.
Welcome to an Internet without privacy, and we've ended up here with hardly a fight.
freedom  surveillance  legal  privacy  internet  bruce-schneier  web  google  facebook 
march 2013 by jm
Fox DMCA Takedowns Order Google to Remove Fox DMCA Takedowns
Chilling Effects is setup to stop the ‘chilling effects’ of Internet censorship. Google sees this as a good thing and sends takedown requests it receives to be added to the database. Fox sends takedown requests to Google for pages which the company says contain links to material it holds the copyright to. Those pages include those on Chilling Effects which show which links Fox wants taken down. Google delists the Chilling Effects pages from its search engine, thus completing the circle and defeating the very reason Chilling Effects was set up for in the first place.
chilling-effects  copyright  internet  legal  dmca  google  law 
january 2013 by jm
Meeting A Troll...
This is a must-read. One journalist's experience of constant online harassment by an antisemitic internet troll, and their eventual unmasking.
internet  trolling  harassment  trolls  antisemitism  stories  twitter 
september 2012 by jm
CEO Of Internet Provider Sonic.net: We Delete User Logs After Two Weeks. Your Internet Provider Should, Too. - Forbes
"what we saw was a shift towards customers being made part of a business model that involved–I don’t know if extortion is the right word–but embarassment for gain. An individual would download a movie, using bittorrent, and infringe copyright. And that might be our customer, like Bob Smith who owns a Sonic.net account, or it might be their spouse, or it might be their child. Or it might be one of his three roommates in a loft in San Francisco, who Bob is not responsible for, and who rent out their loft on AirBnB and have couch surfers and buddies from college and so on and open Wifi.

When lawyers asked us for these users’ information, some of our customers I spoke with said “Oh yeah, crap, they caught me,” and were willing to admit they engaged in piracy and pay a settlement. But in other cases, it turned out the roommate did it, or no one would admit to doing it. But they would pay the settlement anyway. Because no one wants to be named in the public record in a case from So-And-So Productions vs. 1,600 names including Bob Smith for downloading a film called “Don’t Tell My Wife I B—F—— The Babysitter.”

AG: Is that a real title?

DJ: Yes. I’ve read about cases where a lawyer was doing this for the movie “The Expendables,” and 5% of people settled. So then he switched to representing someone with an embarassing porn title, and like 30% of people paid.

It seemed like half the time, the customer wasn’t the one right one, but they rolled over because it would be very embarassing. And I think that’s an abuse of process. I was unwilling to become part of that business model. In many cases the lawyers never pursued the case, and it was all bluster. But under that threat, you pay."
interview  isps  freedom  copyright  internet  shakedown  lawyers  sonic.net  data-retention  via:oisin 
june 2012 by jm
Issue of web access raises hackles at conference - The Irish Times - Tue, Jun 19, 2012
'Prof Michael O’Flaherty, the vice-chairman of the UN Human Rights Committee, told the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) conference on internet freedom that the rights of copyright holders to make a living had to be balanced with the right to freedom of expression.' 'THE PUNISHMENT for breakers of the “three strikes” illegal download rule was “exceptionally disproportionate” [...] The internet was a vehicle for a wide range of human rights so excluding someone from it was an “extraordinary penalty”.'
osce  coverage  unhrc  conferences  dublin  copyright  freedom  internet  censorship  filtering 
june 2012 by jm
Jamming Tripoli: Inside Moammar Gadhafi's Secret Surveillance Network
The very scary future of state control, censorship, and totalitarianism in the age of the internet. A presentation from Amesys, a subsidiary of Bull S.A. "explained the significance of Eagle to a government seeking to control activities inside its borders. Warning of an “increasing need of high-level intelligence in the constant struggle against criminals and terrorism,” the document touted Eagle’s ability to capture bulk Internet traffic passing through conventional, satellite, and mobile phone networks, and then to store that data in a filterable and searchable database. This database, in turn, could be integrated with other sources of intelligence, such as phone recordings, allowing security personnel to pick through audio and data from a given person all at once, in real time or by historical time stamp. In other words, instead of choosing targets and monitoring them, officials could simply sweep up everything, sort it by time and target, and then browse through it later at their leisure. The title of the presentation -- ”From Lawful to Massive Interception” -- gestured at the vast difference between so-called lawful intercept (traditional law enforcement surveillance based on warrants for specific phone numbers or IP addresses) and what Amesys was offering."
massive-interception  future  state-control  censorship  privacy  internet  email  totalitarianism  libya  amesys  bull-sa  gadhafi  surveillance 
may 2012 by jm
First Music Contact - Music3.0
'We talk a lot about what the world of music and artists will look like five or ten years from now. But for changes to happen then, the conversations need to happen now. We believe that the next big thing in music is not going to ever appear on a stage. After the record industry (music 1.0) and the live music industry (music 2.0), it's time to pay more attention to innovation (music 3.0) and what can come from constructively disrupting how the music industry operates.

It's time to open up the shop. It's time for unvested interests to see if they can use existing data and ecosystems to make a better music business. For far too long, music has been a conservative sector which views the influence of outside forces with abject suspicion and rank horror. Chalk this down to some bad experiences over the last 15 years due to misunderstandings with and ignorance of the tech and telecoms worlds. Chalk this down to rampant music industry egos which lead folks to believe no-one else can sell music bar music players. Chalk it down to fear of disruption.

So, it's time for change. You can't keep doing the same things in the same way and hope you won't make the same mistakes again. It's time to listen to and learn from smart people in other areas. It's time for people who have innovative ideas or even just the stirrings of innovative ideas to take stock from people who operate in other areas and who deal with ideas, technology and the valuable currency of innovation every single working day. It's time for some different talking which is going to lead to some very different make-and-do experiences.'

Looks excellent. (via Jim Carroll)
music  future  technology  internet  disruption  music-industry  ireland  via:jimcarroll 
april 2012 by jm
Senator Mark McSharry call Boards.ie and Politics.ie "subversive"
'we have Boards.ie and Politics.ie, for me frankly that doesn't amount to free speech what it amounts to is legalised subversion of the state. I think it's fundamentally wrong.' Incredible quote
boards  politics.ie  ireland  internet  seanad  regulation  subversion  mark-mcsharry  free-speech 
march 2012 by jm
Danish Police Censor Google, Facebook and 8,000 Other Sites by Accident | TorrentFreak
'Lundberg said that his organization was sorry for the mistake and has now adopted a new system whereby blocked sites have to now be approved by two employees instead of one, although why that was not the case already for such a serious process is up for debate. The other question is how at the flick of a switch do 8,000 sites suddenly get added to a blacklist – for whatever reason – without any kind of oversight. Denmark’s IT-Political Association is critical and has called for ISPs to cease cooperation with the voluntary scheme which operates without any kind of judicial review. “Today’s story shows that the police are not able to secure against manual errors that could escalate into something that actually works as a ‘kill switch’ for the Internet,” the group said in a statement.'
censorship  denmark  internet  filtering  review  google  facebook  blocking 
march 2012 by jm
Censorship is inseparable from surveillance | Technology | guardian.co.uk
'In order to stop you from visiting www.jamesjoycesulysses.com, the national censorwall must intercept all your outgoing internet requests and examine them to determine whether they are for the banned website. That's the difference between the old days of censorship and our new digital censorship world. Today, censorship is inseparable from surveillance.' Very good point from Cory Doctorow
cory-doctorow  censorship  surveillance  firewalls  privacy  internet  freedom 
march 2012 by jm
Verisign seizes .com domain registered via foreign Registrar on behalf of US Authorities.
'at the end of the day what has happened is that US law (in fact, Maryland state law) as been imposed on a .com domain [specifically gambling site bodog.com] operating outside the USA, which is the subtext we were very worried about when we commented on SOPA. Even though SOPA is currently in limbo, the reality that US law can now be asserted over all domains registered under .com, .net, org, .biz and maybe .info (Afilias is headquartered in Ireland by operates out of the US). This is no longer a doom-and-gloom theory by some guy in a tin foil hat. It just happened.'
via:joshea  internet  legal  policy  public  sopa  domains  dns  verisign  seizure 
february 2012 by jm
Neil Young on piracy
'I look at the internet as the new radio. I look at the radio as gone. [...] Piracy is the new radio. That’s how music gets around.'
internet  filesharing  piracy  copyright  neil-young  music 
february 2012 by jm
Adrian Weckler confims that "Ireland's SOPA" will be vague and open-ended
'The clear implication from [Adrian's] interview with Sean Sherlock is that the proposed measures will be lacking in any real detail, leaving it entirely up to the judges as to what types of blocking might emerge. (Possibly going beyond web blocking to also target hosting and other services.) This ambiguity -- as well as jeopardising fundamental rights -- will create intolerable uncertainty for businesses such as Google who might find themselves at risk of business threatening and unpredictable injunctions and will certainly deter others from setting up in Ireland.' -- this is much, much worse than I thought, particularly given the level of technical knowledge among Ireland's judges (if Mr. Justice Charleton's performance in EMI v. UPC is anything to go by).
sopa  ireland  law  filesharing  piracy  internet  filtering  blocking 
january 2012 by jm
Project HGG: FAQ
Hackerspace Global Grid -- 'We want to understand, build and make available satellite based communication for the hackerspace community and all of mankind.' Space is the place!
space  ccc  satellite  communication  internet  hackerspace 
january 2012 by jm
Punching through The Great Firewall of T-Mobile
well, this is bizarre -- it seems T-Mobile UK are blocking encrypted email submission and OpenVPN traffic in their mobile internet access products. Why? Who knows -- but at least filtering RST packets evades the block, as in the Great Firewall of China
china  filtering  rst  internet  iptables  t-mobile  uk  payg  mobile-internet 
january 2012 by jm
French President’s Residence ‘Busted’ For BitTorrent Piracy | TorrentFreak
'According to data from YouHaveDownloaded.com, a range of downloads have been actioned from the Palace including a cam copy of Tower Heist, a telesync copy of Arthur Christmas, and music from The Beach Boys.' I love this. The data is, of course, filled with potential inaccuracies -- and that's the point
bittorrent  surveillance  downloading  internet  privacy  france  hadopi 
december 2011 by jm
Netflix Beats BitTorrent’s Bandwidth
'For perhaps the first time in the internet’s history, the largest percentage of the net’s traffic is content that is paid for.' A great demo of how *good*, legit, for-pay services, can beat out less usable, dodgy, but free ones (via Waxy)
via:waxy  piracy  bandwidth  bittorrent  internet  netflix  filesharing 
may 2011 by jm
Online censorship now bordering on the ridiculous in Turkey - Reporters Without Borders
'access to websites containing words on the list would in theory be suspended and it would be impossible to create new ones containing them. However, it is not clear how and to what extent the directive will be implemented in practice. The TIB could decide to suppress or block pages for just one blacklisted word. ... The list, which borders on the ridiculous, includes words such as “etek” (skirt), “baldiz” (sister-in-law) and “hayvan” (animals). It poses serious problems for access to online information. If words such as “free” and “pic” are censored, countless references to freedom and everyday photos will be eliminated from the Turkish Internet.' Incredible (via Danny)
via:mala  repression  internet  turkey  censorship  filtering  false-positives 
april 2011 by jm
Daragh O'Brien on the Gardai's plans to force ISPs to implement IP filtering
'Internet blocking is ineffective. The current proposal lacks sufficient checks and balances, and may even require ISPs and telcos to break other laws to comply. It will inevitably result in innocents being tarred as offenders. Data Protection principles (such as “Adequate, Relevant, and Not Excessive” are being blatantly ignored to implement an ineffective solution. Far better is to shut down the shop by removing the images at source and invest time, energy, and resources into a more transparent effort to manage this issue.' well said
internet  filtering  censorship  blocking  gardai  isps  ireland  data-protection  privacy  from delicious
march 2011 by jm
Ireland’s new coalition on media, IT & IP law | Lex Ferenda
'some first thoughts on how the just-published coalition agreement (Fine Gael and Labour) in Ireland proposes to deal with issues of interest to cyberlaw and media law.'
lex-ferenda  law  ireland  ip  content  internet  fair-use  copyright  tv  from delicious
march 2011 by jm
TechWire: Don't do it, Enda and Eamon
Adrian Weckler with a plea for the incoming govt regarding the attempt to rush through '3 Strikes' by the outgoing one: 'Such a law will have absolutely no effect on the practice of illegal filesharing. None. Zero. It hasn't worked in France. It hasn't worked in Britain. And it certainly won't work in Ireland. On the other hand, it may well send a signal to huge, jobs-creating digital IT companies that Ireland is a place that tries to legislate away personal digital freedoms.'
3-strikes  ireland  adrian-weckler  politics  filesharing  piracy  filtering  internet  freedom  from delicious
march 2011 by jm
U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites, ‘By Mistake’ | TorrentFreak
DHS/ICE domain seizures suffer a serious false positive problem, resulting in the seizure and shutting down of 84,000 subdomains of a free DNS provider, replacing them with a banner accusing the site of trafficking in child porn. whoops!
dhs  ice  censorship  internet  domains  dns  seizure  false-positives  child-porn  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
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