jm + innodb   4

Good advice on running large-scale database stress tests
I've been bitten by poor key distribution in tests in the past, so this is spot on: 'I'd run it with Zipfian, Pareto, and Dirac delta distributions, and I'd choose read-modify-write transactions.'

And of course, a dataset bigger than all combined RAM.

Also: http://smalldatum.blogspot.ie/2014/04/biebermarks.html -- the "Biebermark", where just a single row out of the entire db is contended on in a read/modify/write transaction: "the inspiration for this is maintaining counts for [highly contended] popular entities like Justin Bieber and One Direction."
biebermark  benchmarks  testing  performance  stress-tests  databases  storage  mongodb  innodb  foundationdb  aphyr  measurement  distributions  keys  zipfian 
december 2014 by jm
If Eventual Consistency Seems Hard, Wait Till You Try MVCC
ex-Percona MySQL wizard Baron Schwartz, noting that MVCC as implemented in common SQL databases is not all that simple or reliable compared to big bad NoSQL Eventual Consistency:
Since I am not ready to assert that there’s a distributed system I know to be better and simpler than eventually consistent datastores, and since I certainly know that InnoDB’s MVCC implementation is full of complexities, for right now I am probably in the same position most of my readers are: the two viable choices seem to be single-node MVCC and multi-node eventual consistency. And I don’t think MVCC is the simpler paradigm of the two.
nosql  concurrency  databases  mysql  riak  voldemort  eventual-consistency  reliability  storage  baron-schwartz  mvcc  innodb  postgresql 
december 2014 by jm
Google swaps out MySQL, moves to MariaDB
When we asked Sallner to quantify the scale of the migration he said, "They're moving it all. Everything they have. All of the MySQL servers are moving to MariaDB, as far as I understand."

By moving to MariaDB, Google can free itself of any dependence on technology dictated by Oracle – a company whose motivations are unclear, and whose track record for working with the wider technology community is dicey, to say the least. Oracle has controlled MySQL since its acquisition of Sun in 2010, and the key InnoDB storage engine since it got ahold of Innobase in 2005.

[...] We asked Cole why Google would shift from MySQL to MariaDB, and what the key technical differences between the systems were. "From my perspective, they're more or less equivalent other than if you look at specific features and how they implement them," Cole said, speaking in a personal capacity and not on behalf of Google. "Ideologically there are lots of differences."


So -- AWS, when will RDS offer MariaDB as an option?
google  mysql  mariadb  sql  open-source  licensing  databases  storage  innodb  oracle 
september 2013 by jm

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