jm + injection   3

muxy
a proxy that mucks with your system and application context, operating at Layers 4 and 7, allowing you to simulate common failure scenarios from the perspective of an application under test; such as an API or a web application. If you are building a distributed system, Muxy can help you test your resilience and fault tolerance patterns.
proxy  distributed  testing  web  http  fault-tolerance  failure  injection  tcp  delay  resilience  error-handling 
september 2015 by jm
Byteman
a tool which simplifies tracing and testing of Java programs. Byteman allows you to insert extra Java code into your application, either as it is loaded during JVM startup or even after it has already started running. The injected code is allowed to access any of your data and call any application methods, including where they are private. You can inject code almost anywhere you want and there is no need to prepare the original source code in advance nor do you have to recompile, repackage or redeploy your application. In fact you can remove injected code and reinstall different code while the application continues to execute. The simplest use of Byteman is to install code which traces what your application is doing. This can be used for monitoring or debugging live deployments as well as for instrumenting code under test so that you can be sure it has operated correctly. By injecting code at very specific locations you can avoid the overheads which often arise when you switch on debug or product trace. Also, you decide what to trace when you run your application rather than when you write it so you don't need 100% hindsight to be able to obtain the information you need.
tracing  java  byteman  injection  jvm  ops  debugging  testing 
september 2015 by jm
Comcast Wi-Fi serving self-promotional ads via JavaScript injection | Ars Technica
Comcast is adding data into the broadband packet stream. In 2007, it was packets serving up disconnection commands. Today, Comcast is inserting JavaScript that is serving up advertisements, according to [Robb] Topolski, who reviewed Singel's data. "It's the duty of the service provider to pull packets without treating them or modifying them or injecting stuff or forging packets. None of that should be in the province of the service provider," he said. "Imagine every Web page with a Comcast bug in the lower righthand corner. It's the antithesis of what a service provider is supposed to do. We want Internet access, not another version of cable TV."


The company appears to be called Front Porch: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/meet-the-tech-company-performing-ad-injections-for-big-cable/
comcast  ads  injection  security  javascript  http  network-neutrality  isps 
september 2014 by jm

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