jm + init   7

Structural and semantic deficiencies in the systemd architecture for real-world service management, a technical treatise
Despite its overarching abstractions, it is semantically non-uniform and its complicated transaction and job scheduling heuristics ordered around a dependently networked object system create pathological failure cases with little debugging context that would otherwise not necessarily occur on systems with less layers of indirection. The use of bus APIs complicate communication with the service manager and lead to duplication of the object model for little gain. Further, the unit file options often carry implicit state or are not sufficiently expressive. There is an imbalance with regards to features of an eager service manager and that of a lazy loading service manager, having rusty edge cases of both with non-generic, manager-specific facilities. The approach to logging and the circularly dependent architecture seem to imply that lots of prior art has been ignored or understudied.
analysis  systemd  linux  unix  ops  init  critiques  software  logging 
november 2015 by jm
Why I dislike systemd
Good post, and hard to disagree.
One of the "features" of systemd is that it allows you to boot a system without needing a shell at all. This seems like such a senseless manoeuvre that I can't help but think of it as a knee-jerk reaction to the perception of Too Much Shell in sysv init scripts.
In exactly which universe is it reasonable to assume that you have a running D-Bus service (or kdbus) and a filesystem containing unit files, all the binaries they refer to, all the libraries they link against, and all the configuration files any of them reference, but that you lack that most ubiquitous of UNIX binaries, /bin/sh?
history  linux  unix  systemd  bsd  system-v  init  ops  dbus 
june 2015 by jm
uselessd
A project to reduce systemd to a base initd, process supervisor and transactional dependency system, while minimizing intrusiveness and isolationism. Basically, it’s systemd with the superfluous stuff cut out, a (relatively) coherent idea of what it wants to be, support for non-glibc platforms and an approach that aims to minimize complicated design. uselessd is still in its early stages and it is not recommended for regular use or system integration.


This may be the best option to evade the horrors of systemd.
init  linux  systemd  unix  ops  uselessd 
march 2015 by jm
Ubuntu To Officially Switch To systemd Next Monday - Slashdot
Jesus. This is going to be the biggest shitfest in the history of Linux...
linux  slashdot  ubuntu  systemd  init  unix  ops 
march 2015 by jm
Linus Torvalds and others on Linux's systemd
ZDNet's Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols on the systemd mess (via Kragen)
via:kragen  systemd  linux  ubuntu  gnome  init  ops 
october 2014 by jm
Systemd: Harbinger of the Linux apocalypse
While there are many defensible aspects of Systemd, other aspects boggle the mind. Not the least of these was that, as of a few months ago, trying to debug the kernel from the boot line would cause the system to crash. This was because of Systemd's voracious logging and the fact that Systemd responds to the "debug" flag on the kernel boot line -- a flag meant for the kernel, not anything else. That, straight up, is a bug.

However, the Systemd developers didn't see it that way and actively fought with those experiencing the problem. Add the fact that one of the Systemd developers was banned by Linus Torvalds for poor attitude and bad design and another was responsible for causing significant issues with Linux audio support, but blamed the problem on everything else but his software, and you have a bad situation on your hands.

There's no shortage of egos in the open source development world. There's no shortage of new ideas and veteran developers and administrators pooh-poohing something new simply because it's new. But there are also 45 years of history behind Unix and extremely good reasons it's still flourishing. Tools designed like Systemd do not fit the Linux mold, to their own detriment. Systemd's design has more in common with Windows than with Unix -- down to the binary logging.


The link re systemd consuming the "debug" kernel boot arg is a canonical example of inflexible coders refusing to fix their own bugs. (via Jason Dixon)
systemd  linux  red-hat  egos  linus-torvalds  unix  init  booting  debugging  logging  design  software  via:obfuscurity 
august 2014 by jm

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