jm + infringement   8

U.S. top court tightens patent suit rules in blow to 'patent trolls'
This is excellent news, and a death knell for the East Texas patent troll court (cf https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/the-small-town-judge-who-sees-a-quarter-of-the-nations-patent-cases ):
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday tightened rules for where patent lawsuits can be filed in a decision that may make it harder for so-called patent "trolls" to launch sometimes dodgy patent cases in friendly courts, a major irritant for high-tech giants like Apple and Alphabet Inc's Google.

In a decision that upends 27 years of law governing patent infringement cases, the justices sided with beverage flavoring company TC Heartland LLC in its legal battle with food and beverage company Kraft Heinz Co (KHC.O). The justices ruled 8-0 that patent suits can be filed only in courts located in the jurisdiction where the targeted company is incorporated.


via Brad Fitzgerald
via:bradfitz  patents  swpats  east-texas  law  trolls  supreme-court  infringement 
may 2017 by jm
Small claims triumph as aerial photographer routs flagrant infringers
This is great news. Flagrant copyright infringement of an aerial photograph penalised to the order of UKP 2,716
copyright  infringement  small-claims  law  uk  webb-aviation  photography  images 
april 2015 by jm
Help the GNOME Foundation defend the GNOME trademark
Recently Groupon announced a product with the same product name as GNOME. Groupon’s product is a tablet based point of sale “operating system for merchants to run their entire operation." The GNOME community was shocked that Groupon would use our mark for a product so closely related to the GNOME desktop and technology. It was almost inconceivable to us that Groupon, with over $2.5 billion in annual revenue, a full legal team and a huge engineering staff would not have heard of the GNOME project, found our trademark registration using a casual search, or even found our website, but we nevertheless got in touch with them and asked them to pick another name. Not only did Groupon refuse, but it has now filed even more trademark applications (the full list of applications they filed can be found here, here and here). To use the GNOME name for a proprietary software product that is antithetical to the fundamental ideas of the GNOME community, the free software community and the GNU project is outrageous. Please help us fight this huge company as they try to trade on our goodwill and hard earned reputation.
gnome  groupon  trademark  infringement  open-source  operating-systems  ip  law  floss 
november 2014 by jm
UK private copying exception plans face possible legal action
Under the proposed private copying exception, individuals in the UK would be given a new right to make a copy of copyrighted material they have lawfully and permanently acquired for their private use, provided it was not for commercial ends. Making a private copy of the material in these circumstances would not be an act of copyright infringement, although making a private copy of a computer program would still be prohibited under the plans.

There is no mechanism envisaged in the draft legislation for rights holders to be specifically compensated for the act of private copying. This prompted the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments (JCSI), tasked with scrutinising the proposals, to warn parliamentarians that the rules may be deemed to be in breach of EU copyright laws as a result of the lack of 'fair compensation' mechanism. [...]

"We are disappointed that the private copying exception will be introduced without providing fair compensation for British songwriters, performers and other rights holders within the creative sector. A mechanism for fair compensation is a requirement of European law. In response we are considering our legal options," [UK Music] said.
uk  law  copyright  music  copying  private-copying  personal  infringement  piracy  transcoding  backup 
july 2014 by jm
Adding Insult to Plagiary?
A few days old, but already an instant Streisand-Effect classic:
Sometimes people borrow [Colin Purrington's free guide about making scientific posters] without giving him credit. This happens fairly regularly, and when he finds out about it, he sends an e-mail asking them to take it down. Usually they do. But when he sent an e-mail to the Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, asking that a roughly 1,200-word, near-verbatim, uncredited chunk from his guide be removed from the consortium’s materials, the response was unexpected. Rather than apologise, a lawyer sent him a cease-and-desist letter accusing him of plagiarizing the consortium’s materials and demanding that he take down his guide or face a lawsuit seeking damages up to $150,000.
streisand-effect  lawsuits  law  infringement  copyright  cpbr  bullying  science  posters 
april 2013 by jm
Protect your designs
A good writeup of how to detect cases of copyright infringement for photography, art and other visual media.
Von Glitschka, Modern Dog and myriad others make clear that the support of the creative community is absolutely vital in raising awareness of copyright infringements. Sites like www.youthoughtwewouldntnotice.com name and shame clear breaches of copyright, while the Modern Dog case shows that there is no better IP tracing system than the eyes and ears of the design community itself. “It’s the industry at large that has kept me aware of infringements,” states Von. “Without that I would miss most of them because I don’t go looking – they find me via the eyes of others.”
photography  art  visual-media  copyright  infringement  piracy  ripping 
april 2013 by jm
Copyfraud - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
'a term coined by Jason Mazzone (Associate Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School) to describe situations where individuals and institutions illegally claim copyright ownership of the public domain and other breaches of copyright law with little or no oversight by authorities or legal consequence for their actions.' Good term (via Nelson)
copyright  rights  ip  fraud  copyfraud  wikipedia  words  terminology  neologisms  dmca  infringement 
may 2012 by jm
ChessBase.com - Chess News - A Gross Miscarriage of Justice in Computer Chess (part two)
An amazing article, via Nelson Minar -- careful examination of the evolution of chess programs over the past 8 years appears to show clear signs of code/algorithm copying and unauthorised reverse engineering -- by many of the developers. 'Dr Søren Riis of Queen Mary University in London shows how most programs (legally) profited from Fruit, and subsequently much more so from the (illegally) reverse engineered Rybka. Yet it is Vasik Rajlich who was investigated, found guilty of plagiarism, banned for life, stripped of his titles, and vilified in the international press – for a five-year-old alleged tournament rule violation. Ironic.'
chess  code  games  open-source  licensing  reverse-engineering  copyright  infringement  via:nelson 
january 2012 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: