jm + influxdb   5

DD-WRT Network Stats Graphics using Grafana and InfluxDB
A slightly hackier approach to DD-WRT grafana metrics, but with a workaround when JFFS isn't an option
grafana  networking  metrics  dd-wrt  routers  jffs  influxdb 
29 days ago by jm
The New InfluxDB Storage Engine: A Time Structured Merge Tree
The new engine has similarities with LSM Trees (like LevelDB and Cassandra’s underlying storage). It has a write ahead log, index files that are read only, and it occasionally performs compactions to combine index files. We’re calling it a Time Structured Merge Tree because the index files keep contiguous blocks of time and the compactions merge those blocks into larger blocks of time. Compression of the data improves as the index files are compacted. Once a shard becomes cold for writes it will be compacted into as few files as possible, which yield the best compression.
influxdb  storage  lsm-trees  leveldb  tsm-trees  data-structures  algorithms  time-series  tsd  compression 
october 2015 by jm
One year of InfluxDB and the road to 1.0
half of the [Monitorama] attendees were employees and entrepreneurs at monitoring, metrics, DevOps, and server analytics companies. Most of them had a story about how their metrics API was their key intellectual property that took them years to develop. The other half of the attendees were developers at larger organizations that were rolling their own DevOps stack from a collection of open source tools. Almost all of them were creating a “time series database” with a bunch of web services code on top of some other database or just using Graphite. When everyone is repeating the same work, it’s not key intellectual property or a differentiator, it’s a barrier to entry. Not only that, it’s something that is hindering innovation in this space since everyone has to spend their first year or two getting to the point where they can start building something real. It’s like building a web company in 1998. You have to spend millions of dollars and a year building infrastructure, racking servers, and getting everything ready before you could run the application. Monitoring and analytics applications should not be like this.
graphite  monitoring  metrics  tsd  time-series  analytics  influxdb  open-source 
february 2015 by jm
PDX DevOps Graphite replacement
Replacing graphite with InfluxDB, Riemann and Grafana. Not quite there yet, looks like
influxdb  graphite  ops  metrics  riemann  grafana  slides 
december 2014 by jm
Benchmarking LevelDB vs. RocksDB vs. HyperLevelDB vs. LMDB Performance for InfluxDB
A few interesting things come out of these results. LevelDB is the winner on disk space utilization, RocksDB is the winner on reads and deletes, and HyperLevelDB is the winner on writes. On smaller runs (30M or less), LMDB came out on top on most of the metrics except for disk size. This is actually what we’d expect for B-trees: they’re faster the fewer keys you have in them.


Mind you, I'd prefer if this had tunable read/write/delete ratios, as YCSB does. Take with a pinch of salt, as with all benchmarks!
benchmarks  leveldb  datastores  storage  hyperleveldb  rocksdb  ycsb  lmdb  influxdb 
june 2014 by jm

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