jm + imsi-catchers   9

Cops Use Stingray To Almost Track Down Suspected Fast Food Thief
Law enforcement spokespeople will often point to the handful of homicide or kidnapping investigations successfully closed with the assistance of cell site simulators, but they'll gloss over the hundreds of mundane deployments performed by officers who will use anything that makes their job easier -- even if it's a tool that's Constitutionally dubious.

Don't forget, when a cell site simulator is deployed, it gathers cell phone info from everyone in the surrounding area, including those whose chicken wings have been lawfully purchased. And all of this data goes... somewhere and is held onto for as long as the agency feels like it, because most agencies don't seem to have Stingray data retention policies in place until after they've been FOIA'ed/questioned by curious legislators.

Regular policework -- which seemed to function just fine without cell tracking devices -- now apparently can't be done without thousands of dollars of military equipment. And it's not just about the chicken wing thieves law enforcement can't locate. It's about the murder suspects who are caught but who walk away when the surveillance device wipes its feet on the Fourth Amendment as it serves up questionable, post-facto search warrants and pen register orders.
stingrays  mobile  surveillance  imsi-catchers  data-retention  privacy  chicken-wings  fast-food 
june 2016 by jm
How Stingrays were unmasked
'THE DRAGNET: How a man accused of million-dollar fraud uncovered a never before seen, secret surveillance device'
stingrays  crime  fraud  surveillance  mobile  police  imsi-catchers 
january 2016 by jm
"CryptoPhone" claims to detect IMSI catchers in operation
To show what the CryptoPhone can do that less expensive competitors cannot, he points me to a map that he and his customers have created, indicating 17 different phony cell towers known as “interceptors,” detected by the CryptoPhone 500 around the United States during the month of July alone.  Interceptors look to a typical phone like an ordinary tower.  Once the phone connects with the interceptor, a variety of “over-the-air” attacks become possible, from eavesdropping on calls and texts to pushing spyware to the device.

“Interceptor use in the U.S. is much higher than people had anticipated,” Goldsmith says.  “One of our customers took a road trip from Florida to North Carolina and he found 8 different interceptors on that trip.  We even found one at South Point Casino in Las Vegas.”
imsi-catchers  security  cryptophone  phones  mobile  3g  4g  eavesdropping  surveillance 
august 2014 by jm
China detains 1,530 in telecom spam crackdown
via Christopher Soghoian: 'IMSI catchers/fake base stations are out of control in China. The gov shut down 24 IMSI catcher factories, 1500+ people were arrested.'
privacy  spam  china  imsi-catchers  mobile  3g  gsm  phones 
august 2014 by jm
Florida cops used IMSI catchers over 200 times without a warrant
Harris is the leading maker of [IMSI catchers aka "stingrays"] in the U.S., and the ACLU has long suspected that the company has been loaning the devices to police departments throughout the state for product testing and promotional purposes. As the court document notes in the 2008 case, “the Tallahassee Police Department is not the owner of the equipment.”

The ACLU now suspects these police departments may have all signed non-disclosure agreements with the vendor and used the agreement to avoid disclosing their use of the equipment to courts. “The police seem to have interpreted the agreement to bar them even from revealing their use of Stingrays to judges, who we usually rely on to provide oversight of police investigations,” the ACLU writes.
aclu  police  stingrays  imsi-catchers  privacy  cellphones  mobile-phones  security  wired 
march 2014 by jm
Beirtear na IMSIs: Ireland's GSOC surveillance inquiry reveals use of mobile phone interception systems | Privacy International
It is interesting to note that the fake UK network was the only one detected by Verrimus. However, given that IMSI Catchers operate multiple fake towers simultaneously, it is highly likely that one or more Irish networks were also being intercepted. Very often a misconfiguration, such as an incorrect country code, is the only evidence available of an IMSI Catcher being deployed when forensic tools are not being used to look for one.
privacy  imsi-catchers  surveillance  bugging  spying  gsocgate  gsoc  ireland  mobile-phones 
february 2014 by jm
193_Cellxion_Brochure_UGX Series 330
The Cellxion UGX Series 330 is a 'transportable Dual GSM/Triple UMTS Firewall and Analysis Tool' -- ie. an IMSI catcher in a briefcase, capable of catching IMSI/IMEIs in 3G. It even supports configurable signal strength. Made in the UK
cellxion  imsi-catchers  imei  surveillance  gsocgate  gsm  3g  mobile-phones  security  spying 
february 2014 by jm
The Spyware That Enables Mobile-Phone Snooping - Bloomberg
More background on IMSI catchers -- looking likely to have been the "government-level technology" used to snoop on the Garda Ombudsman's offices, particularly given the 'detection of an unexpected UK 3G network near the GSOC offices':
The technology involved is called cellular interception. The active variety of this, the “IMSI catcher,” is a portable device that masquerades as a mobile phone tower. Any phone within range (a mile for a low-grade IMSI catcher; as much as 100 miles for a passive interception device with a very large antenna, such as those used in India) automatically checks to see if the device is a tower operated by its carrier, and the false “tower” indicates that it is. It then logs the phone’s International Mobile Subscriber Identity number -- and begins listening in on its calls, texts and data communications. No assistance from any wireless carrier is needed; the phone has been tricked.
[...] “network extender” devices -- personal mobile-phone towers -- sold by the carriers themselves, often called femtocells, can be turned into IMSI catchers.


Via T.J. McIntyre
via:tjmcintyre  imsi-catchers  surveillance  privacy  gsocgate  mobile-phones  spying  imsi 
february 2014 by jm
"IMSI Catcher" used in London
'One case involved Julian Assange's current home at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where visitors were surprised to receive welcome messages from a Ugandan telephone company. It turned out the messages were coming from a foreign base station device installed on the roof, masquerading as a cell tower for surveillance purposes. Appelbaum suspects the GCHQ simply forgot to reformat the device from an earlier Ugandan operation.'


via T.J. McIntyre.
surveillance  nsa  privacy  imsi-catchers  gchq  london  uganda  mobile-phones  julian-assange  ecuador  embassies 
february 2014 by jm

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