jm + huawei   4

Open Source Could Be a Casualty of the Trade War
ideologically, a core tenant of open source is non-discriminatory empowerment. When I was introduced to open source in the 90’s, the chief “bad guy” was Microsoft – people wanted to defend against “embrace, extend, extinguish” corporate practices, and by homesteading on the technological frontier with GNU/Linux we were ensuring that our livelihoods, independence, and security would never be beholden to a hostile corporate power.

Now, the world has changed. Our open source code may end up being labeled as enabling a “foreign adversary”. I never suspected that I could end up on the “wrong side” of politics by being a staunch advocate of open source, but here I am. My open source mission is to empower people to be technologically independent; to know that technology is not magic, so that nobody will ever be a slave to technology. This is true even if that means resisting my own government. The erosion of freedom starts with restricting access to “foreign adversaries”, and ends with the government arbitrarily picking politically convenient winners and losers to participate in the open source ecosystem.

Freedom means freedom, and I will stand to defend it.

Now that the US is carpet-bombing Huawei’s supply chain, I fear there is no turning back. The language already written into EO13873 sets the stage to threaten open source as a whole by drawing geopolitical and national security borders over otherwise non-discriminatory development efforts. While I still hold hope that the trade war could de-escalate, the proliferation and stockpiling of powerful anti-trade weapons like EO13873 is worrisome. Now is the time to raise awareness of the threat this poses to the open source world, so that we can prepare and come together to protect the freedoms we cherish the most.

I hope, in all earnestness, that open source shall not be a casualty of this trade war.
open-source  business  china  economics  huawei  us-politics  trade-war  oss  gnu  linux 
8 weeks ago by jm
Oh dear. Huawei enterprise router 'backdoor' was Telnet, sighs Vodafone
LOL:
Characterising Telnet as a backdoor is a bit like describing your catflap as an access portal with no physical security features that allows multiple species to pass unhindered through a critical home security layer. In other words, massively over-egging the pudding.
huawei  vodafone  funny  security  bloomberg  overexcited  drama  us-politics  china 
april 2019 by jm
Just As We Warned: A Chinese Tech Giant Goes On The Patent Attack -- In East Texas | Techdirt
Techdirt has been warning for years that the West's repeated demands for China to "respect" patents could backfire badly. [...] And guess what? That is exactly what has just happened, as The Wall Street Journal reports:

'Huawei Technologies Co. said it has filed a lawsuit against T-Mobile US Inc., alleging the U.S. telecommunications carrier violated the Chinese company’s patents related to wireless networks. In its complaint filed this week in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, Huawei said T-Mobile is using its patented technology without signing a licensing agreement.'


At least this is the most likely scenario to result in patent reform, finally.
patents  east-texas  huawei  t-mobile  telecoms  law 
july 2016 by jm
BBC News - Chinese firm Huawei controls net filter praised by PM
Talk Talk's porn-filtering, system praised by David Cameron in the UK as a model for porn filtering for the country's ISPs, is operated by Huawei. Of course, there's no possible problems with allowing Huawei, with its alleged close ties to the Chinese government, operate a state-wide internet censorship system in the UK without any functioning oversight, right? ;)

Also worth noting: all TalkTalk traffic passes through the Huawei filtering infrastructure, even when the customer has "opted in".
huawei  talk-talk  oversight  overblocking  politics  china  uk  david-cameron  filtering  censorship 
july 2013 by jm

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