jm + http2   11

Internet protocols are changing
per @mnot. HTTP/2; TLS 1.3; QUIC and UDP; and DOH (DNS over HTTP!)
crypto  encryption  http  https  protocols  http2  tls  quic  udp  tcp  dns  tunnelling 
december 2017 by jm
Nchan
Nchan is a scalable, flexible pub/sub server for the modern web, built as a module for the Nginx web server. It can be configured as a standalone server, or as a shim between your application and tens, thousands, or millions of live subscribers. It can buffer messages in memory, on-disk, or via Redis. All connections are handled asynchronously and distributed among any number of worker processes. It can also scale to many nginx server instances with Redis. Messages are published to channels with HTTP POST requests or websockets, and subscribed also through websockets, long-polling, EventSource (SSE), old-fashioned interval polling, and more. Each subscriber can listen to up to 255 channels per connection, and can be optionally authenticated via a custom application url. An events meta channel is also available for debugging.


Also now supports HTTP/2. This used to be called the Nginx HTTP Push Module, and I used it with great results in that form. This is the way to do HTTP push in all its forms....
nginx  pubsub  websockets  sse  http  http-push  http2  redis  long-polling  nchan 
january 2016 by jm
WebSockets, caution required!
This, so much.
There are very valid technical reasons many of the biggest sites on the Internet have not adopted them. Twitter use HTTP/2 + polling, Facebook and Gmail use Long Polling. Saying WebSockets are the only way and the way of the future, is wrongheaded. HTTP/2 may end up winning this battle due to the huge amount of WebSocket connections web browsers allow, and HTTP/3 may unify the protocols
http  realtime  websockets  long-polling  http2  protocols  transport  web  internet 
january 2016 by jm
Google Cloud Platform HTTP/HTTPS Load Balancing
GCE's LB product is pretty nice -- HTTP/2 support, and a built-in URL mapping feature (presumably based on how Google approach that problem internally, I understand they take that approach). I'm hoping AWS are taking notes for the next generation of ELB, if that ever happens
elb  gce  google  load-balancing  http  https  spdy  http2  urls  request-routing  ops  architecture  cloud 
october 2015 by jm
OkHttp
A new HTTP client library for Android and Java, with a lot of nice features:
HTTP/2 and SPDY support allows all requests to the same host to share a socket.

Connection pooling reduces request latency (if SPDY isn’t available).

Transparent GZIP shrinks download sizes.

Response caching avoids the network completely for repeat requests.

OkHttp perseveres when the network is troublesome: it will silently recover from common connection problems. If your service has multiple IP addresses OkHttp will attempt alternate addresses if the first connect fails. This is necessary for IPv4+IPv6 and for services hosted in redundant data centers. OkHttp initiates new connections with modern TLS features (SNI, ALPN), and falls back to TLS 1.0 if the handshake fails.

Using OkHttp is easy. Its 2.0 API is designed with fluent builders and immutability. It supports both synchronous blocking calls and async calls with callbacks.
android  http  java  libraries  okhttp  http2  spdy  microservices  jdk 
july 2015 by jm
Apple to switch APNS protocol to HTTP/2
This is great news -- the current protocol is a binary, proprietary horrorshow, particularly around error reporting. Available "later this year" in production, and Pushy plan to support it.
http2  apns  pushy  apple  push-notifications  protocols  http 
june 2015 by jm
HTTP/2 is here, let's optimize! - Velocity SC 2015 - Google Slides
Changes which server-side developers will need to start considering as HTTP/2 rolls out. Remove domain sharding; stop concatenating resources; stop inlining resources; use server push.
http2  http  protocols  streaming  internet  web  dns  performance 
june 2015 by jm
grpc.io
Binary message marshalling, client/server stubs generated by an IDL compiler, bidirectional binary protocol. CORBA is back from the dead!
Intro blog post: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.ie/2015/02/introducing-grpc-new-open-source-http2.html

Relevant: Steve Vinoski's commentary on protobuf-rpc back in 2008: http://steve.vinoski.net/blog/2008/07/13/protocol-buffers-leaky-rpc/
http  rpc  http2  netty  grpc  google  corba  idl  messaging 
february 2015 by jm
Can HTTP/2 Replace MQTT?
MQTT definitely has a smaller size on the wire. It’s also simpler to parse (let’s face it, Huffman isn’t that easy to implement) and provides guaranteed delivery to cater to shaky wireless networks. On the other hand, it’s also not terribly extensible. There aren’t a whole lot of headers and options available, and there’s no way to make custom ones without touching the payload of the message.

It seems that HTTP/2 could definitely serve as a reasonable replacement for MQTT. It’s reasonably small, supports multiple paradigms (pub/sub & request/response) and is extensible. Its also supported by the IETF (whereas MQTT is hosted by OASIS). From conversations I’ve had with industry leaders in the embedded software and chip manufacturing, they only want to support standards from the IETF. Many of them are still planning to support MQTT, but they’re not happy about it.

I think MQTT is better at many of the things it was designed for, but I’m interested to see over time if those advantages are enough to outweigh the benefits of HTTP. Regardless, MQTT has been gaining a lot of traction in the past year or two, so you may be forced into using it while HTTP/2 catches up.
http2  mqtt  iot  pub-sub  protocols  ietf  embedded  push  http 
february 2015 by jm
"High Performance Browser Networking", by Ilya Grigorik, read online for free
Wow, this looks excellent. A must-read for people working on systems with high-volume, low-latency phone-to-server communications -- and free!
How prepared are you to build fast and efficient web applications? This eloquent book provides what every web developer should know about the network, from fundamental limitations that affect performance to major innovations for building even more powerful browser applications—including HTTP 2.0 and XHR improvements, Server-Sent Events (SSE), WebSocket, and WebRTC.

Author Ilya Grigorik, a web performance engineer at Google, demonstrates performance optimization best practices for TCP, UDP, and TLS protocols, and explains unique wireless and mobile network optimization requirements. You’ll then dive into performance characteristics of technologies such as HTTP 2.0, client-side network scripting with XHR, real-time streaming with SSE and WebSocket, and P2P communication with WebRTC.

Deliver optimal TCP, UDP, and TLS performance;
Optimize network performance over 3G/4G mobile networks;
Develop fast and energy-efficient mobile applications;
Address bottlenecks in HTTP 1.x and other browser protocols;
Plan for and deliver the best HTTP 2.0 performance;
Enable efficient real-time streaming in the browser;
Create efficient peer-to-peer videoconferencing and low-latency applications with real-time WebRTC transports


Via Eoin Brazil.
book  browser  networking  performance  phones  mobile  3g  4g  hsdpa  http  udp  tls  ssl  latency  webrtc  websockets  ebooks  via:eoin-brazil  google  http2  sse  xhr  ilya-grigorik 
october 2013 by jm

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