jm + hp   3

HP is trying to patent Continuous Delivery
This is appalling bollocks from HP:
On 1st March 2015 I discovered that in 2012 HP had filed a patent (WO2014027990) with the USPO for ‘Performance tests in a continuous deployment pipeline‘ (the patent was granted in 2014). [....] HP has filed several patents covering standard Continuous Delivery (CD) practices. You can help to have these patents revoked by providing ‘prior art’ examples on Stack Exchange.

In fairness, though, this kind of shit happens in most big tech companies. This is what happens when you have a broken software patenting system, with big rewards for companies who obtain shitty troll patents like these, and in turn have companies who reward the engineers who sell themselves out to write up concepts which they know have prior art. Software patents are broken by design!
cd  devops  hp  continuous-deployment  testing  deployment  performance  patents  swpats  prior-art 
march 2015 by jm
Reversing Sinclair's amazing 1974 calculator hack - half the ROM of the HP-35
Amazing reverse engineering.
In a hotel room in Texas, Clive Sinclair had a big problem. He wanted to sell a cheap scientific calculator that would grab the market from expensive calculators such as the popular HP-35. Hewlett-Packard had taken two years, 20 engineers, and a million dollars to design the HP-35, which used 5 complex chips and sold for $395. Sinclair's partnership with calculator manufacturer Bowmar had gone nowhere. Now Texas Instruments offered him an inexpensive calculator chip that could barely do four-function math. Could he use this chip to build a $100 scientific calculator?
Texas Instruments' engineers said this was impossible - their chip only had 3 storage registers, no subroutine calls, and no storage for constants such as π. The ROM storage in the calculator held only 320 instructions, just enough for basic arithmetic. How could they possibly squeeze any scientific functions into this chip?

Fortunately Clive Sinclair, head of Sinclair Radionics, had a secret weapon - programming whiz and math PhD Nigel Searle. In a few days in Texas, they came up with new algorithms and wrote the code for the world's first single-chip scientific calculator, somehow programming sine, cosine, tangent, arcsine, arccos, arctan, log, and exponentiation into the chip. The engineers at Texas Instruments were amazed.

How did they do it? Up until now it's been a mystery. But through reverse engineering, I've determined the exact algorithms and implemented a simulator that runs the calculator's actual code. The reverse-engineered code along with my detailed comments is in the window below.
reversing  reverse-engineering  history  calculators  sinclair  ti  hp  chips  silicon  hacks 
august 2013 by jm
Videos from the Continuous Delivery track at QCon SF 2012
Think we'll be watching some of these in work soon -- Jez Humble's talk (the last one) in particular looks good:

Amazon, Etsy, Google and Facebook are all primarily software development shops which command enormous amounts of resources. They are, to use Christopher Little’s metaphor, unicorns. How can the rest of us adopt continuous delivery? That’s the subject of my talk, which describes four case studies of organizations that adopted continuous delivery, with varying degrees of success.

One of my favourites – partly because it’s embedded software, not a website – is the story of HP’s LaserJet Firmware team, who re-architected their software around the principles of continuous delivery. People always want to know the business case for continuous delivery: the FutureSmart team provide one in the book they wrote that discusses how they did it.
continuous-integration  continuous-delivery  build  release  process  dev  deployment  videos  qcon  towatch  hp 
may 2013 by jm

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