jm + guava   10

Caffeine cache adopts Window TinyLfu eviction policy
'Caffeine is a Java 8 rewrite of Guava's cache. In this version we focused on improving the hit rate by evaluating alternatives to the classic least-recenty-used (LRU) eviction policy. In collaboration with researchers at Israel's Technion, we developed a new algorithm that matches or exceeds the hit rate of the best alternatives (ARC, LIRS). A paper of our work is being prepared for publication.'

Specifically:
W-TinyLfu uses a small admission LRU that evicts to a large Segmented LRU if accepted by the TinyLfu admission policy. TinyLfu relies on a frequency sketch to probabilistically estimate the historic usage of an entry. The window allows the policy to have a high hit rate when entries exhibit a high temporal / low frequency access pattern which would otherwise be rejected. The configuration enables the cache to estimate the frequency and recency of an entry with low overhead. This implementation uses a 4-bit CountMinSketch, growing at 8 bytes per cache entry to be accurate. Unlike ARC and LIRS, this policy does not retain non-resident keys.
tinylfu  caches  caching  cache-eviction  java8  guava  caffeine  lru  count-min  sketching  algorithms 
november 2015 by jm
OG-Commons/Guavate.java
'Utilities that help bridge the gap between Java 8 and Google Guava. Guava has the {@link FluentIterable} concept which is similar to streams. In many ways, fluent iterable is nicer, because it directly binds to the immutable collection classes. However, on balance it seems wise to use the stream API rather than {@code FluentIterable} in Java 8.'
guava  java-8  java  fluentiterable  streams  fluent  coding 
april 2015 by jm
ben-manes/caffeine
'Caffeine is a Java 8 based concurrency library that provides specialized data structures, such as a high performance cache.'
cache  java8  java  guava  caching  concurrency  data-structures  coding 
march 2015 by jm
stout
a C++ library adding some modern language features like Option, Try, Stopwatch, and other Guava-ish things (via @cscotta)
c++  library  stout  option  try  guava  coding 
july 2014 by jm
Jump Consistent Hash: A Fast, Minimal Memory, Consistent Hash Algorithm
'a fast, minimal memory, consistent hash algorithm that can be expressed in about 5 lines of code. In comparison to the algorithm of Karger et al., jump consistent hash requires no storage, is faster, and does a better job of evenly dividing the key space among the buckets and of evenly dividing the workload when the number of buckets changes. Its main limitation is that the buckets must be numbered sequentially, which makes it more suitable for data storage applications than for distributed web caching.'

Implemented in Guava. This is also noteworthy:

'Google has not applied for patent protection for this algorithm, and, as of this writing, has no plans to. Rather, it wishes to contribute this algorithm to the community.'
hashing  consistent-hashing  google  guava  memory  algorithms  sharding 
june 2014 by jm
guava-retrying
Apache-licensed open source java lib to implement retrying behaviour cleanly.
a general purpose method for retrying arbitrary Java code with specific stop, retry, and exception handling capabilities that are enhanced by Guava's predicate matching. It also includes an exponential backoff WaitStrategy that might be useful for situations where more well-behaved service polling is preferred.
retries  retrying  resiliency  fault-tolerance  java  open-source  guava 
february 2013 by jm
ElementCostInDataStructures
"The cost per element in major data structures offered by Java and Guava (r11)]." A very useful reference!

Ever wondered what's the cost of adding each entry to a HashMap? Or one new element in a TreeSet? Here are the answers: the cost per-entry for each well-known structure in Java and Guava. You can use this to estimate the cost of a structure, like this: if the per-entry cost of a structure is 32 bytes, and your structure contains 1024 elements, the structure's footprint will be around 32 kilobytes. Note that non-tree mutable structures are amortized (adding an element might trigger a resize, and be expensive, otherwise it would be cheap), making the measurement of the "average per element cost" measurement hard, but you can expect that the real answers are close to what is reported below.
java  coding  guava  reference  memory  cost  performance  data-structures 
october 2012 by jm
Striped (Guava: Google Core Libraries for Java 13.0.1 API)
Nice piece of Guava concurrency infrastructure in the latest release:
A striped Lock/Semaphore/ReadWriteLock. This offers the underlying lock striping similar to that of ConcurrentHashMap in a reusable form, and extends it for semaphores and read-write locks. Conceptually, lock striping is the technique of dividing a lock into many stripes, increasing the granularity of a single lock and allowing independent operations to lock different stripes and proceed concurrently, instead of creating contention for a single lock.<br>

The guarantee provided by this class is that equal keys lead to the same lock (or semaphore), i.e. if (key1.equals(key2)) then striped.get(key1) == striped.get(key2) (assuming Object.hashCode() is correctly implemented for the keys). Note that if key1 is not equal to key2, it is not guaranteed that striped.get(key1) != striped.get(key2); the elements might nevertheless be mapped to the same lock. The lower the number of stripes, the higher the probability of this happening.<br>

Prior to this class, one might be tempted to use Map<K, Lock>, where K represents the task. This maximizes concurrency by having each unique key mapped to a unique lock, but also maximizes memory footprint. On the other extreme, one could use a single lock for all tasks, which minimizes memory footprint but also minimizes concurrency. Instead of choosing either of these extremes, Striped allows the user to trade between required concurrency and memory footprint. For example, if a set of tasks are CPU-bound, one could easily create a very compact Striped<Lock> of availableProcessors() * 4 stripes, instead of possibly thousands of locks which could be created in a Map<K, Lock> structure.
locking  concurrency  java  guava  semaphores  coding  via:twitter 
september 2012 by jm
Dropwizard
'a Java framework for developing ops-friendly, high-performance, RESTful web services. Developed by Yammer to power their JVM-based backend services, Dropwizard pulls together stable, mature libraries from the Java ecosystem into a simple, lightweight package that lets you focus on getting things done. Dropwizard has out-of-the-box support for sophisticated configuration, application metrics, logging, operational tools, and much more, allowing you and your team to ship a production-quality HTTP+JSON web service in the shortest time possible.' From Coda Hale/Yammer; includes Guava, Jetty, Jersey, Jackson, Metrics, slf4j. Pretty good baseline to start any new Java service with....
framework  http  java  rest  web  jersey  guava  jackson  jetty  json  web-services  yammer 
may 2012 by jm
Google Guava BloomFIlter
neat, Guava now has a builtin Bloom filter implementation using the murmur hash. that'll potentially save a little hassle in the future
guava  coding  java  bloom-filters  data-structures  sets 
march 2012 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: