jm + guardian   19

Ireland's staggering hypocrisy on climate change | Environment | The Guardian
The national climate policy is a greenwash – the country is certain to miss its 2020 emissions target and still handing out drilling licences
guardian  green  greenwashing  ireland  politics  energy  future  climate-change  nmp  oil  fossil-fuels 
25 days ago by jm
Tech companies like Facebook not above the law, says Max Schrems
“Big companies didn’t only rely on safe harbour: they also rely on binding corporate rules and standard contractual clauses. But it’s interesting that the court decided the case on fundamental rights grounds: so it doesn’t matter remotely what ground you transfer on, if that process is still illegal under 7 and 8 of charter, it can’t be done.”


Also:
“Ireland has no interest in doing its job, and will continue not to, forever. Clearly it’s an investment issue – but overall the policy is: we don’t regulate companies here. The cost of challenging any of this in the courts is prohibitive. And the people don’t seem to care.”


:(
ireland  guardian  max-schrems  privacy  surveillance  safe-harbor  eu  us  nsa  dpc  data-protection 
october 2015 by jm
How the banks ignored the lessons of the crash
First of all, banks could be chopped up into units that can safely go bust – meaning they could never blackmail us again. Banks should not have multiple activities going on under one roof with inherent conflicts of interest. Banks should not be allowed to build, sell or own overly complex financial products – clients should be able to comprehend what they buy and investors understand the balance sheet. Finally, the penalty should land on the same head as the bonus, meaning nobody should have more reason to lie awake at night worrying over the risks to the bank’s capital or reputation than the bankers themselves. You might expect all major political parties to have come out by now with their vision of a stable and productive financial sector. But this is not what has happened.
banks  banking  guardian  finance  europe  eu  crash  history 
september 2015 by jm
David Cameron in 'cloud cuckoo land' over encrypted messaging apps ban | Technology | The Guardian
One insider at a major US technology firm told the Guardian that “politicians are fond of asking why it is that tech companies don’t base themselves in the UK” ... “I think if you’re saying that encryption is the problem, at a time when consumers and businesses see encryption as a very necessary part of trust online, that’s a very indicative point of view.”
business  guardian  david-cameron  uk-politics  crypto  ripa  messaging  internet  privacy 
january 2015 by jm
Yes, Isis exploits technology. But that’s no reason to compromise our privacy | Technology | The Observer
From the very beginning, Isis fanatics have been up to speed on [social media]. Which raises an interesting question: how come that GCHQ and the other intelligence agencies failed to notice the rise of the Isis menace until it was upon us? Were they so busy hoovering metadata and tapping submarine cables and “mastering the internet” (as the code name of one of their projects puts it) that they didn’t have time to see what every impressionable Muslim 14-year-old in the world with an internet connection could see?
gchq  guardian  encryption  nsa  isis  technology  social-media  snooping  surveillance 
november 2014 by jm
Theresa May warns Yahoo that its move to Dublin is a security worry
Y! is moving to Dublin to evade GCHQ spying on its users. And what is the UK response?
"There are concerns in the Home Office about how Ripa will apply to Yahoo once it has moved its headquarters to Dublin," said a Whitehall source. "The home secretary asked to see officials from Yahoo because in Dublin they don't have equivalent laws to Ripa. This could particularly affect investigations led by Scotland Yard and the national crime agency. They regard this as a very serious issue."


There's priorities for you!
ripa  gchq  guardian  uk  privacy  data-protection  ireland  dublin  london  spying  surveillance  yahoo 
march 2014 by jm
UK porn filter blocks game update that contained 'sex' in URL
Staggeringly inept. The UK national porn filter blocks based on a regexp match of the URL against /.*sex.*/i -- the good old "Scunthorpe problem". Better, it returns a 404 response. This is also a good demonstration of how web filtering has unintended side effects, breaking third-party software updates with its false positives.
The update to online strategy game League of Legends was disrupted by the internet filter because the software attempted to access files that accidentally include the word “sex” in the middle of their file names. The block resulted in the update failing with “file not found” errors, which are usually created by missing files or broken updates on the part of the developers.
uk  porn  filtering  guardian  regular-expressions  false-positives  scunthorpe  http  web  league-of-legends  sex 
january 2014 by jm
The Snowden files: why the British public should be worried about GCHQ
When the Guardian offered John Lanchester access to the GCHQ files, the journalist and novelist was initially unconvinced. But what the papers told him was alarming: that Britain is sliding towards an entirely new kind of surveillance society
john-lanchester  gchq  guardian  surveillance  snooping  police-state  nsa  privacy  government 
october 2013 by jm
Schneier on Security: The NSA Is Breaking Most Encryption on the Internet
The new Snowden revelations are explosive. Basically, the NSA is able to decrypt most of the Internet. They're doing it primarily by cheating, not by mathematics.
It's joint reporting between the Guardian, the New York Times, and ProPublica.
I have been working with Glenn Greenwald on the Snowden documents, and I have seen a lot of them. These are my two essays on today's revelations.
Remember this: The math is good, but math has no agency. Code has agency, and the code has been subverted.
encryption  communication  government  nsa  security  bruce-schneier  crypto  politics  snooping  gchq  guardian  journalism 
september 2013 by jm
David Miranda, schedule 7 and the danger that all reporters now face | Alan Rusbridger | Comment is free | The Guardian
The man was unmoved. And so one of the more bizarre moments in the Guardian's long history occurred – with two GCHQ security experts overseeing the destruction of hard drives in the Guardian's basement just to make sure there was nothing in the mangled bits of metal which could possibly be of any interest to passing Chinese agents. "We can call off the black helicopters," joked one as we swept up the remains of a MacBook Pro.

Whitehall was satisfied, but it felt like a peculiarly pointless piece of symbolism that understood nothing about the digital age. We will continue to do patient, painstaking reporting on the Snowden documents, we just won't do it in London. The seizure of Miranda's laptop, phones, hard drives and camera will similarly have no effect on Greenwald's work.

The state that is building such a formidable apparatus of surveillance will do its best to prevent journalists from reporting on it. Most journalists can see that. But I wonder how many have truly understood the absolute threat to journalism implicit in the idea of total surveillance, when or if it comes – and, increasingly, it looks like "when".

We are not there yet, but it may not be long before it will be impossible for journalists to have confidential sources. Most reporting – indeed, most human life in 2013 – leaves too much of a digital fingerprint. Those colleagues who denigrate Snowden or say reporters should trust the state to know best (many of them in the UK, oddly, on the right) may one day have a cruel awakening. One day it will be their reporting, their cause, under attack. But at least reporters now know to stay away from Heathrow transit lounges.
nsa  gchq  surveillance  spying  snooping  guardian  reporters  journalism  uk  david-miranda  glenn-greenwald  edward-snowden 
august 2013 by jm
Bayes' theorem ruled inadmissible in UK law courts
Bayes' theorem, and 'similar statistical analysis', ruled inadmissible in UK law courts (via Tony Finch)
uk  law  guardian  via:fanf  bayes  maths  statistics  legal 
october 2011 by jm
Charanjit Singh on how he invented acid house ... by mistake
An interview (of sorts)! 'Cast your mind to the acid house scene and your immediate thought probably doesn't involve an ageing Bollywood session musician. Yet the softly spoken Indian man who greets me at the door of his friend's suburban Acton home on a sunny Sunday morning is credited with creating what some have labelled the first ever acid house record.'
acid-house  music  via:xxjfg  guardian  interviews  history  india  bollywood  ragas 
may 2011 by jm
Today's Guardian
Phil Gyford reworks the Grauniad's website using their open content API. I really like the navigation and just-the-text nature, but I still feel a need to know what other articles are "nearby", which this doesn't quite provide. Still, excellent work
phil-gyford  news  newspapers  gu  guardian  design  usability  reading  readability  webdesign  from delicious
june 2010 by jm
Make your own sourdough | Life and style | The Guardian
more recipes. This one looks like a good guide to creating a starter culture, something I've been meaning to do for a while
sourdough  bread  recipes  food  guardian  from delicious
april 2010 by jm
Thomasina Miers' simple Mexican recipes | Life and style | The Observer
some pretty good "ports" of Mexican recipes to ingredients available over here, must try these
mexican  food  guardian  recipes  tortas  tlayudas  ceviche  tacos  burritos  from delicious
april 2010 by jm
Irish music blogs under attack over royalties | Music | guardian.co.uk
'If IMRO goes ahead with its plan, targeting music blogs around the world, there will soon be legions of frustrated bloggers. And it will be much worse if other regional publishers follow suit.'
imro  ireland  guardian  news  blogs  music  mp3  shakedown  from delicious
april 2010 by jm

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