jm + great-firewall   6

Google used a Baidu front-end to scrape user searches without consent
The engineers used the data they pulled from [acquired Baidu front-end site] 265.com to learn about the kinds of things that people located in mainland China routinely search for in Mandarin. This helped them to build a prototype of Dragonfly. The engineers used the sample queries from 265.com, for instance, to review lists of websites Chinese people would see if they typed the same word or phrase into Google. They then used a tool they called “BeaconTower” to check whether any websites in the Google search results would be blocked by China’s internet censorship system, known as the Great Firewall. Through this process, the engineers compiled a list of thousands of banned websites, which they integrated into the Dragonfly search platform so that it would purge links to websites prohibited in China, such as those of the online encyclopedia Wikipedia and British news broadcaster BBC.

Under normal company protocol, analysis of people’s search queries is subject to tight constraints and should be reviewed by the company’s privacy staff, whose job is to safeguard user rights. But the privacy team only found out about the 265.com data access after The Intercept revealed it, and were “really pissed,” according to one Google source.
china  search  tech  google  privacy  baidu  interception  censorship  great-firewall  dragonfly 
4 weeks ago by jm
Chinese authorities compromise millions in cyberattacks
"[The] Great Firewall [of China] has switched from being a passive, inbound filter to being an active and aggressive outbound one."
china  great-firewall  censorship  cyberwarfare  github  ddos  baidu  future 
march 2015 by jm
China’s Internet Censors Now Have Their Own Theme Song, And It Is Glorious - China Real Time Report - WSJ
According to a report posted Thursday to the website of the state-run China Youth Daily, the Cyberspace Administration of China choral group this week unveiled a new song, “Cyberspace Spirit,” glorifying the cleanliness and clarity of China’s uniquely managed Internet.
The song, an orchestral march built around a chorus that proclaims China’s ambition to become an “Internet power,” opens with lyrics describing celestial bodies keeping careful watch over the sky. From there, the lyrics conjure more vivid imagery, comparing the Internet to “a beam of incorruptible sunlight” that unites “the powers of life from all creation.”
china  great-firewall  censorship  music  songs  cyberspace-spirit  omgwtfbbq 
february 2015 by jm
Chinese Internet Traffic Redirected to Small Wyoming House
'That address — which is home to some 2,000 companies on paper — was the subject of a lengthy 2011 Reuters investigation that found that among the entities registered to the address were a shell company controlled by a jailed former Ukraine prime minister; the owner of a company charged with helping online poker operators evade an Internet gambling ban; and one entity that was banned from government contracts after selling counterfeit truck parts to the Pentagon.'
china  internet  great-firewall  dns  wyoming  attacks  security  not-the-onion 
january 2014 by jm
Digital Rights Ireland blog post on the secret internet-filtering plans
'it becomes clear that for some time now the Department of Justice has been proposing the introduction of internet blocking in Ireland – and has been doing this under the radar, without any public consultation or legislative approval. Indeed, it is clear from the list that the Department is not planning on introducing legislation but instead intends to introduce this new form of censorship without any legal basis, based on the now discredited Norwegian and Danish models.' This is very bad news indeed
ireland  censorship  filtering  internet  great-firewall  dri  politics  freedom  from delicious
april 2010 by jm
Putting up barriers to a free and open internet - The Irish Times
Ireland's Dept of Justice is investigating setting up a "Great Firewall" filtering the country's internet, a la China and Australia. “Blocking involves censorship taken on no legal basis. There is no judge, no jury and no right to be heard if you are blocked,” says [DRI's TJ] McIntyre. “The chances are it also will be used in unaccountable ways by unaccountable organisations.”
blocking  censorship  government  internet  ireland  dri  filtering  great-firewall  from delicious
april 2010 by jm

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