jm + galway   7

Tim Robinson's townland index for Connemara and the Aran Islands | NUI Galway Digital Collections
Legendary west-of-Ireland mapmaker Tim Robinson has an archive at NUIG -- including the maps themselves.
An extensive card catalogue compiled by Tim Robinson throughout the 1980s and 1990s, drawn from his field notes. The series has been arranged by Robinson into civil parishes, and further divided into townlands. For most of the townlands, there are several record cards that give a detailed description of the local landscape. These describe historical, ecclesiastical, geological, and archaeological features. Anecdotes and local lore also feature in these. Robinson adds the names of people who helped him compile his information, usually local people, and often correspondents who sent him information helping him identify the origins of placenames, or certain landmarks and artefacts.
The cards also credit several secondary sources, including the OS maps and corresponding Field Name Books, Hardiman's History of Galway, Alexander Nimmo's map of the bogs in the West of Ireland, and many more.
In all cases in this series, the placename Tim Robinson used as his title appears as the title here. Many are in Irish, and some are in English. The corresponding translation is provided in the description.
tim-robinson  ireland  history  connemara  via:voxhib  galway  maps  mapping  culture  nuig 
22 days ago by jm
How wet is a cycling commute in Ireland?
It turns out that you’ll get wet 3 times more often if you’re a Galway cyclist when compared to a Dubliner. Dublin is Ireland’s driest cycling city.


Some good data and visualization on this extremely important issue
rain  rainfall-radar  ireland  climate  weather  dublin  galway  cycling 
april 2016 by jm
Why Eircode is a shambles, by someone who works in the transport industry
This is full of good points.
Without having a distinct SORT KEY for a geographically distinct area, a postcode is of no real benefit to any type of transport firm or agency.  To take one example, Eircode have used the same sort key, F92, for Arranmore (Donegal’s largest inhabited island) and the north western Donegal mainland.  Cill Rónáin, Inis Mór, the largest of the Aran Islands, has the same sort key H91, as Connemara and Galway City.  Galway city and the Aran Islands may be in a relatively small geographical area, but keen eyes may have noticed that the Aran Islands are separated from the mainland by a small section of the Atlantic Ocean.  Sort codes which ignore clear and obvious boundaries, like seas or oceans, need to be redesigned. In two seconds a [UK] website could tell a Hebridean that his delivery will take 4 days at a cost of fifty quid by using the first three characters of the postcode.  The Eircode-using Irish equivalent website would need to lookup a large database to tell an Arranmore resident the cost and time for delivery – and they’d need the full exact code.  Any mistake made here, and your estimated delivery time, and cost for delivery will be wrong.
postcodes  eircode  loc8code  fail  couriers  delivery  geodata  geocoding  galway  aran-islands 
january 2016 by jm
Expert in Savita inquiry confirms Irish women get lower standard of care with chorioamnionitis
Dr. Jen Gunter again:

Dr. Knowles’ testimony confirms for me that the law played a role, because her statements indicate the standard of care for treatment of chorioamnionitis is less aggressive in Ireland. This can only be because of the law as there is no medical evidence to support delaying delivery when chorioamnionitis is diagnosed. Standard of care is not to wait until a woman is sick enough to need a termination, the idea is to treat her, you know, before she gets sick enough. An elevated white count and ruptured membranes at 17 weeks is typically enough to make the diagnosis, so Dr. Knowles needs to testify as to what in Savita’s medical record made it safe to not recommend a delivery.

By the way, I also disagree with Dr. Knowles about her interpretation of Savita’s medical record, the chart doesn’t have “subtle indicators” of infection, it screams chorioamnionitis long before Wednesday morning. In North America the standard of care with chorioamnionitis is to recommend delivery as soon as the diagnosis is made, not wait until women enter the antechamber of death in the hopes that we can somehow snatch them back from the brink. If Irish law, or the interpretation thereof, had nothing to do with Savita’s death no expert would be mentioning sick enough at all.
jen-gunter  ob-gyn  medicine  savita  law  ireland  abortion  tragedy  galway  hospital 
april 2013 by jm
Savita Halappanavar’s inquest: the three questions that must be answered | Dr. Jen Gunter
A professional OB/GYN analyses the horrors coming to light in the Savita inquest. Here's one particular gem:
Fetal survival with ruptured membranes at 17 weeks is 0%, this is from prospective study. [...but] “real and substantial risk” to the woman’s life is what is required by the Irish constitution to terminate a pregnancy, *whether or not the foetus is viable*.


So the foetus had 0% chance of survival -- but still termination was not considered an option. Bloody hell.
religion  ireland  savita  horrors  malpractice  galway  guh  hospitals  hse  health  inquest  abortion  pro-choice  pregnancy 
april 2013 by jm
Radisson Blu Galway – I’d avoid for events « Damien Mulley
Damien shares his atrocious experiences with a Galway hotel, and (naturally) commenters from the hotel's IP address range pile on what looks like astroturf in the comments
comments  astroturf  radisson  galway  hotels  funny  events  customer-service  cluetrain  from delicious
april 2010 by jm

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