jm + future   42

Intel pcj library for persistent memory-oriented data structures
This is a "pilot" project to develop a library for Java objects stored in persistent memory. Persistent collections are being emphasized because many applications for persistent memory seem to map well to the use of collections. One of this project's goals is to make programming with persistent objects feel natural to a Java developer, for example, by using familiar Java constructs when incorporating persistence elements such as data consistency and object lifetime.

The breadth of persistent types is currently limited and the code is not performance-optimized. We are making the code available because we believe it can be useful in experiments to retrofit existing Java code to use persistent memory and to explore persistent Java programming in general.


(via Mario Fusco)
persistent-memory  data-structures  storage  persistence  java  coding  future 
20 days ago by jm
Ireland's staggering hypocrisy on climate change | Environment | The Guardian
The national climate policy is a greenwash – the country is certain to miss its 2020 emissions target and still handing out drilling licences
guardian  green  greenwashing  ireland  politics  energy  future  climate-change  nmp  oil  fossil-fuels 
12 weeks ago by jm
When Will Climate Change Make the Earth Too Hot For Humans?
The Earth has experienced five mass extinctions before the one we are living through now, each so complete a slate-wiping of the evolutionary record it functioned as a resetting of the planetary clock, and many climate scientists will tell you they are the best analog for the ecological future we are diving headlong into. Unless you are a teenager, you probably read in your high-school textbooks that these extinctions were the result of asteroids. In fact, all but the one that killed the dinosaurs were caused by climate change produced by greenhouse gas. The most notorious was 252 million years ago; it began when carbon warmed the planet by five degrees, accelerated when that warming triggered the release of methane in the Arctic, and ended with 97 percent of all life on Earth dead. We are currently adding carbon to the atmosphere at a considerably faster rate; by most estimates, at least ten times faster.
climate  future  grim  climate-change  extinction  earth  carbon  anthropocene 
july 2017 by jm
Facebook scuppers Admiral Insurance plan to base premiums on your posts
Well, this is amazingly awful:
The Guardian claims to have further details of the kind of tell-tale signs that Admiral's algorithmic analysis would have looked out for in Facebook posts. Good traits include "writing in short concrete sentences, using lists, and arranging to meet friends at a set time and place, rather than just 'tonight'." On the other hand, "evidence that the Facebook user might be overconfident—such as the use of exclamation marks and the frequent use of 'always' or 'never' rather than 'maybe'—will count against them."


The future is shitty.
insurance  facebook  scoring  computer-says-no  algorithms  text-analysis  awful  future 
november 2016 by jm
Hey Microsoft, the Internet Made My Bot Racist, Too
All machine learning algorithms strive to exaggerate and perpetuate the past. That is, after all, what they are learning from. The fundamental assumption of every machine learning algorithm is that the past is correct, and anything coming in the future will be, and should be, like the past. This is a fine assumption to make when you are Netflix trying to predict what movie you’ll like, but is immoral when applied to many other situations. For bots like mine and Microsoft’s, built for entertainment purposes, it can lead to embarrassment. But AI has started to be used in much more meaningful ways: predictive policing in Chicago, for example, has already led to widespread accusations of racial profiling.
This isn’t a little problem. This is a huge problem, and it demands a lot more attention then it’s getting now, particularly in the community of scientists and engineers who design and apply these algorithms. It’s one thing to get cursed out by an AI, but wholly another when one puts you in jail, denies you a mortgage, or decides to audit you.
machine-learning  ml  algorithms  future  society  microsoft 
march 2016 by jm
DeepMind founder Demis Hassabis on how AI will shape the future | The Verge
Good interview with Demis Hassabis on DeepMind, AlphaGo and AI:
I’d like to see AI-assisted science where you have effectively AI research assistants that do a lot of the drudgery work and surface interesting articles, find structure in vast amounts of data, and then surface that to the human experts and scientists who can make quicker breakthroughs. I was giving a talk at CERN a few months ago; obviously they create more data than pretty much anyone on the planet, and for all we know there could be new particles sitting on their massive hard drives somewhere and no-one’s got around to analyzing that because there’s just so much data. So I think it’d be cool if one day an AI was involved in finding a new particle.
ai  deepmind  google  alphago  demis-hassabis  cern  future  machine-learning 
march 2016 by jm
Inside China's Memefacturing Factories, Where The Hottest New Gadgets Are Made - BuzzFeed News
On a humid afternoon, Zhou went shopping for some of those very parts at a Bao An market. As he pulled his maroon minivan into a crowded parking lot, the full scale of Depu Electronics came into view: a three-story concrete behemoth roughly bigger than a Costco and roughly smaller than the Pentagon. Inside, it looked like the world’s largest Radio Shack going out of business sale: an endless series of booths with cables and circuit boards and plugs and ports and buttons and machines piled so high on tables that the faces of the clerks who were selling them were hidden from view. Each booth seemed to argue: We have exactly what you want and we have enough of it for all of your customers. Short of motorized wheels and molding, the market offered nearly everything an ambitious factory owner would need to build a hoverboard, just waiting to be bought, assembled, and shipped.
hoverboards  memes  china  manufacturing  future  gadgets  tat  bao-an  electronics 
november 2015 by jm
Our Generation Ships Will Sink / Boing Boing
Kim Stanley Robinson on the feasibility of interstellar colonization: 'There is no Planet B! Earth is our only possible home!'
earth  future  kim-stanley-robinson  sf  space 
november 2015 by jm
Pinboard on the Next Economy Conference (with tweets)
Maciej Ceglowski went to an O'Reilly SV-boosterish conference and produced these excellent tweets
twitter  conferences  oreilly  silicon-valley  new-economy  future  lyft  uber  unions  maciej-ceglowski 
november 2015 by jm
Red lines and no-go zones - the coming surveillance debate
The Anderson Report to the House of Lords in the UK on RIPA introduces a concept of a "red line":
"Firm limits must also be written into the law: not merely safeguards, but red lines that may not be crossed." …   
"Some might find comfort in a world in which our every interaction and movement could be recorded, viewed in real time and indefinitely retained for possible future use by the authorities. Crime fighting, security, safety or public health justifications are never hard to find." [13.19] 

The Report then gives examples, such as a perpetual video feed from every room in every house, the police undertaking to view the record only on receipt of a complaint; blanket drone-based surveillance; licensed service providers, required as a condition of the licence to retain within the jurisdiction a complete plain-text version of every communication to be made available to the authorities on request; a constant data feed from vehicles, domestic appliances and health-monitoring personal devices; fitting of facial recognition software to every CCTV camera and the insertion of a location-tracking chip under every individual's skin.

It goes on:
"The impact of such powers on the innocent could be mitigated by the usual apparatus of safeguards, regulators and Codes of Practice. But a country constructed on such a basis would surely be intolerable to many of its inhabitants. A state that enjoyed all those powers would be truly totalitarian, even if the authorities had the best interests of its people at heart." [13.20] …  

"The crucial objection is that of principle. Such a society would have gone beyond Bentham's Panopticon (whose inmates did not know they were being watched) into a world where constant surveillance was a certainty and quiescence the inevitable result. There must surely come a point (though it comes at different places for different people) where the escalation of intrusive powers becomes too high a price to pay for a safer and more law abiding environment." [13.21]
panopticon  jeremy-bentham  law  uk  dripa  ripa  surveillance  spying  police  drones  facial-recognition  future  tracking  cctv  crime 
november 2015 by jm
Twins denied driver’s permit because DMV can’t tell them apart
"The computer can recognize faces, a feature that comes in handy if somebody’s is trying to get an illegal ID. It apparently is not programmed to detect twins."

As Hilary Mason put it: "You do not want to be an edge case in this future we are building."
future  grim  bugs  twins  edge-cases  coding  fail  dmv  software  via:hmason 
october 2015 by jm
It’s Not Climate Change — It’s Everything Change
now this is a Long Read. the inimitable Margaret Atwood on climate change, beautifully illustrated
climate  climate-change  margaret-atwood  long-reads  change  life  earth  green  future 
july 2015 by jm
The Agency - NYTimes.com
Russia's troll farms. Ladies and gentlemen -- the future
future  abuse  trolls  russia  trolling  politics  social-media  twitter  facebook 
june 2015 by jm
How the NSA Converts Spoken Words Into Searchable Text - The Intercept
This hits the nail on the head, IMO:
To Phillip Rogaway, a professor of computer science at the University of California, Davis, keyword-search is probably the “least of our problems.” In an email to The Intercept, Rogaway warned that “When the NSA identifies someone as ‘interesting’ based on contemporary NLP methods, it might be that there is no human-understandable explanation as to why beyond: ‘his corpus of discourse resembles those of others whom we thought interesting'; or the conceptual opposite: ‘his discourse looks or sounds different from most people’s.' If the algorithms NSA computers use to identify threats are too complex for humans to understand, it will be impossible to understand the contours of the surveillance apparatus by which one is judged.  All that people will be able to do is to try your best to behave just like everyone else.”
privacy  security  gchq  nsa  surveillance  machine-learning  liberty  future  speech  nlp  pattern-analysis  cs 
may 2015 by jm
J. G. Ballard predicted social media in a 1977 essay for Vogue
'In the intro essay to High Rise it says that J G Ballard predicted social media in a 1977 essay for Vogue. Here it is'
j-g-ballard  social-media  twitter  instagram  youtube  future  society  vogue  1977  facebook  media 
april 2015 by jm
Chinese authorities compromise millions in cyberattacks
"[The] Great Firewall [of China] has switched from being a passive, inbound filter to being an active and aggressive outbound one."
china  great-firewall  censorship  cyberwarfare  github  ddos  baidu  future 
march 2015 by jm
In Ukraine, Tomorrow’s Drone War Is Alive Today
Drones, hackerspaces and crowdfunding:
The most sophisticated UAV that has come out of the Ukrainian side since the start of the conflict is called the PD-1 from developer Igor Korolenko. It has a wingspan of nearly 10 feet, a five-hour flight time, carries electro-optical and infrared sensors as well as a video camera that broadcasts on a 128 bit encrypted channel. Its most important feature is the autopilot software that allows the drone to return home in the event that the global positioning system link is jammed or lost.

Drone-based intelligence gathering is often depicted as risk-free compared to manned aircraft or human intelligence gathering, but, says Korolenko, if the drone isn’t secure or the signature is too obvious, the human coasts can be very, very high.

“Russian military sometimes track locations of ground control stations,” he wrote Defense One in an email. “Therefore UAV squads have to follow certain security measures - to relocate frequently, to move out antennas and work from shelter, etc. As far as I know, two members of UAV squads were killed from mortar attacks after [their] positions were tracked by Russian electronic warfare equipment.”


(via bldgblog)
via:bldgblog  war  drones  uav  future  ukraine  russia  tech  aircraft  pd-1  crowdfunding 
march 2015 by jm
Japan's Robot Dogs Get Funerals as Sony Looks Away
in July 2014, [Sony's] repairs [of Aibo robot dogs] stopped and owners were left to look elsewhere for help. The Sony stiff has led not only to the formation of support groups--where Aibo enthusiasts can share tips and help each other with repairs--but has fed the bionic pet vet industry.

“The people who have them feel their presence and personality,” Nobuyuki Narimatsu, director of A-Fun, a repair company for robot dogs, told AFP. “So we think that somehow, they really have souls.” While concerted repair efforts have kept many an Aibo alive, a shortage of spare parts means that some of their lives have come to an end.
sony  aibo  robots  japan  dogs  pets  weird  future  badiotday  iot  gadgets 
march 2015 by jm
Coining "Dysguria"
“dysaguria” is the perfect noun, and “dysagurian” is the perfect adjective, to describe the eponymous company in Dave Eggers’ The Circle. It’s not in the same league as Orwell, or Huxley, or Bradbury, or Burgess. But it does raise very important questions about what could possibly go wrong if one company controlled all the world’s information. In the novel, the company operates according to the motto “all that happens must be known”; and one of its bosses, Eamon Bailey, encourages everywoman employee Mae Holland to live an always-on (clear, transparent) life according the maxims “secrets are lies”, “sharing is caring”, and “privacy is theft”. Eggers’s debts to dystopian fiction are apparent. But, whereas writers like Orwell, Huxley, Bradbury, and Burgess were concerned with totalitarian states, Eggers is concerned with a totalitarian company. However, the noun “dystopia” and the adjective “dystopian” – perfect though they are for the terror of military/security authoritarianism in 1984, or Brave new World, or Farenheit 451, or A Clockwork Orange – do not to my mind encapsulate the nightmare of industrial/corporate tyranny in The Circle. On the other hand, “dysaguria” as a noun and “dysagurian” as an adjective, in my view really do capture the essence of that “frightening company”.
dysaguria  dystopia  future  sf  authoritarianism  surveillance  the-circle  google  facebook 
february 2015 by jm
Madhumita Venkataramanan: My identity for sale (Wired UK)
If the data aggregators know everything about you -- including biometric data, healthcare history, where you live, where you work, what you do at the weekend, what medicines you take, etc. -- and can track you as an individual, does it really matter that they don't know your _name_? They legally track, and sell, everything else.
As the data we generate about ourselves continues to grow exponentially, brokers and aggregators are moving on from real-time profiling -- they're cross-linking data sets to predict our future behaviour. Decisions about what we see and buy and sign up for aren't made by us any more; they were made long before. The aggregate of what's been collected about us previously -- which is near impossible for us to see in its entirety -- defines us to companies we've never met. What I am giving up without consent, then, is not just my anonymity, but also my right to self-determination and free choice. All I get to keep is my name.
wired  privacy  data-aggregation  identity-theft  future  grim  biometrics  opt-out  healthcare  data  data-protection  tracking 
november 2014 by jm
Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied on a Whole City
The law-enforcement pervasive-surveillance CCTV PVR.
In a secret test of mass surveillance technology, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department sent a civilian aircraft* over Compton, California, capturing high-resolution video of everything that happened inside that 10-square-mile municipality. Compton residents weren't told about the spying, which happened in 2012. "We literally watched all of Compton during the times that we were flying, so we could zoom in anywhere within the city of Compton and follow cars and see people," Ross McNutt of Persistence Surveillance Systems told the Center for Investigative Reporting, which unearthed and did the first reporting on this important story. The technology he's trying to sell to police departments all over America can stay aloft for up to six hours. Like Google Earth, it enables police to zoom in on certain areas. And like TiVo, it permits them to rewind, so that they can look back and see what happened anywhere they weren't watching in real time. 


(via New Aesthetic)
pvr  cctv  law-enforcement  police  compton  los-angeles  law  surveillance  future 
april 2014 by jm
Life on Mars: Irish man signs up for colony mission
Last week, a private space exploration company called Mars One announced that it has shortlisted 1,058 people from 200,000 applicants who wanted to travel to Mars. Roche is the only Irishman on the list. The catch? If he goes, he can never come back.


Mad stuff. Works at the Science Gallery, so a co-worker of a friend, to boot
science-gallery  dublin  ireland  mars-one  mars  one-way-trips  exploration  future  space  science  joseph-roche 
january 2014 by jm
Reflected hidden faces in photographs revealed in pupil
The pupil of the eye in a photograph of a face can be mined for hidden information, such as reflected faces of the photographer and bystanders, according to research led by Dr. Rob Jenkins, of the Department of Psychology at the University of York and published in PLOS ONE (open access).


(via Waxy)
via:waxy  future  zoom-and-enhance  privacy  photography  eyes  photos 
december 2013 by jm
How Advanced Is the NSA's Cryptanalysis — And Can We Resist It?
Bruce Schneier's suggestions:
Assuming the hypothetical NSA breakthroughs don’t totally break public-cryptography — and that’s a very reasonable assumption — it’s pretty easy to stay a few steps ahead of the NSA by using ever-longer keys. We’re already trying to phase out 1024-bit RSA keys in favor of 2048-bit keys. Perhaps we need to jump even further ahead and consider 3072-bit keys. And maybe we should be even more paranoid about elliptic curves and use key lengths above 500 bits.

One last blue-sky possibility: a quantum computer. Quantum computers are still toys in the academic world, but have the theoretical ability to quickly break common public-key algorithms — regardless of key length — and to effectively halve the key length of any symmetric algorithm. I think it extraordinarily unlikely that the NSA has built a quantum computer capable of performing the magnitude of calculation necessary to do this, but it’s possible. The defense is easy, if annoying: stick with symmetric cryptography based on shared secrets, and use 256-bit keys.
bruce-schneier  cryptography  wired  nsa  surveillance  snooping  gchq  cryptanalysis  crypto  future  key-lengths 
september 2013 by jm
3D-Printer Manufacturer Creates Software Filter To Prevent Firearm Printing
'[Create It REAL], which sells 3D printer component parts and software, recently announced that it has come up with a firearm component detection algorithm that will give 3D printers the option to block any gun parts. The software compares each component a user is trying to print with a database of potential firearms parts, and shuts down the modeling software if it senses the user is trying to make a gun.'
blocklists  filtering  guns  weapons  3d-printing  future  firearms 
july 2013 by jm
3-D Printer Brings Dexterity To Children With No Fingers
'A South African man who lost part of his hand in a home carpentry accident and an American puppeteer he met via YouTube have teamed up to make 3D-printable hands for children who have no fingers. So far, over 100 children have been given "robohands" for free, and a simplified version released just yesterday snaps together like LEGO bricks and costs just $5 in materials.'

This is incredible. Check out the video of Liam and his robohand in action: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kB53-D_N8Uc
3d-printing  3d  makers  robohands  hands  prosthetics  future  youtube  via:gruverja 
june 2013 by jm
Double vision: seeing both sides of Syria’s war
A skirmish is filmed, using HD video cameras, by both sides. Storyful pinpoint the location. War as panopticon
storyful  war  syria  future  tanks  battle  video  youtube  hd  panopticon 
march 2013 by jm
The world’s first 3D-printed gun
I wasn't expecting to see this for a few years. The future is ahead of schedule!

A .22-caliber pistol, formed from a 3D-printed AR-15 (M16) lower receiver, and a normal, commercial upper. In other words, the main body of the gun is plastic, while the chamber — where the bullets are actually struck — is solid metal. [...]

While this pistol obviously wasn’t created from scratch using a 3D printer, the interesting thing is that the lower receiver — in a legal sense at least — is what actually constitutes a firearm. Without a lower receiver, the gun would not work; thus, the receiver is the actual legally-controlled part. In short, this means that people without gun licenses — or people who have had their licenses revoked — could print their own lower receiver and build a complete, off-the-books gun. What a chilling thought.
via:peakscale  guns  scary  future  grim-meathook-future  3d-printing  thingiverse  weapons 
july 2012 by jm
I've been playing the same game of Civilization II for almost 10 years. This is the result.
Epic Reddit post. "Parallels to '1984' off the top of my head: 3 superpowers, a "communist" leadership in which technology has reached as far as it needs to go (end of technology tree), barbarian (resistance) uprisings constantly being stomped out by the totalitarian government, nuclear war rendering most farmland useless, constant breaking and reassembling of treaties between the 3 superpowers, seemingly infinite war (due to the previous point), an ever present and all knowing leader making the decisions of the nation..." (via oceanclub)
via:oceanclub  gaming  games  civ  sid-meier  1984  politics  war  future  strategy 
june 2012 by jm
Jamming Tripoli: Inside Moammar Gadhafi's Secret Surveillance Network
The very scary future of state control, censorship, and totalitarianism in the age of the internet. A presentation from Amesys, a subsidiary of Bull S.A. "explained the significance of Eagle to a government seeking to control activities inside its borders. Warning of an “increasing need of high-level intelligence in the constant struggle against criminals and terrorism,” the document touted Eagle’s ability to capture bulk Internet traffic passing through conventional, satellite, and mobile phone networks, and then to store that data in a filterable and searchable database. This database, in turn, could be integrated with other sources of intelligence, such as phone recordings, allowing security personnel to pick through audio and data from a given person all at once, in real time or by historical time stamp. In other words, instead of choosing targets and monitoring them, officials could simply sweep up everything, sort it by time and target, and then browse through it later at their leisure. The title of the presentation -- ”From Lawful to Massive Interception” -- gestured at the vast difference between so-called lawful intercept (traditional law enforcement surveillance based on warrants for specific phone numbers or IP addresses) and what Amesys was offering."
massive-interception  future  state-control  censorship  privacy  internet  email  totalitarianism  libya  amesys  bull-sa  gadhafi  surveillance 
may 2012 by jm
Welcome to Life: the singularity, ruined by lawyers - YouTube
'some portions of the experience, such as the sky, may be replaced by personalised advertising.' Uploading your consciousness in the age of copyright maximalism, as Nelson Minar put it (via Nelson)
via:nelson  grim-meathook-future  future  singularity  funny  copyright  advertising 
may 2012 by jm
Spam-erican Apparel
'LifeSphere currently offers more than 90,000 unique products and is more than likely run by one person in a suburban bungalow in Phoenix. As far as I can gather their process consists of ALPHABETICALLY(!) applying every single image in the Public Domain photography archive to every object Zazzle offers. Amazingly almost everything they make is amazing. From doggy clothes featuring macrophotography of Chex Mix, to “Thanksgiving Shrimp” skateboard decks, LifeSphere proves 90,000 times over that rigorous process-based design yields infallibly fresh results.' (via Nelson)
bots  clothing  design  manufacturing  zazzle  on-demand  spam  new-aesthetic  future 
may 2012 by jm
First Music Contact - Music3.0
'We talk a lot about what the world of music and artists will look like five or ten years from now. But for changes to happen then, the conversations need to happen now. We believe that the next big thing in music is not going to ever appear on a stage. After the record industry (music 1.0) and the live music industry (music 2.0), it's time to pay more attention to innovation (music 3.0) and what can come from constructively disrupting how the music industry operates.

It's time to open up the shop. It's time for unvested interests to see if they can use existing data and ecosystems to make a better music business. For far too long, music has been a conservative sector which views the influence of outside forces with abject suspicion and rank horror. Chalk this down to some bad experiences over the last 15 years due to misunderstandings with and ignorance of the tech and telecoms worlds. Chalk this down to rampant music industry egos which lead folks to believe no-one else can sell music bar music players. Chalk it down to fear of disruption.

So, it's time for change. You can't keep doing the same things in the same way and hope you won't make the same mistakes again. It's time to listen to and learn from smart people in other areas. It's time for people who have innovative ideas or even just the stirrings of innovative ideas to take stock from people who operate in other areas and who deal with ideas, technology and the valuable currency of innovation every single working day. It's time for some different talking which is going to lead to some very different make-and-do experiences.'

Looks excellent. (via Jim Carroll)
music  future  technology  internet  disruption  music-industry  ireland  via:jimcarroll 
april 2012 by jm
Gamasutra - News - Opinion: Minecraft And The Question Of Luck
'Notch’s luck was that he came across the idea of doing a first-person fortress building game. His alignment was that the game that he wanted to make was culturally connected to [he PC gamer] tribe. While the game may appear ugly, and its purchase process etc seem naive to many a gaming professional, all of those decisions that Notch made along the road to releasing his game were from the point of view of a particular perspective of what games are, what matters and what were the things that he could trust the tribe to figure out for themselves.'
tribes  viral  minecraft  gaming  analysis  games  culture  gamasutra  via:nelson  future  software  marketing  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
Man Lives In Futuristic Sci-Fi World Where All His Interactions Take Place In Cyberspace | The Onion
'In the blink of an eye, this real-life Johnny Mnemonic keys in his encrypted, top-secret passcode and enters the fortified binary area from which all his personal communiqués are sent forth in a dizzying array of ones and zeroes.' brilliant pisstake of mid-'90s tech journalism (via Walter Higgins)
the-onion  funny  future  futurism  humour  internet  sf  via:walter  journalism  cyberpunk  1990s  cyberspace  from delicious
august 2010 by jm
Thinkism
great Singularity contemplation from Kevin Kelly: 'to be useful, artificial intelligences have to be embodied in the world, and that world will often set their pace of innovations. Thinkism is not enough. Without conducting experiments, building prototypes, having failures, and engaging in reality, an intelligence can have thoughts but not results. It cannot think its way to solving the world's problems. There won't be instant discoveries the minute, hour, day or year a smarter-than-human AI appears. The rate of discovery will hopefully be significantly accelerated. Even better, a super AI will ask questions no human would ask. But, to take one example, it will require many generations of experiments on living organisms, not even to mention humans, before such a difficult achievement as immortality is gained.'
ai  singularity  ray-kurzweil  kevin-kelly  science  progress  technology  future  philosophy  intelligence  knowledge  thinkism 
july 2009 by jm

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