jm + forbes   4

Forbes on the skeleton crew nature of OpenSSL
This is a great point:
Obviously, those tending to the security protocols that support the rest of the Web need better infrastructure and more funding. “Large portions of the software infrastructure of the Internet are built and maintained by volunteers, who get little reward when their code works well but are blamed, and sometimes savagely derided, when it fails,” writes Foster in the New Yorker. [...] "money and support still tend to flow to the newest and sexiest projects, while boring but essential elements like OpenSSL limp along as volunteer efforts,” he writes. “It’s easy to take open-source software for granted, and to forget that the Internet we use every day depends in part on the freely donated work of thousands of programmers.”

We need to find ways to pay for work that is currently essentially donated freely. One promising project is Bithub, from Whisper Systems, where people who make valuable contributions to open source projects are rewarded (with Bitcoin of course). But the pool of Bitcoin is still donation based. The Internet has helped create a culture of free, but what we may need to recognize is that we get what we pay for. Well-funded companies pulling critical code from open source projects for their sites should have formal fee arrangements, rather than the volunteer group simply hoping these users will pony up some Benjamins for “prominent logo placement” on a website most people had never heard of before Heartbleed.
open-source  openssl  free  sponsorship  forbes  via:karl-whelan 
april 2014 by jm
How A 'Deviant' Philosopher Built Palantir, A CIA-Funded Data-Mining Juggernaut - Forbes
Palantir -- the free-market state-surveillance data-retention nightmare. At the end of this slightly overenthusiastic puff piece we get to:
Katz-Lacabe wasn’t impressed. Palantir’s software, he points out, has no default time limits -- all information remains searchable for as long as it’s stored on the customer’s servers. And its auditing function? “I don’t think it means a damn thing,” he says. “Logs aren’t useful unless someone is looking at them.” [...]

What if Palantir’s audit logs -- its central safeguard against abuse -- are simply ignored? Karp responds that the logs are intended to be read by a third party. In the case of government agencies, he suggests an oversight body that reviews all surveillance -- an institution that is purely theoretical at the moment. “Something like this will exist,” Karp insists. “Societies will build it, precisely because the alternative is letting terrorism happen or losing all our liberties.”

Palantir’s critics, unsurprisingly, aren’t reassured by Karp’s hypothetical court. Electronic Privacy Information Center activist Amie Stepanovich calls Palantir “naive” to expect the government to start policing its own use of technology. The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Lee Tien derides Karp’s argument that privacy safeguards can be added to surveillance systems after the fact. “You should think about what to do with the toxic waste while you’re building the nuclear power plant,” he argues, “not some day in the future.”
palantir  data-retention  privacy  surveillance  state  cia  forbes  andy-greenberg  eff  epic  snooping 
august 2013 by jm
Does Online Piracy Hurt The Economy? A Look At The Numbers - Forbes
'The data simply doesn’t suggest that piracy is causing any serious economic harm to the US economy or the entertainment industry. Heavy-handed approaches to preventing piracy are wrong-headed and reveal a dangerous level of short-term thinking on the part of both lawmakers and industry leaders. Worse, the impetus to crack down on piracy is based largely on industry data that wildly inflates the problem.'
piracy  forbes  filesharing  politics  sopa  economics  law 
january 2012 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: