jm + faa   3

The many human errors that brought down the Boeing 737 Max - The Verge
Had anyone [at the FAA] checked, they might have flagged MCAS for one of several reasons, including its lack of redundancy, its unacceptably high risk of failure, or its significant increase in power to the point that it was no longer just a “hazardous failure” kind of system.

When asked for comment, the agency said, “The FAA’s aircraft certification processes are well established and have consistently produced safe aircraft designs.”

Boeing defended the process as well. “The system of authorized representatives — delegated authority — is a robust and effective way for the FAA to execute its oversight of safety,” a spokesperson told The Verge.

But that system only works when someone actually reads the paperwork.
mcas  boeing  737max  fail  safety  faa  flying  regulation 
20 days ago by jm
Flawed analysis, failed oversight: How Boeing, FAA certified the suspect 737 MAX flight control system
omg this article is absolutely horrific. Boeing are in deep shit if this is borne out.
Like all 737s, the MAX actually has two of the sensors, one on each side of the fuselage near the cockpit. But the MCAS was designed to take a reading from only one of them.

Lemme said Boeing could have designed the system to compare the readings from the two vanes, which would have indicated if one of them was way off. Alternatively, the system could have been designed to check that the angle-of-attack reading was accurate while the plane was taxiing on the ground before takeoff, when the angle of attack should read zero.

“They could have designed a two-channel system. Or they could have tested the value of angle of attack on the ground,” said Lemme. “I don’t know why they didn’t.”

The black box data provided in the preliminary investigation report shows that readings from the two sensors differed by some 20 degrees not only throughout the flight but also while the airplane taxied on the ground before takeoff.
faa  aviation  boeing  737max  safety  fail  sensors  flight  crashes  mcas 
9 weeks ago by jm
Amazon's Drone Delivery Patent Just Feels Like Trolling At This Point
Oh dear, Amazon.
These aren’t actual technologies yet. [...] All of which underscores that Amazon might never ever ever ever actually implement delivery drones. The patent paperwork was filed nearly a year after Amazon’s splashy drone program reveal on 60 Minutes. At the time we called it revolutionary marketing because, you know, delivery drones are technical and logistical madness, not to mention that commercial drone use is illegal right now. Although, in fairness the FAA did just relax some rules so that Amazon could test drones.

At this point it feels like Amazon is just trolling. It’s trolling us with public relations BS about its future drones, and it’s trolling future competitors -- Google is also apparently working on this -- so that if somebody ever somehow does anything relating to drone delivery, Amazon can sue them. If I’m wrong, I’ll deliver my apology via Airmail.
amazon  trolling  patents  uspto  delivery  drones  uavs  competition  faa 
may 2015 by jm

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