jm + eyes   7

The mysterious syndrome impairing astronauts’ sight - The Washington Post
Visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome (VIIP) is named for the leading theory to explain it. On Earth, gravity pulls bodily fluids down toward the feet. That doesn’t happen in space, and it is thought that extra fluid in the skull increases pressure on the brain and the back of the eye.
viip  sight  eyes  space  zero-gravity  health 
july 2016 by jm
A Team of Biohackers Has Figured Out How to Inject Your Eyeballs With Night Vision
Did it work? Yes. It started with shapes, hung about 10 meters away. "I'm talking like the size of my hand," Licina says. Before long, they were able to do longer distances, recognizing symbols and identifying moving subjects against different backgrounds. "The other test, we had people go stand in the woods," he says. "At 50 meters, we could figure out where they were, even if they were standing up against a tree." Each time, Licina had a 100% success rate. The control group, without being dosed with Ce6, only got them right a third of the time.


Well, that's some risky biohacking. wow
biohacking  scary  night-vision  eyes  chlorin-e6  infravision  sfm 
march 2015 by jm
"Meta-Perceptual Helmets For The Dead Zoo"
with Neil McKenzie, Nov 9-16 2014, in the National History Museum in Dublin:

'These six helmets/viewing devices start off by exploring physical conditions of viewing: if we have two eyes, they why is our vision so limited? Why do we have so little perception of depth? Why don’t our two eyes offer us two different, complementary views of the world around us? Why can’t they extend from our body so we can see over or around things? Why don’t they allow us to look behind and in front at the same time, or sideways in both directions? Why can’t our two eyes simultaneously focus on two different tasks?

Looking through Michael Land’s defining work Animal Eyes, we see that nature has indeed explored all of these possibilities: a Hammerhead Shark has hyper-stereo vision; a horse sees 350° around itself; a chameleon has separately rotatable eyes…

The series of Meta-Perceptual Helmets do indeed explore these zoological typologies: proposing to humans the hyper-stereo vision of the hammerhead shark; or the wide peripheral vision of the horse; or the backward/forward vision of the chameleon… but they also take us into the unnatural world of mythology and literature: the Cheshire Cat Helmet is so called because of the strange lingering effect of dominating visual information such as a smile or the eyes; the Cyclops allows one large central eye to take in the world around while a second tiny hidden eye focuses on a close up task (why has the creature never evolved that can focus on denitting without constantly having to glance around?).'

(via Emma)
perception  helmets  dublin  ireland  museums  dead-zoo  sharks  eyes  vision  art 
october 2014 by jm
Reflected hidden faces in photographs revealed in pupil
The pupil of the eye in a photograph of a face can be mined for hidden information, such as reflected faces of the photographer and bystanders, according to research led by Dr. Rob Jenkins, of the Department of Psychology at the University of York and published in PLOS ONE (open access).


(via Waxy)
via:waxy  future  zoom-and-enhance  privacy  photography  eyes  photos 
december 2013 by jm
seeing into the UV spectrum after Cataract Surgery with Crystalens
I've been very happy so far with the Crystalens implant for Cataract Surgery [...] one unexpected/interesting aspect is I see a violet glow that others do not - perhaps I'm more sensitive to the low end of the visible light spectrum.


(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  science  perception  augmentation  uv  light  sight  cool  cataracts  surgery  lens  eyes 
june 2013 by jm
Your beautiful eyes
slightly disturbing extreme close-up shots of the human eye
eyes  freaky  ugh  iris  photography  macros  from delicious
january 2011 by jm

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