jm + experian   3

A Closer Look at Experian Big Data and Artificial Intelligence in Durham Police
'UK police bought profiling data for their artificial intelligence (AI) system, deciding whether to hold suspects in custody, from ... Experian.'

'The AI tool uses 34 data categories including the offender’s criminal history, combined with their age, gender and two types of residential postcode. The use of postcode data is problematic in predictive software of this kind as it carries a risk of perpetuating bias towards areas marked by community deprivation.'
experian  marketing  credit-score  data  policing  uk  durham  ai  statistics  crime  hart 
11 days ago by jm
Welcome to Algorithmic Prison - Bill Davidow - The Atlantic
"Computer says no", taken to the next level.
Even if an algorithmic prisoner knows he is in a prison, he may not know who his jailer is. Is he unable to get a loan because of a corrupted file at Experian or Equifax? Or could it be TransUnion? His bank could even have its own algorithms to determine a consumer’s creditworthiness. Just think of the needle-in-a-haystack effort consumers must undertake if they are forced to investigate dozens of consumer-reporting companies, looking for the one that threw them behind algorithmic bars. Now imagine a future that contains hundreds of such companies. A prisoner might not have any idea as to what type of behavior got him sentenced to a jail term. Is he on an enhanced screening list at an airport because of a trip he made to an unstable country, a post on his Facebook page, or a phone call to a friend who has a suspected terrorist friend?
privacy  data  big-data  algorithms  machine-learning  equifax  experian  consumer  society  bill-davidow 
february 2014 by jm
Experian Sold Consumer Data to ID Theft Service
This is what happens when you don't have strong controls on data protection/data privacy -- the US experience.
While [posing as a US-based private investigator] may have gotten the [Vietnam-based gang operating the massive identity fraud site Superget.info] past Experian and/or CourtVentures’ screening process, according to Martin there were other signs that should have alerted Experian to potential fraud associated with the account. For example, Martin said the Secret Service told him that the alleged proprietor of Superget.info had paid Experian for his monthly data access charges using wire transfers sent from Singapore.

“The issue in my mind was the fact that this went on for almost a year after Experian did their due diligence and purchased” Court Ventures, Martin said. “Why didn’t they question cash wires coming in every month? Experian portrays themselves as the data-breach experts, and they sell identity theft protection services. How this could go on without them detecting it I don’t know. Our agreement with them was that our information was to be used for fraud prevention and ID verification, and was only to be sold to licensed and credentialed U.S. businesses, not to someone overseas.”


via Simon McGarr
via:tupp_ed  privacy  security  crime  data-protection  data-privacy  experian  data-breaches  courtventures  superget  scams  fraud  identity  identity-theft 
october 2013 by jm

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