jm + excel   10

One in five genetics papers contains errors thanks to Microsoft Excel | Science | AAAS
'Autoformatting in Microsoft Excel has caused many a headache — but now, a new study shows that one in five genetics papers in top scientific journals contains errors from the program, The Washington Post reports. The errors often arose when gene names in a spreadsheet were automatically changed to calendar dates or numerical values.'
science  microsoft  excel  spreadsheets  autoformatting  clippy  fail  papers  genetics 
28 days ago by jm
Falsehoods Programmers Believe About CSVs
Much of my professional work for the last 10+ years has revolved around handing, importing and exporting CSV files. CSV files are frustratingly misunderstood, abused, and most of all underspecified. While RFC4180 exists, it is far from definitive and goes largely ignored.

Partially as a companion piece to my recent post about how CSV is an encoding nightmare, and partially an expression of frustration, I've decided to make a list of falsehoods programmers believe about CSVs. I recommend my previous post for a more in-depth coverage on the pains of CSVs encodings and how the default tooling (Excel) will ruin your day.


(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  csv  excel  programming  coding  apis  data  encoding  transfer  falsehoods  fail  rfc4180 
january 2017 by jm
How to Quantify Scalability
good page on the Universal Scalability Law and how to apply it
usl  performance  scalability  concurrency  capacity  measurement  excel  equations  metrics 
september 2016 by jm
_What We Know About Spreadsheet Errors_ [paper]
As we will see below, there has long been ample evidence that errors in spreadsheets are pandemic. Spreadsheets, even after careful development, contain errors in one percent or more of all formula cells. In large spreadsheets with thousands of formulas, there will be dozens of undetected errors. Even significant errors may go undetected because formal testing in spreadsheet development is rare and because even serious errors may not be apparent.
business  coding  maths  excel  spreadsheets  errors  formulas  error-rate 
october 2015 by jm
A Virtual Machine in Excel
'Ádám was trying his hand at a problem in Excel, but the official rules prohibit the use of Excel macros. In a daze, he came up with one of the most clever uses of Excel: building an assembly interpreter with the most popular spreadsheet program. This is a virtual Harvard architecture machine without writable RAM; the stack is only lots and lots of IFs.'
vms  excel  hacks  spreadsheets  coding 
december 2014 by jm
You probably shouldn’t use a spreadsheet for important work
Daniel Lemire comments on the recent cases of bugs in spreadsheets causing major impact:
There are several critical problems with a tool like Excel that need to be widely known:

* Spreadsheets do not support testing. For anything that matters, you should validate and test your code automatically and systematically;

* Spreadsheets make code reviews impractical. To visually inspect the code, you need to click and each and every cell. In practice, this means that you cannot reasonably ask someone to read over your formulas to make sure that there is no mistake;

* Spreadsheets encourage redundancies. Spreadsheets encourage copy-and-paste. Though copying and pasting is sometimes the right tool, it also creates redundancies. These redundancies make it very difficult to update a spreadsheet: are you absolutely sure that you have changed the formula throughout?


Agreed on all three, particularly on the impossibility of testing. IMO, everyone who may be in a job where automation via spreadsheet is likely, needs training in SDE fundamentals: unit testing, the important of open source and open data for reproducibility, version control, and code review. We are all computer scientists now.
spreadsheets  excel  coding  errors  bugs  testability  unit-testing  testing  quality  sde  sde-fundamentals  dry 
april 2013 by jm
The Excel Depression - NYTimes.com
Krugman on the Reinhart-Rogoff Excel-bug fiasco.
What the Reinhart-Rogoff affair shows is the extent to which austerity has been sold on false pretenses. For three years, the turn to austerity has been presented not as a choice but as a necessity. Economic research, austerity advocates insisted, showed that terrible things happen once debt exceeds 90 percent of G.D.P. But “economic research” showed no such thing; a couple of economists made that assertion, while many others disagreed. Policy makers abandoned the unemployed and turned to austerity because they wanted to, not because they had to. So will toppling Reinhart-Rogoff from its pedestal change anything? I’d like to think so. But I predict that the usual suspects will just find another dubious piece of economic analysis to canonize, and the depression will go on and on.
paul-krugman  economics  excel  coding  bugs  software  austerity  debt 
april 2013 by jm
Excel, untestability, and the reliability of quants
Wow, this is a great software-quality story -- I knew Excel was the most widely used programming environment out there, but this is a factor I'd overlooked:

In his remarks on the final panel, Frank Partnoy mentioned something I missed when it came out a few weeks ago: the role of Microsoft Excel in the “London Whale” trading debacle. [..] To summarize: JPMorgan’s Chief Investment Office needed a new value-at-risk (VaR) model for the synthetic credit portfolio (the one that blew up) and assigned a quantitative whiz [...] to create it. The new model “operated through a series of Excel spreadsheets, which had to be completed manually, by a process of copying and pasting data from one spreadsheet to another.” The internal Model Review Group identified this problem as well as a few others, but approved the model, while saying that it should be automated and another significant flaw should be fixed. After the London Whale trade blew up, the Model Review Group discovered that the model had not been automated and found several other errors. Most spectacularly, “After subtracting the old rate from the new rate, the spreadsheet divided by their sum instead of their average, as the modeler had intended. This error likely had the effect of muting volatility by a factor of two and of lowering the VaR ...”

I write periodically about the perils of bad software in the business world in general and the financial industry in particular, by which I usually mean back-end enterprise software that is poorly designed, insufficiently tested, and dangerously error-prone. But this is something different. [...] While Excel the program is reasonably robust, the spreadsheets that people create with Excel are incredibly fragile. There is no way to trace where your data come from, there’s no audit trail (so you can overtype numbers and not know it), and there’s no easy way to test spreadsheets, for starters. The biggest problem is that anyone can create Excel spreadsheets -- badly. Because it’s so easy to use, the creation of even important spreadsheets is not restricted to people who understand programming and do it in a methodical, well-documented way.

This is why the JPMorgan VaR model is the rule, not the exception: manual data entry, manual copy-and-paste, and formula errors. This is another important reason why you should pause whenever you hear that banks’ quantitative experts are smarter than Einstein, or that sophisticated risk management technology can protect banks from blowing up. At the end of the day, it’s all software. While all software breaks occasionally, Excel spreadsheets break all the time. But they don’t tell you when they break: they just give you the wrong number.
excel  reliability  software  coding  ides  jpmorgan  value-at-risk  finance  london-whale  quants  spreadsheets  unit-tests  testability  testing 
april 2013 by jm
Austerity policies founded on Excel typo
You've probably heard that countries with a high debt:GDP ratio suffer from slow economic growth. The specific number 90 percent has been invoked frequently. That's all thanks to a study conducted by Carmen Reinhardt and Kenneth Rogoff for their book This Time It's Different. But the results have been difficult for other researchers to replicate. Now three scholars at the University of Massachusetts have done so in "Does High Public Debt Consistently Stifle Economic Growth? A Critique of Reinhart and Rogoff" and they find that the Reinhart/Rogoff result is based on opportunistic exclusion of Commonwealth data in the late-1940s, a debatable premise about how to weight the data, and most of all a sloppy Excel coding error.

Read Mike Konczal for the whole rundown, but I'll just focus on the spreadsheet part. At one point they set cell L51 equal to AVERAGE(L30:L44) when the correct procuedure was AVERAGE(L30:L49). By typing wrong, they accidentally left Denmark, Canada, Belgium, Austria, and Australia out of the average. When you run the math correctly "the average real GDP growth rate for countries carrying a public debt-to-GDP ratio of over 90 percent is actually 2.2 percent, not -0.1 percent."
austerity  politics  excel  coding  errors  bugs  spreadsheets  economics  economy 
april 2013 by jm
Arena.Xlsm is an RPG made by an accountant and played entirely in Microsoft Excel • News • PC • Eurogamer.net
What do you get if you take one accountant with "a fondness for spreadsheets, finance and business" and mix with "a life-long passion for video games"?
Well it's obvious isn't it? A turn-based RPG made and played entirely in Microsoft Excel.


(via Paul Moloney)
via:oceanclub  arena.xlsm  excel  spreadsheets  games  gaming  rpg 
april 2013 by jm

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