jm + eu   93

European Commission study finds no link between piracy and lower sales of digital content
According to the report, an average of 51% of adults and 72% of minors in the EU have pirated digital content, with Poland and Spain averaging the highest rates of all countries surveyed. Nevertheless, displacement rates (the impact of piracy on legitimate sales) were found to be negligible or non-existent for music, books and games, while rates for films and TV were in line with previous digital piracy studies.

Most interesting is the fact that the study found that illegal game downloads actually lead to an increase in legal purchases. The report concludes that tactics like video game microtransactions are proving effective in converting illegal users to paying users.

The full report goes in-depth regarding potential factors influencing piracy and the challenges of accurately tracking its impact on legitimate sales, but the researchers ultimately conclude that there is no robust statistical evidence that illegal downloads reduce legal sales. That's big news, which makes it all the more troubling that the EU effectively buried it for two years.
piracy  eu  studies  downloads  ec  games  movies  books  content 
26 days ago by jm
Dark forces, Brexit and Irexit
The EU have made it clear, as they have to, that there will be no frictionless borders between the union and the UK. Brexit will be dislocative.  As smaller irish companies start to go to the wall post Brexit expect the calls for “something to be done” to start to include Irexit [an Irish exit from the EU a la Brexit]. But this way madness lies. [...]

we export more in education services than in beverages ; we exportthree times or more manufactured goods than food; we export six times more in chemicals and related; value added by industry or by distribution and transport is more than 10 times that of agriculture. Seeking Irexit on the basis that it would be good for agribusiness is seeking to amputate a hand for a broken finger.
agribusiness  ireland  irexit  brexit  economics  eu  politics 
11 weeks ago by jm
Amazon Global Product Price Check
price compare across global Amazon sites, by ASIN. there are some major differences
prices  amazon  via:its  price-check  comparison  shopping  eu  uk  asin 
july 2017 by jm
GDPR Advisors and Consultants - Data Compliance Europe
Simon McGarr's new consultancy:
Our consultancy helps our clients understand how EU privacy law applies to their organisations; delivers the practical and concrete steps needed to achieve legal compliance; and helps them manage their continuing obligations after GDPR comes into force. Our structured approach to GDPR provides a long-term data compliance framework to minimise the ongoing risk of potential fines for data protection breaches. Our continuing partnership provides regulator liaison, advisory consultancy, and external Data Protection Officer services.
gdpr  simon-mcgarr  law  privacy  eu  europe  data-protection  regulation  data 
may 2017 by jm
May's Brexit plan is falling apart and the press are talking about Easter eggs
Now the prime minister has embroiled herself in a negotiation in which we are at a disadvantage in terms of time and negotiating capacity. There will of course be no admission from Brexit MPs about this. They fixate on the one prediction economists got wrong - the surprising resilience of consumer spending - while ignoring everything their side was wrong about, like the fall in sterling, the announcement of a second Scottish independence referendum, the threat of a sudden hard border in Ireland or the crisis over Gibraltar.

This is not point scoring. Unless there is a sober assessment of what is going right and wrong on both sides there can be no realistic negotiating posture. We are condemned to keep making the same mistakes again and again and working ourselves into ever-more disadvantageous positions.
eu  politics  brexit  uk  fail  theresa-may 
april 2017 by jm
[1606.08813] European Union regulations on algorithmic decision-making and a "right to explanation"
We summarize the potential impact that the European Union's new General Data Protection Regulation will have on the routine use of machine learning algorithms. Slated to take effect as law across the EU in 2018, it will restrict automated individual decision-making (that is, algorithms that make decisions based on user-level predictors) which "significantly affect" users. The law will also effectively create a "right to explanation," whereby a user can ask for an explanation of an algorithmic decision that was made about them. We argue that while this law will pose large challenges for industry, it highlights opportunities for computer scientists to take the lead in designing algorithms and evaluation frameworks which avoid discrimination and enable explanation.


oh this'll be tricky.
algorithms  accountability  eu  gdpr  ml  machine-learning  via:daveb  europe  data-protection  right-to-explanation 
march 2017 by jm
Commentary: The ‘Irish’ Startup Attribution Problem
Why don't Irish tech startup activity show up on a EU-wide comparisons? Turns out we tend to transition to a US-based model, with US-based management and EU-based operations and engineering, like $work does:
Successful Irish tech companies have a skewed geographic profile. This presents a data gathering problem for the data companies but its also a strong indicator of the market reality for Irish startups. The size of the local market and a focus on software business in particular means many Irish startups are transitioning to the US (some earlier and with more commitment than others), and getting backed by a spectrum of local and international VCs.


Correcting for this put Ireland's tech venture investment in the second half of 2014 at $125m, midway between Sweden and Finland, 8th in Europe overall.
ireland  tech  startups  investment  vc  europe  eu 
december 2016 by jm
Stephen Coutts – Irexit by Default? The Maintenance of Open Borders and Constitutional Realignment in the event of a hard Brexit
This is the new fear -- that FF/FG will accidentally and stupidly disengage Ireland from the EU as a side effect of trying to keep the UK happy and cross-border trade intact
trade  customs  borders  uk  brexit  imports  ireland  eu 
october 2016 by jm
We are witnessing nothing less than a Tory reformation | Rafael Behr | Opinion | The Guardian
An excellent explanation of what is going on in the UK right now. What a nightmare:
Finally there are the self-styled buccaneers of the free-trade seas. Boris Johnson would probably cast himself as Sir Walter Raleigh – polymath, wordsmith, adventurer. That leaves Liam Fox to play Sir Francis Drake, looking for domestic glory in global circumnavigation but seen from abroad as a pirate.

This is all myth and fantasy, of course. But parties have always been sustained by internal mythologies, and the task of exiting the EU is so complicated and fraught with danger that fantasy becomes a necessary comfort. As one former minister says of the puritan choristers: “They have spent their lives working towards this dream. Of course they don’t want to accept that it’s a nightmare.”

Tory pro-Europeans are in the impossible position of using rational argument against faith. If they counsel compromise on migration or the single market, they are accused of talking Britain down or trying to refight the referendum. They have few reinforcements across the political water. Labour is a shambles. The Lib Dems are puny in parliament. Scotland has its own distinct politics, and in Nicola Sturgeon its own remainian queen with her own independence agenda.

The Tories do not speak for all of England, but in the absence of credible opposition they feel as if they do, and will act accordingly. To those millions who did not vote to leave the EU, the message is clear: you are free to pray for whatever you like. Your antique rites will be tolerated. But do not expect your concerns to be represented in the court of Queen Theresa. Be humble instead. Swallow your doubts and take a pew in the reformed national church of Brexit.
reformation  uk  politics  brexit  eu  puritanism  fanaticism 
october 2016 by jm
'If you've got money, you vote in ... if you haven't got money, you vote out' | Politics | The Guardian
The prime minister evidently thought that the whole debate could be cleanly started and finished in a matter of months. His Eton contemporary Boris Johnson – and, really, can you believe that the political story of the last four months has effectively been a catastrophic contest between two people who went to the same exclusive school? – opportunistically embraced the cause of Brexit in much the same spirit. What they had not figured out was that a diffuse, scattershot popular anger had not yet decisively found a powerful enough outlet, but that the staging of a referendum and the cohering of the leave cause would deliver exactly that. Ukip were held back by both the first-past-the-post electoral system, and the polarising qualities of Farage, but the coalition for Brexit effectively neutralised both. And so it came to pass: the cause of leaving the EU, for so long the preserve of cranks and chancers, attracted a share of the popular vote for which any modern political party would give its eye teeth.
brexit  europe  eu  uk  eton  ukip  politics 
june 2016 by jm
There are liars and then there’s Boris Johnson and Michael Gove
Post-brexit post-mortem from Nicholas Cohen in the grauniad:
The Vote Leave campaign followed the tactics of the sleazy columnist to the letter. First, it came out with the big, bold solution: leave. Then it dismissed all who raised well-founded worries with “the country is sick of experts”. Then, like Johnson the journalist, it lied.
eu  politics  uk  brexit  boris-johnson  michael-gove 
june 2016 by jm
Terrorism and internet blocking – is this the most ridiculous amendment ever? - EDRi
So, there you have it: Blocking is necessary, except it is not. Safeguards need to be implemented, except they don’t need to be. This approach is legal, except it isn’t. The text is based on the Child Exploitation Directive, except it isn’t. Is this really how we are going to create credible legislation on terrorism?
edri  blocking  internet  censorship  eu  ep 
june 2016 by jm
Can the United Kingdom government legally disregard a vote for Brexit?
Oh thank god, there's a "get out of jail" card before they destroy the global economy to appease the eurosceptics.
On the day after a vote for Brexit, the UK will still be a member state of the EU. All the legislation which gives effect to EU law will still be in place. Nothing as a matter of law changes in any way just because of a vote to Leave. What will make all the legal difference is not a decision to leave by UK voters in a non-binding advisory vote, but the decision of the prime minister on how to react before making any Article 50 notification. And what the prime minister will do politically after a referendum vote for Brexit is, at the moment, as unknown as the result of the result of the referendum itself.
brexit  law  uk  government  referenda  eurosceptics  eu 
june 2016 by jm
UK at serious risk of over-blocking content online, human rights watchdog warns | Ars Technica UK
The IWF in the spotlight...
The blacklist operated by the IWF effectively amounts to censorship. Not only are the blacklist and notices sent to members of the IWF kept secret, but there is no requirement to notify website owners when their site has been added to the blacklist. Even where statutory rules do exist with respect to notice and take-down procedures (namely, the Terrorism Act 2006 and the Defamation (Operators of Websites) Regulations 2013), the provisions are not so concerned with safeguards for the protection of freedom of expression, as with offering an exemption from liability for ISPs.
iwf  censorship  uk  filtering  coe  eu  europe 
june 2016 by jm
German Privacy Regulators Fined Adobe, Others Over U.S. Data Transfers
Adobe was fined 8,000 euros, Punica 9,000 euros and Unilever 11,000 euros. The regulator said they had put in place alternative legal mechanisms for transferring data to the United States following the fine. “The fact that the companies have eventually implemented a legal basis for the transfer had to be taken into account in a favorable way for the calculation of the fines,” said Johannes Caspar, the Hamburg Commissioner for Data Protection. “For future infringements, stricter measures have to be applied.”
data-protection  eu  fines  us  privacy  safe-harbor 
june 2016 by jm
Ireland will need referendum to create EU court for patents
omg. Sean "Irish SOPA" Sherlock dealing with the important issues once again -- in this case the bloody "Unified Patent Court"
patents  eu  sean-sherlock  absurd  referenda  ireland  ip 
may 2016 by jm
Anti-innovation: EU excludes open source from new tech standards
EC up to its old anti-competitive tricks:
The European Commission is surprisingly coy about what exactly ['open'] means in this context. It is only on the penultimate page of the ICT Standardisation Priorities document that we finally read the following key piece of information: "ICT standardisation requires a balanced IPR [intellectual property rights] policy, based on FRAND licensing terms."

It's no surprise that the Commission was trying to keep that particular detail quiet, because FRAND licensing—the acronym stands for "fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory"—is incompatible with open source, which will therefore find itself excluded from much of the EU's grand new Digital Single Market strategy. That's hardly a "balanced IPR policy."
open-source  open  frand  eu  ec 
april 2016 by jm
ECHR: Websites not liable for readers' comments
'Lawyers for [a Hungarian news] site said the comments concerned had been taken down as soon as they were flagged. They said making their clients liable for everything readers posted "would have serious adverse repercussions for freedom of expression and democratic openness in the age of Internet". The ECHR agreed. "Although offensive and vulgar, the incriminated comments did not constitute clearly unlawful speech; and they certainly did not amount to hate speech or incitement to violence," the judges wrote.'
echr  law  eu  legal  comments  index-hu  hungary 
february 2016 by jm
Why is Safe Harbour II such a challenge? - EDRi
The only possible deal that is immediately available is where the European Commission agrees a politically expeditious but legally untenable deal, creating a time bomb rather than a durable deal, to the benefit of no one. In absence of reforms before an agreement, individuals’ fundamental rights would remain under threat.
edri  law  eu  ec  ecj  surveillance  snooping  us-politics  safe-harbor 
february 2016 by jm
ECB forcing Ireland to pay the bondholders was like a hostage situation | David McWilliams
At the time, many of us citizens thought the State was being craven in the face of the EU but it is now clear that Trichet’s ECB was prepared to let the Irish banks go to the wall, prompting a new bank run in 2010. This is like a hostage situation. The ECB was saying to the Irish government: you managed in September 2008 to prevent a bank run with the guarantee (which should always have been temporary and conditional) but now we are going to threaten you with another bank run – because we are still funding your banks and you must pay all the bondholders and add the cost to the national debt of the country. So the implicit threat was: “We will close the banks, cause a bank run and you will be left to pick up the pieces politically, socially and economically.”
banking  ireland  politics  ecb  eu  bondholders  jean-claude-trichet  economics 
january 2016 by jm
EU counter-terror bill is 'indiscriminate' data sweep
"To identify if someone is travelling outside the EU, we don't need an EU PNR. This data are already easily available in the airline reservation system,” [Giovanni Buttarelli, the European data protection supervisor] said. EU governments want more information in the belief it will help law enforcement in tracking down terrorists and are demanding access to information, such as travel dates, travel itinerary, ticket information, contact details, baggage information, and payment information of anyone flying in or out of the EU. ... EU PNR data would be retained for up to five years
pnr  eu  law  privacy  data-protection  europe  counter-terrorism  travel  air-travel 
december 2015 by jm
Senior Anglo bondholders revealed in department note
In case you were wondering who Ireland's economy was wiped out for:
Among the major holders were a Dutch pension fund, ABP; another Dutch fund, PGGM; LGPI in Finland, which manages local government pensions; and a Swiss public entities pension. A number of major asset managers were also named, including JP Morgan in London; DeKA and ADIG, two German investment managers; and Robeco from the Netherlands. Big insurance companies, including Munich Re, Llmarinen from Finland and German giant Axa were also named, along with big banks such as BNP, SocGen, ING and Deutsche.
bondholders  anglo  economy  ireland  politics  eu  senior-bondholders 
november 2015 by jm
Tesla Autopilot mode is learning
This is really impressive, but also a little scary. Drivers driving the Tesla Model S are "phoning home" training data as they drive:
A Model S owner by the username Khatsalano kept a count of how many times he had to “rescue” (meaning taking control after an alert) his Model S while using the Autopilot on his daily commute. He counted 6 “rescues” on his first day, by the fourth day of using the system on his 23.5 miles commute, he only had to take control over once. Musk said that Model S owners could add ~1 million miles of new data every day, which is helping the company create “high precision maps”.


Wonder if the data protection/privacy implications have been considered for EU use.
autopilot  tesla  maps  mapping  training  machine-learning  eu  privacy  data-protection 
november 2015 by jm
Net neutrality: EU votes in favour of Internet fast lanes and slow lanes | Ars Technica UK
:(
In the end, sheer political fatigue may have played a major part in undermining net neutrality in the EU. However, the battle is not quite over. As Anne Jellema, CEO of the Web Foundation, which was established by Berners-Lee in 2009, notes in her response to today's EU vote: "The European Parliament is essentially tossing a hot potato to the Body of European Regulators, national regulators and the courts, who will have to decide how these spectacularly unclear rules will be implemented. The onus is now on these groups to heed the call of hundreds of thousands of concerned citizens and prevent a two-speed Internet."
eu  net-neutrality  internet  europe  ep  politics 
october 2015 by jm
After Bara: All your (Data)base are belong to us
Sounds like the CJEU's Bara decision may cause problems for the Irish government's wilful data-sharing:
Articles 10, 11 and 13 of Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 1995, on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data, must be interpreted as precluding national measures, such as those at issue in the main proceedings, which allow a public administrative body of a Member State to transfer personal data to another public administrative body and their subsequent processing, without the data subjects having been informed of that transfer or processing.
data  databases  bara  cjeu  eu  law  privacy  data-protection 
october 2015 by jm
Tech companies like Facebook not above the law, says Max Schrems
“Big companies didn’t only rely on safe harbour: they also rely on binding corporate rules and standard contractual clauses. But it’s interesting that the court decided the case on fundamental rights grounds: so it doesn’t matter remotely what ground you transfer on, if that process is still illegal under 7 and 8 of charter, it can’t be done.”


Also:
“Ireland has no interest in doing its job, and will continue not to, forever. Clearly it’s an investment issue – but overall the policy is: we don’t regulate companies here. The cost of challenging any of this in the courts is prohibitive. And the people don’t seem to care.”


:(
ireland  guardian  max-schrems  privacy  surveillance  safe-harbor  eu  us  nsa  dpc  data-protection 
october 2015 by jm
net.wars: Unsafe harbor
Wendy Grossman on where the Safe Harbor decision is leading.
One clause would require European companies to tell their relevant data protection authorities if they are being compelled to turn over data - even if they have been forbidden to disclose this under US law. Sounds nice, but doesn't mobilize the rock or soften the hard place, since companies will still have to pick a law to violate. I imagine the internal discussions there revolving around two questions: which violation is less likely to land the CEO in jail and which set of fines can we afford?


(via Simon McGarr)
safe-harbor  privacy  law  us  eu  surveillance  wendy-grossman  via:tupp_ed 
october 2015 by jm
ECJ ruling on Irish privacy case has huge significance
The only current way to comply with EU law, the judgment indicates, is to keep EU data within the EU. Whether those data can be safely managed within facilities run by US companies will not be determined until the US rules on an ongoing Microsoft case.
Microsoft stands in contempt of court right now for refusing to hand over to US authorities, emails held in its Irish data centre. This case will surely go to the Supreme Court and will be an extremely important determination for the cloud business, and any company or individual using data centre storage. If Microsoft loses, US multinationals will be left scrambling to somehow, legally firewall off their EU-based data centres from US government reach.


(cough, Amazon)
aws  hosting  eu  privacy  surveillance  gchq  nsa  microsoft  ireland 
october 2015 by jm
5 takeaways from the death of safe harbor – POLITICO
Reacting to the ruling, the [EC] stressed that data transfers between the U.S. and Europe can continue on the basis of other legal mechanisms.

A lot rides on what steps the Commission and national data protection supervisors take in response. “It is crucial for legal certainty that the EC sends a clear signal,” said Nauwelaerts.

That could involve providing a timeline for concluding an agreement with U.S. authorities, together with a commitment from national data protection authorities not to block data transfers while negotiations are on-going, he explained.
safe-harbor  data  privacy  eu  ec  snowden  law  us 
october 2015 by jm
Daragh O'Brien on the CJEU judgement on Safe Harbor
Many organisations I've spoken to have had the cunning plan of adopting model contract clauses as their fall back position to replace their reliance on Safe Harbor. [....] The best that can be said for Model Clauses is that they haven't been struck down by the CJEU. Yet.
model-clauses  cjeu  eu  europe  safe-harbor  us  nsa  surveillance  privacy  law 
october 2015 by jm
How the banks ignored the lessons of the crash
First of all, banks could be chopped up into units that can safely go bust – meaning they could never blackmail us again. Banks should not have multiple activities going on under one roof with inherent conflicts of interest. Banks should not be allowed to build, sell or own overly complex financial products – clients should be able to comprehend what they buy and investors understand the balance sheet. Finally, the penalty should land on the same head as the bonus, meaning nobody should have more reason to lie awake at night worrying over the risks to the bank’s capital or reputation than the bankers themselves. You might expect all major political parties to have come out by now with their vision of a stable and productive financial sector. But this is not what has happened.
banks  banking  guardian  finance  europe  eu  crash  history 
september 2015 by jm
EU court adviser: data-share deal with U.S. is invalid | Reuters
The Safe Harbor agreement does not do enough to protect EU citizen's private information when it reached the United States, Yves Bot, Advocate General at the European Court of Justice (ECJ), said. While his opinions are not binding, they tend to be followed by the court's judges, who are currently considering a complaint about the system in the wake of revelations from ex-National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden of mass U.S. government surveillance.
safe-harbor  law  eu  ec  ecj  snowden  surveillance  privacy  us  data  max-schrems 
september 2015 by jm
Angela Merkel told a sobbing girl she couldn't save her from deportation. It was a lie. - Vox
Argentina has, as a matter of constitutional law, effectively open borders. There are no caps or quotas or lottery systems. You can move there legally if you have an employer or family member to sponsor you. That's all you need. If you don't have a sponsor, and make your way in illegally, you're recognized as an "irregular migrant." Discrimination against irregular migrants in health care or education is illegal, and deportation in noncriminal cases is exceptionally rare. Large-scale amnesties are the norm.

Obviously Argentina is not nearly as rich as Germany or the US or the UK. But it's considerably richer than three of its neighbors (Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil). And yet it doesn't try hard to keep their residents out. It welcomes them — as it should. "One could have expected catastrophe—an uncontrollable flow of poorer immigrants streaming into the country coupled with angry public backlash," Elizabeth Slater writes in the World Policy Journal. "That hasn't happened."

Angela Merkel clearly expects catastrophe if she lets people like this weeping young Palestinian girl stay in Germany. That catastrophe is simply a myth; it wouldn't happen. What would happen is that Germany's economy would grow, its culture would grow richer, and that girl and more like her could see their lives improve immeasurably.
argentina  immigration  angela-merkel  germany  eu  migrants  deportation  economics 
july 2015 by jm
Shock European court decision: Websites are liable for users’ comments | Ars Technica
In the wake of this judgment, the legal situation is complicated. In an e-mail to Ars, T J McIntyre, who is a lecturer in law and Chairman of Digital Rights Ireland, the lead organization that won an important victory against EU data retention in the Court of Justice of the European Union last year, explained where things now stand. "Today's decision doesn't have any direct legal effect. It simply finds that Estonia's laws on site liability aren't incompatible with the ECHR. It doesn't directly require any change in national or EU law. Indirectly, however, it may be influential in further development of the law in a way which undermines freedom of expression. As a decision of the Grand Chamber of the ECHR it will be given weight by other courts and by legislative bodies."
ars-technica  delfi  free-speech  eu  echr  tj-mcintyre  law  europe  estonia 
june 2015 by jm
Huge Loss For Free Speech In Europe: Human Rights Court Says Sites Liable For User Comments | Techdirt
The ruling is terrible through and through. First off, it insists that the comments on the news story were clearly "hate speech" and that, as such, "did not require any linguistic or legal analysis since the remarks were on their face manifestly unlawful." To the court, this means that it's obvious such comments should have been censored straight out. That's troubling for a whole host of reasons at the outset, and highlights the problematic views of expressive freedom in Europe. Even worse, however, the Court then notes that freedom of expression is "interfered with" by this ruling, but it doesn't seem to care -- saying that it is deemed "necessary in a democratic society."


This is going to have massive chilling effects. Terrible ruling from the ECHR.
echr  freedom  via:tjmcintyre  law  europe  eu  comments  free-speech  censorship  hate-speech 
june 2015 by jm
EU-US data pact skewered in court hearing
A lawyer for the European Commission told an EU judge on Tuesday (24 March) he should close his Facebook page if he wants to stop the US snooping on him, in what amounts to an admission that Safe Harbour, an EU-US data protection pact, doesn’t work.
safe-harbour  privacy  data-protection  ecj  eu  ec  surveillance  facebook  nsa  gchq 
march 2015 by jm
ECJ case debates EU citizens' right to privacy
The US wields secretive and indiscriminate powers to collect data, he said, and had never offered Brussels any commitments to guarantee EU privacy standards for its citizens’ data. On the contrary, said [Max Schrems' counsel] Mr Hoffmann, “Safe Harbour” provisions could be overruled by US domestic law at any time.
Thus he asked the court for a full judicial review of the “illegal” Safe Harbour principles which, he said, violated the essence of privacy and left EU citizens “effectively stripped of any protection”.
[Irish] DPC counsel Paul Anthony McDermott SC suggested that Mr Schrems had not been harmed in any way by the status quo. “This is not surprising, given that the NSA isn’t currently interested in the essays of law students in Austria,” he said.
Mr Travers for Mr Schrems disagreed, saying “the breach of the right to privacy is itself the harm”.
ireland  dpc  data-protection  privacy  eu  ec  ecj  law  rights  safe-harbour 
march 2015 by jm
Ireland accused of weakening data rules
Privacy campaign group Lobbyplag puts Ireland one of top three offenders in pushing for changes to EU privacy law
privacy  data-protection  lobbyplag  ireland  eu  germany  lobbying 
march 2015 by jm
Digital Rights Ireland announces its first conference!
Digital Rights Europe, Wednesday, April 15th in Dublin. deadly!
digital-rights  ireland  dri  privacy  data-protection  europe  eu 
february 2015 by jm
Surveillance of social media not way to fight terrorism – Minister
Blanket surveillance of social media is not the solution to combating terrorism and the rights of the individual to privacy must be protected, Data Protection Minister Dara Murphy said on Monday. [He] said Ireland and the European Union must protect the privacy rights of individuals on social media. “Freedom of expression, freedom of movement, and the protection of privacy are core tenets of the European Union, which must be upheld.”
dara-murphy  data-protection  privacy  surveillance  europe  eu  ireland  social-media 
january 2015 by jm
More on the VATMOSS debacle
This is a really good page summarizing where UK-based small digital-media-vending businesses stand
smes  uk  vat  vatmoss  tax  fail  eu 
december 2014 by jm
The VATMOSS debacle: does the "manual email" loophole work?
As the 1 January deadline gallops towards the EU, microbusinesses desperate to stay open without breaking the law try to find out, "Can I email stuff out instead?" Well... Yes. - No - It depends - and simultaneously yes AND no, according to Schrödinger’s VAT. So that's clear, then.
vat  vatmoss  eu  tax  fiasco  email  microbusiness  sme 
december 2014 by jm
Digital Rights Ireland files Amicus Brief in Microsoft v USA with Liberty and ORG
Microsoft -v- USA is an important ongoing case, currently listed for hearing in 2015 before the US Federal Court of Appeal of the 2nd Circuit.

However, as the case centres around the means by which NY law enforcement are seeking to access data of an email account which resides in Dublin, it is also crucially significant to Ireland and the rest of the EU. For that reason, Digital Rights Ireland instructed us to file an Amicus Brief in the US case, in conjunction with the global law firm of White & Case, who have acted pro bono in their representation.

Given the significance of the case for the wider EU, both Liberty and the Open Rights Group in the UK have joined Digital Rights Ireland as amici on this brief. We hope it will be of aid to the US court in assessing the significance of the order being appealed by Microsoft for EU citizens and European states, in the light of the existing US and EU Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty.
amicus-briefs  law  us  dri  microsoft  mlats  org  liberty  eu  privacy 
december 2014 by jm
Irish government in favour of ISDS court-evasion for multinationals
This has _already_ been used to trump national law. As Simon McGarr noted at https://twitter.com/Tupp_Ed/statuses/526103760041680898 :

'Philip Morris initiated a dispute under the Australia-Hong Kong Bilateral Investment Treaty to force #plainpacks repeal and compensation'.

"Plain packs" anti-smoking is being bitterly fought at the moment here in Ireland.

More from the US point of view: http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/harold-meyerson-allowing-foreign-firms-to-sue-nations-hurts-trade-deals/2014/10/01/4b3725b0-4964-11e4-891d-713f052086a0_story.html :

'The Obama administration’s insistence on ISDS may please Wall Street, but it threatens to undermine some of the president’s landmark achievements in curbing pollution and fighting global warming, not to mention his commitment to a single standard of justice. It’s not worthy of the president, and he should join Europe in scrapping it.'
isds  national-law  law  ireland  sovereignty  multinationals  philip-morris  us-politics  eu  free-trade 
october 2014 by jm
SI336 - current Irish anti-spam law
"European Communities (Electronic Communications Networks and Services) (Privacy and Electronic Communications) Regulations 2011". Spam is covered under 13.1, "Unsolicited communications", on page 16 of this PDF
spam  anti-spam  law  ireland  eu  ec  sms  email  si336  privacy  regulation 
september 2014 by jm
European Commission Consultation On Copyright Reveals Chasm Between Views Of Public And Publishers | Techdirt
The two charts indicate that current EU copyright is very unbalanced. When one side is completely satisfied with the status quo and the other is very unhappy then this is not a balanced situation. Given that a good compromise should leave everybody equally unhappy, the results of the consultation also show the direction for copyright reform efforts of the new EU Commission: re-balancing copyright requires at least some reform as demanded by end users and institutional users, most importantly a more harmonized and flexible system of exceptions and limitations.
copyright  views  publishers  eu  ec  europe  reform  law 
august 2014 by jm
Obama administration says the world’s servers are ours | Ars Technica
In its briefs filed last week, the US government said that content stored online doesn't enjoy the same type of Fourth Amendment protections as data stored in the physical world. The government cited (PDF) the Stored Communications Act (SCA), a President Ronald Reagan-era regulation.


Michael McDowell has filed a declaration in support of MS' position (attached to that article a couple of paras down) suggesting that the MLAT between the US and Ireland is the correct avenue.
privacy  eu  us-politics  microsoft  michael-mcdowell  law  surveillance  servers  sca  internet 
july 2014 by jm
Tor exit node operator prosecuted in Austria
'The operator of an exit node is guilty of complicity, because he enabled others to transmit content of an illegal nature through the service.'

Via Tony Finch.
austria  tor  security  law  liability  internet  tunnelling  eu  via:fanf 
july 2014 by jm
Data sharing deal with U.S. referred to EU's top court | Reuters
High Court Justice Gerard Hogan said that given the Safe Harbour agreement, which says that U.S. has sufficient data safeguards in place, the Irish regulator did not have the authority to investigate. If Safe Harbour stands, the student group's application must fail, he said. "The critical issue which arises is whether the proper interpretation of the 1995 [EU data protection] directive and the 2000 Commission decision [on the Safe Harbour principles] should be re-evaluated in the light of the subsequent entry into force of article 8 of the EU charter," on the right to the protection of personal data, Hogan said.
eu  safe-harbor  privacy  high-court  ireland  law  data-protection 
june 2014 by jm
DRI wins their case at the ECJ!
Great stuff!
The Court has found that data retention “entails a wide-ranging and particularly serious interference with the fundamental rights to respect for private life and to the protection of personal data” and that it “entails an interference with the fundamental rights of practically the entire European population”. TJ McIntyre, Chairman of Digital Rights Ireland, said that “This is the first assessment of mass surveillance by a supreme court since the Snowden revelations. The ECJ’s judgement finds that untargeted monitoring of the entire population is unacceptable in a democratic society.”

[...] Though the Directive has now been struck down, the issue will remain live in all the countries who have passed domestic law to implement the data retention mass surveillance regime. Digital Rights Ireland’s challenge to the Irish data retention system will return to the High Court in Dublin for the next phase of litigation.
dri  digital-rights  ireland  eu  ecj  surveillance  snooping  law  data-retention 
april 2014 by jm
European Parliament passes strong net neutrality law, along with major roaming reforms
European fans of the open internet can breathe a sigh of relief: the European parliament has passed a major package of telecoms law reform, complete with amendments that properly define and protect net neutrality. The amendments were introduced by the Socialist, Liberal, Green and Left blocs in the European Parliament after the final committee to tweak the package – the industry committee – left in a bunch of loopholes that would have allowed telcos to start classifying web services of their choice as “specialized services” that they can treat differently. [...] Now the whole package gets passed through to the next Parliament (elections are coming up in May), then the representatives of European countries for final approval.
netneutrality  eu  ep  europe  neelie-kroes  freedom  isps  telecom 
april 2014 by jm
WePromise.EU
'The European election will take place between 22 and 25 May 2014. Citizens, promise to vote for candidates that have signed a 10-point charter of digital rights! Show candidates that they need to earn your vote by signing our charter!'
europarl  ep  digital-rights  rights  ireland  eu  data-privacy  data-protection  privacy 
march 2014 by jm
James Casey writes about working at CERN
I am very heartened by Minister of State for Research and Innovation Sean Sherlock’s recent announcement of a review of the costs and benefits of Ireland’s membership of international research organisations including CERN. I disagreed with the conclusion of the last review which suggested that costs outweighed the benefits to Ireland. I think it was an extreme oversight not to be a part of the engineering phase of the Collider during the period 1998-2008 – but it’s not too late.
CERN will celebrate its 60th anniversary in 2014. There is no public scientific institution its equal in terms of the scale and complexity of problems being analysed and solved. No longer excluding young Irish people from being a part of this, from learning and growing from it, can only help Ireland.


Also, spot my name in lights ;)
ireland  cern  science  europe  eu  sean-sherlock  james-casey  www  web  history 
march 2014 by jm
CJEU in #Svensson says that in general it is OK to hyperlink to protected works without permission
IPKat says 'this morning the Court of Justice of the European Union issued its keenly awaited decision in Case C-466/12 Svensson [...]: The owner of a website may, without the authorisation of the copyright holders, redirect internet users, via hyperlinks, to protected works available on a freely accessible basis on another site. This is so even if the internet users who click on the link have the impression that the work is appearing on the site that contains the link.'

This is potentially big news. Not so much for the torrent-site scenario, but for the NNI/NLI linking-to-newspaper-stories scenario.
ip  svensson  cjeu  eu  law  linking  hyperlinks  pirate-bay  internet  web  links  http  copyright 
february 2014 by jm
Survey results of EU teens using the internet
A lot of unsupervised use:
Just under half of children said they access the internet from their own bedroom on a daily basis with 22pc saying they do so several times a day.
surveys  eu  ireland  politics  filtering  internet  social-media  facebook  children  teens  cyber-bullying 
february 2014 by jm
German IT Industry Looks for Boom from Snowden Revelations - SPIEGEL ONLINE
This is a great idea -- Neelie Kroes suggesting that there be a certification mark for EU companies who have top-of-the-line data protection practices.
data-protection  privacy  certification  marks  eu  neelie-kroes 
february 2014 by jm
URGENT: Input needed on EU copyright consultation - Boing Boing
The EC is looking for feedback -- but not much, and pretty sharpish.
Go to www.copywrongs.eu and answer the questions which are important to you. You do not have to answer all the questions, only the ones that matter to you. [...] The deadline is 5 February 2014. Until then, we should provide the European Commission with as many responses as possible!
ec  eu  copyright  law  europe  boing-boing  reform 
january 2014 by jm
Karlin Lillington on DRI's looming victory in the European Court of Justice
If the full European Court of Justice (ECJ) accepts the opinion of its advocate general in a final ruling due early next year – and it almost always does – it will prove a huge vindication of Ireland’s small privacy advocacy group, Digital Rights Ireland (DRI).
Its case against Irish retention laws, which began in 2006, forms the basis of this broader David v Goliath challenge and initial opinion.
The advocate general’s advice largely upholds the key concerns put forward by DRI against Ireland’s laws. Withholding so much data about every citizen, including children, in case someone commits a future crime, is too intrusive into private life, and could allow authorities to create a “faithful and exhaustive map of a large portion of a person’s [private] conduct”.
Retained data is so comprehensive that they could easily reveal private identities, which are supposed to remain anonymous. And the data, entrusted to third parties, is at too much risk of fraudulent or malicious use.
Cruz Villalón argues that there must be far greater oversight to the retention process, and controls on access to data, and that citizens should have the right to be notified after the fact if their data has been scrutinised. The Irish Government had repeatedly waved off such concerns from Digital Rights Ireland in the past.
dri  rights  ireland  internet  surveillance  data-retention  privacy  eu  ecj  law 
december 2013 by jm
Where your "full Irish" really comes from
This is really disappointing; many meats labelled as "Irish" are anything but. The only trustworthy mark is the Bord Bia "Origin Ireland" stamp -- I'll be avoiding any products without this in future.
Under European labelling law, country of origin is mandatory for beef, fish, olive oil, honey and fresh fruit and vegetables. Next month the EU will make it law to specify country of origin for the meat of pigs, chicken, sheep and goats, with a lead-in time of anywhere up to three years for food companies to comply.
The pork rule, however, will only apply to fresh pork and not to processed meat, so consumers still won’t get a country-of-origin label on rashers, sausages or ham. In the meantime, the Bord Bia Origin-Ireland stamp is a guarantee that your Irish breakfast ingredients are indeed Irish.
bord-bia  labelling  eu  country-of-origin  meat  pork  food  quality 
november 2013 by jm
European Parliament passes a vote calling for the EU/US SWIFT agreement to be suspended
"the European Parliament has today sent a clear message that enough is enough. The revelations about NSA interception of SWIFT data make a mockery of the EU's agreement with the US, through which the bank data of European citizens is delivered to the US anti-terror system (TFTP). What is the purpose of an agreement like this, which was concluded in good faith, if the US authorities are going to circumvent its provisions?

"The EU cannot continue to remain silent in the face of these ongoing revelations: it gives the impression we are little more than a lap dog of the US. If we are to have a healthy relationship with the US, based on mutual respect and benefit, EU governments must not be afraid of defending core EU values when they are infringed. EU leaders must finally take a clear and unambiguous stance on the NSA violations at this week's summit."
swift  banking  data  eu  us  nsa  interception  surveillance  snooping  diplomacy 
october 2013 by jm
Sorry, lobbyists! Europe’s post-Snowden privacy reform gets a major boost
Following months of revelations, and on the same day that France heard its citizens’ phone calls were being reportedly recorded en masse by the Americans, the Parliament’s committee gave a resounding thumbs-up to every single amendment proposed by industrious German Green MEP Jan Phillip Albrecht (pictured above).


lolz.
lobbying  tech  surveillance  privacy  eu  jan-phillip-albrecht  ep  spying 
october 2013 by jm
GCHQ tapping at least 14 EU fiber-optic cables
Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ) had already revealed in late June that the British had access to the cable TAT-14, which connects Germany with the USA, UK, Denmark, France and the Netherlands. In addition to TAT-14, the other cables that GCHQ has access to include Atlantic Crossing 1, Circe North, Circe South, Flag Atlantic-1, Flag Europa-Asia, SeaMeWe-3 and SeaMeWe-4, Solas, UK France 3, UK Netherlands-14, Ulysses, Yellow and the Pan European Crossing.
sz  germany  cables  fiber-optic  tapping  snooping  tat-14  eu  politics  gchq 
august 2013 by jm
Merkel call for data protection rules puts Ireland in spotlight - Technology News
Irish Times on EU unhappiness with Ireland's "light touch" data protection regime:
Hawkes’s appearance last month on RTÉ’s Morning Ireland regarding the US Prism surveillance programme, since posted to YouTube, reheated lingering resentment among many European data authorities. His admission that he “knew in a general way” about such programmes and didn’t “regard this particular revelation as particularly new” was a red rag to his European colleagues who fear Ireland is the transmission point of wholesale EU data to the US.
eu  ireland  data-protection  privacy  billy-hawkes  regulation  dpc 
july 2013 by jm
Latest leak of EU Data Protection Regulation makes fines impossible
Well, isn't this convenient. The leaked proposed regulation document from the Irish EU presidency contains the following changes from current law:
what is new is a set of prescriptive conditions which, if adopted, appears to make a Monetary Penalty Notice (MPN) almost impracticable to serve. This is because the [Data Protection] Commissioner would have consider a dozen factors (many of which will give no doubt rise to appeal). [...]

In addition, the fines in the Regulation require consideration of the actual damage caused; this compares unfavourably with the current MPN where large fines have been contingent on grave security errors on the part of the data controller (i.e. the MPN of the UK DPA does not need damage to data subjects – only the likelihood of substantial distress or damage which should have been preventable/foreseeable).
data-protection  law  eu  ec  ireland  privacy  fines  regulation  mpn 
june 2013 by jm
Open Rights Group - EU Commission caved to US demands to drop anti-PRISM privacy clause
Reports this week revealed that the US successfully pressed the European Commission to drop sections of the Data Protection Regulation that would, as the Financial Times explains, “have nullified any US request for technology and telecoms companies to hand over data on EU citizens.

The article [...] would have prohibited transfers of personal information to a third country under a legal request, for example the one used by the NSA for their PRISM programme, unless “expressly authorized by an international agreement or provided for by mutual legal assistance treaties or approved by a supervisory authority.”

The Article was deleted from the draft Regulation proper, which was published shortly afterwards in January 2012. The reports suggest this was due to intense pressure from the US. Commission Vice-President Viviane Reding favoured keeping the the clause, but other Commissioners seemingly did not grasp the significance of the article.
org  privacy  us  surveillance  fisaaa  viviane-reding  prism  nsa  ec  eu  data-protection 
june 2013 by jm
Why I won’t give the European Parliament the data protection analysis it wanted
Holy crap. Simon Davies rips into the EU data-protection reform disaster with gusto:
The situation was an utter disgrace. The advertising industry even gave an award to an Irish Minister for destroying some of the rights in the regulation while the UK managed to force a provision that would make the direct marketing industry a “legitimate” processing operation in its own right, putting it on the same level of lawful processing as fraud prevention. Things got to the point where even the most senior data protection officials in Europe stopped trying to influence events and had told me “let the chips fall as they may”.
[...]

But let’s take a step back for a moment from this travesty. Out on the streets – while most may not know what data protection is – people certainly know what it is supposed to protect. People value their privacy and they will be vocal about attempts to destroy it.
I had said as much to the joint parliamentary meeting, observing “the one element that has been left out of all these efforts is the public”. However, as the months rolled on, the only message being sent to the public was that data protection is an anachronism stitched together with self interest and impracticality.
[...]

I wasn’t aware at the time that there was a vast stitch-up to kill the reforms. I cannot bring myself to present a temperate report with measured wording that pretends this is all just normal business. It isn’t normal business, and it should never be normal business in any civilized society. How does one talk in measured tones about such endemic hypocrisy and deception? If you want to know who the real enemy of privacy is, don’t just look to the American agencies. The real enemy is right here in the European Parliament in the guise of MEPs who have knowingly sold our rights away to maintain powerful relationships. I’d like to say they were merely hoodwinked into supporting the vandalism, but many are smart people who knew exactly what they were doing.


Nice work, Irish presidency! His bottom line:
Is there a way forward? I believe so. First, governments should yield to common decency and scrap the illegitimate and poisoned Irish Council draft and hand the task to the Lithuanian Presidency that commences next month. Second, the Irish and British governments should be infinitely more transparent about their cooperation with intrusive interests that fuelled the deception.
ireland  eu  europe  reform  law  data-protection  privacy  simon-davies  meps  iab 
june 2013 by jm
EU unlocks a great new source of online innovation
Today the European Parliament voted to formally agree new rules on open data – effectively making a reality of the proposal which I first put forward just over 18 months ago, and making it easier to open up huge amounts of public sector data.


Great news -- wonder how it'll affect the Ordnance Survey of Ireland?
osi  mapping  open-data  open  data  europe  eu  neelie-kroes 
june 2013 by jm
Spamalot reigns: the spoils of Ireland’s EU kingship | The Irish Times - Thu, Jun 13, 2013
The spam presidency. As European citizens are made the miserable targets of unimpeded “direct marketing”, that may be how Ireland’s stint in the EU presidency seat is recalled for years to come.
Under the guiding hand of Minister for Justice Alan Shatter, the Council of the European Union has submitted proposals for amendments to a proposed new data protection regulation, all of which overwhelmingly favour business and big organisations, not citizens.
The most obviously repugnant and surprising element in the amendments is a watering down of existing protections for EU citizens against the willy-nilly marketing Americans are forced to endure. In the US there are few meaningful restrictions on what businesses can do with people’s personal information when pitching products and services at them.
In the EU, this has always been strictly controlled; information gathered for one purpose cannot be used by a business to sell whatever it wants – unless you have opted in to receive such solicitations. This means you are not constantly bombarded by emails and junk mail, nor do you get non-stop phone calls from telemarketers.
Under the proposed amendments to the draft data protection regulation, direct marketing would become a legal form of data processing. In effect, this would legitimise spam email, junk print mail and marketing calls. This unexpected provision signals just how successful powerful corporate lobbyists have been in convincing ministers that business matters more than privacy or giving citizens reasonable control over their personal information.
Far worse is contained in other amendments, which in effect turn the original draft of the regulation upside down.


Fantastic article from Karlin Lillington in today's Times on the terrible amendments proposed for the EU's data protection law.
eu  law  prism  data-protection  privacy  ireland  ec  marketing  spam  anti-spam  email 
june 2013 by jm
PRISM explains the wider lobbying issues surrounding EU data protection reform | EDRI
The US has very successfully and expertly lobbied against the [EU] data protection package directly, it has mobilised and supported US industry lobbying. US industry has lobbied in its own name and mobilised malleable European trade associations to lobby on their behalf to amplify their message, “independent” “think tanks” have been created to amplify their message again. The result is not just the biggest lobbying effort that Brussels has ever seen, but also the broadest.

Compliant Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) and EU Member States [...] have been imposing a “death by a thousand cuts” on the Regulation. Where previously there was a clear obligation to collect the “minimum necessary” data for any given service, the vague requirement to retain “not excessive” data is now preferred. Where previously companies could only use data for purposes that were “compatible” with the original reason for collecting the data, the Irish EU Presidency (pdf) has proposed a comical definition of “compatible” based on five elements, only one of which is related to the dictionary definition of the word.

Members of the European Parliament and EU Member States are falling over themselves to ensure that the EU does not maintain its strategic advantage over the US. In addition to dismantling the proposed Regulation, countries like the UK desperately seek to delay the whole process and subsume it into the EU-US free trade agreement (the so-called “investment partnership” TTIP/TAFTA), which would subordinate a fundamental rights discussion in a trade negotiation. The UK government is even prepared to humiliate itself by arguing in favour of the US position on the basis that two and a half years (see Communication from 2010, pdf) of discussion is too fast!
edri  data-protection  eu  ec  ireland  politics  usa  meps  privacy  uk  free-trade 
june 2013 by jm
Microsoft admits US government can access EU-based cloud data
interesting point from an MS Q&A back in 2011, quite relevant nowadays:
Q: Can Microsoft guarantee that EU-stored data, held in EU based datacenters, will not leave the European Economic Area under any circumstances — even under a request by the Patriot Act?

A: Frazer explained that, as Microsoft is a U.S.-headquartered company, it has to comply with local laws (the United States, as well as any other location where one of its subsidiary companies is based). Though he said that "customers would be informed wherever possible," he could not provide a guarantee that they would be informed — if a gagging order, injunction or U.S. National Security Letter permits it. He said: "Microsoft cannot provide those guarantees. Neither can any other company." While it has been suspected for some time, this is the first time Microsoft, or any other company, has given this answer. Any data which is housed, stored or processed by a company, which is a U.S. based company or is wholly owned by a U.S. parent company, is vulnerable to interception and inspection by U.S. authorities. 
microsoft  privacy  cloud-computing  eu  data-centers  data-protection  nsa  fisa  usa 
june 2013 by jm
LobbyPlag
wow, great view of which MEPs are eviscerating the EU's data protection regime:
Currently the EU is negotiating about new data privacy laws. This new EU Regulation will replace all existing national laws on data privacy. Here you can see a general overview which Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are pushing for more or less data privacy. Choose a country, a political group or a MEP from the “Top 10” list to find out more.
europe  eu  privacy  data-protection  datap  ec  regulation  meps 
june 2013 by jm
Council of the European Union Releases Draft Compromise Text on the Proposed EU Data Protection Regulation
Oh god. this sounds like an impending privacy and anti-spam disaster. "business-focussed":
Overall, the [Irish EC Presidency’s] draft compromise text can be seen as a more business-focused, pragmatic approach. For example, the Presidency has drafted an additional recital (Recital 3a), clarifying the right to data protection as a qualified right, highlighting the principle of proportionality and importance of other competing fundamental rights, including the freedom to conduct a business.


and some pretty serious relaxation of how consent for use of personal data is measured:

The criterion for valid consent is amended from “explicit” to “unambiguous,” except in the case of processing special categories of data (i.e., sensitive personal data) (Recital 25 and Article 9(2)). This reverts to the current position under the Data Protection Directive and is a concession to the practical difficulty of obtaining explicit consent in all cases.

The criteria for valid consent are further relaxed by the ability to obtain consent in writing, orally or in an electronic manner, and where technically feasible and effective, valid consent can be given using browser settings and other technical solutions. Further, the requirement that the controller bear the burden of proof that valid consent was obtained is limited to a requirement that the controller be able to “demonstrate” that consent was obtained (Recital 32 and Article 7(1)). The need for “informed” consent is also relaxed from the requirement to provide the full information requirements laid out in Article 14 to the minimal requirements that the data subject “at least” be made aware of: (1) the identity of the data controller, and (2) the purpose(s) of the processing of their personal data (Recitals 33 and 48).
anti-spam  privacy  data-protection  spam  ireland  eu  ec  regulation 
june 2013 by jm
IAB Europe awards MEP Sean Kelly for standing up for data privacy rights (video) - Ireland’s CIO and strategy news and reports service – Siliconrepublic.com
Irish MEP serving as a rapporteur on reform of the EU data protection regime, was given an award by an advertising trade group last month:
Sean Kelly, Fine Gael MEP for Ireland South [who serves as the EU’s Industry Committee Rapporteur for the General Data Protection Regulation], has been selected to receive the prestigious IAB Europe Award for Leadership and Excellence for his approach to dealing with privacy concerns over shortcomings in the European Commission’s data protection proposal.
IAB Europe represents more than 5,500 online advertising media, research and analytics organisations.
iab-europe  awards  spam  sean-kelly  ireland  meps  politics  eu  data-protection  privacy  ec 
june 2013 by jm
EDRI's comments on EU proposals to reform privacy law
Amendments 762, 764 and 765 in particular seem to move portions of the law from "confirmed opt-in required" to "opt-out is ok" -- which sounds like a risk where spam and unsolicited actions on a person's data are concerned
law  privacy  anti-spam  eu  spam  edri 
june 2013 by jm
EU Council deals killer blow to privacy reforms
'In an extraordinary result for corporate lobbying, direct marketing would by default be considered a legitimate data process and would therefore – by default – be lawful.'
eu  politics  data-protection  privacy  anti-spam  spam  eu-council  direct-marketing 
june 2013 by jm
Minister Rabbitte welcomes EU agreement on re-use of Public Sector Information
Lots of talk about "charging regimes", "income-generating public sector bodies" etc., but not a single mention of open data or free access. Terrible stuff. :( (via conoro)
via:conoro  open-access  government  public-sector  ireland  eu  open-data  public  free 
april 2013 by jm
What would you do: Part 2, the Island of Surpyc
Amazing. 'Cyprus Bailout Choose Your Own Adventure', basically
cyoa  adventure  dice  games  cyprus  politics  eu  bailouts  ecb  banking  troika 
march 2013 by jm
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