jm + equations   2

‘A Swiss cheese-like material’ that can solve equations | Penn Today
This is incredibly cool.
“For example," Engheta says, "if you were trying to plan the acoustics of a concert hall, you could write an integral equation where the inputs represent the sources of the sound, such as the position of speakers or instruments, as well as how loudly they play. Other parts of the equation would represent the geometry of the room and the material its walls are made of. Solving that equation would give you the volume at different points in the concert hall.” 

In the integral equation that describes the relationship between sound sources, room shape and the volume at specific locations, the features of the room — the shape and material properties of its walls — can be represented by the equation’s kernel. This is the part the Penn Engineering researchers are able to represent in a physical way, through the precise arrangement of air holes in their metamaterial Swiss cheese. 

“Our system allows you to change the inputs that represent the locations of the sound sources by changing the properties of the wave you send into the system,” Engheta says, “but if you want to change the shape of the room, for example, you will have to make a new kernel.” 
computing  analog  computers  hardware  papers  swiss-cheese  equations 
28 days ago by jm
How to Quantify Scalability
good page on the Universal Scalability Law and how to apply it
usl  performance  scalability  concurrency  capacity  measurement  excel  equations  metrics 
september 2016 by jm

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