jm + environment   8

‘Nothing to worry about. The water is fine’: how Flint poisoned its people | News | The Guardian
The anxiety reverberated all the way to the state capital, Lansing, where Governor Rick Snyder was weeks away from winning reelection. His chief legal counsel, Michael Gadola, wrote in an email: “To anyone who grew up in Flint as I did, the notion that I would be getting my drinking water from the Flint River is downright scary. Too bad the [emergency manager] didn’t ask me what I thought, though I’m sure he heard it from plenty of others. My mom is a city resident. Nice to know she’s drinking water with elevated chlorine levels and fecal coliform … They should try to get back on the Detroit system as a stopgap ASAP before this thing gets too far out of control.”
flint  michigan  bureaucracy  water  poisoning  corrosion  poison  us-politics  environment  taxes 
11 weeks ago by jm
Crazy maths makes nonsense of Irish climate change policy
'John FitzGerald on madness of Ireland burning peat for electricity:

'the current subsidy per job involved is at least €100,000 a year. The Bord na Móna annual report indicates that, in the year 2016/2017, its workers’ average pay was €50,000. In other words, the subsidy per job is around twice what the workers involved actually earn.

If the peat-fired power stations were closed tomorrow, and the workers involved continued to be employed on their current wages, subsidising these jobs would only cost €50 million, not €100 million. Electricity consumers would pay less to subsidise these jobs, and Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions would fall substantially as a result of discontinuing this polluting fuel use.'

We should plan for closure by 2020 of peat-fired electricity generation:

–greatly benefit environment;
–save electricity consumers money;
–protect livelihoods.
environment  peat  ireland  electricity  fossil-fuels  policy  climate-change 
june 2018 by jm
How to change Gradle cache location
$GRADLE_USER_HOME, basically -- it may also be possible to set from the Gradle script itself too
gradle  build  caching  environment  unix  cache 
may 2015 by jm
Photographs of Sellafield nuclear plant prompt fears over radioactive risk
"Slow-motion Chernobyl", as Greenpeace are calling it. You thought legacy code was a problem? try legacy Magnox fuel rods.
Previously unseen pictures of two storage ponds containing hundreds of highly radioactive fuel rods at the Sellafield nuclear plant show cracked concrete, seagulls bathing in the water and weeds growing around derelict machinery. But a spokesman for owners Sellafield Ltd said the 60-year-old ponds will not be cleaned up for decades, despite concern that they are in a dangerous state and could cause a large release of radioactive material if they are allowed to deteriorate further.

“The concrete is in dreadful condition, degraded and fractured, and if the ponds drain, the Magnox fuel will ignite and that would lead to a massive release of radioactive material,” nuclear safety expert John Large told the Ecologist magazine. “I am very disturbed at the run-down condition of the structures and support services. In my opinion there is a significant risk that the system could fail.
energy  environment  nuclear  uk  sellafield  magnox  seagulls  time  long-now 
october 2014 by jm
Inside a Chinese Bitcoin Mine
The mining operation resides on an old, repurposed factory floor, and contains 2500 machines hashing away at 230 Gh/s, each. (That’s 230 billion calculations per second, per unit). [...] The operators told me that the power bill of this specific operation is in excess of ¥400,000 per month [..] about $60,000 USD.
currency  china  economics  bitcoin  power  environment  green  mining  datacenters 
august 2014 by jm
An Taisce Fundamentally Opposes New Dublin City Council's Bizarre Plan To End Street Cleaning Services
No holds barred:
Speaking today, spokesman Charles Stanley-Smith said; "This idea is insane. This area has suffered from dumping due to a lack of enforcement - yet the council now propose to effectively withdraw services altogether.  As numerous studies such as 'the broken window hypothesis' indicate, where a small problem is left un-tackled it is likely to become far worse rather than better. In other words, rather than increase enforcement to solve the problem, Dublin City Council is going to remove enforcement.  How will this deal with the problem?  Imagine if that logic were applied to crime; would the removal of police services in an area help resolve criminal behaviour - or increase it? The answer is obvious."
an-taisce  environment  cleaning  dublin  ireland  dcc  rubbish  trash  society  d1 
april 2013 by jm

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